Date
• Sunday, October 24, 2010
• Gottlieb & Karoline Truher immigrants arrive in New York, July 8, 1870
• 2-Gottlieb & Karoline Truher immigrants arrive in New York, July 8, 1870 - printing the links and text this time.
Here is the composition of a collection of Gottlieb's Truher's life, in some part, though, more is known.

http://gene.truher.net/truher/WesternMetropolis-JBT/

is a web page which has pictures, most collected as follows:

http://gene.truher.net/truher/WesternMetropolis-JBT/WesternMetropolisSail-Steam.jpg

http://gene.truher.net/truher/WesternMetropolis-JBT/WesternMetropolis%20Sail-Steam2.jpg

http://gene.truher.net/truher/WesternMetropolis-JBT/San%20Salvador-WesternMetropolis-PA0693.jpg

http://gene.truher.net/truher/WesternMetropolis-JBT/San%20Salvador-WesternMetropolis-PA0693a.jpg

http://images.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/811/data?n=22

http://gene.truher.net/truher/WesternMetropolis-JBT/Western%20Metropolis-EXT00419.jpg

http://gene.truher.net/truher/WesternMetropolis-JBT/Western%20Metropolis-EXT00419f-w800.jpg

http://gene.truher.net/truher/WesternMetropolis-JBT/Havre-Bremen-Copenhagen-Swinemunde-Kiel-Christiansand-c.jpg

Record by Ron Haack w consult Jack, dated Feb 2001:
The early records of St. Lucas Lutheran Church in Bay View, Wisconsin (era about 1875) show Gottlieb Truher's last name spelled "Truhr, no "e"". Caroline Truher's maiden name is spelled "Pein', several places.
Time line For Gottlieb & Caroline Truher:
November 21, 1832: Born, Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland.
1859: Married, Danzig, Prussia.
July 08, 1870: Immigrated to USA via NYC, with August as infant (? - actually born in 1866 in Prussia). Caroline was pregnant with Charles Edward.
(From Filbey's "Germans to America", Volume 224, 1870:
From Germany to USA, Gottlieb Trur, age 38, Male, Farmer, Caroline Trur, age 32, Female, August Trur, age .11(eleven months, actually born in Prussia in 1866). Ship: Western Metropolis, from Swinemunde, Kiel and Christiansand to New York, arrived 08 July, 1870
From Jack Truher, Feb, 2000: "Now this begins to make sense. Of the three cities you list, two have somewhat different name adaptations. But this definitely begins to support the greater Berlin residency of the Trur family.
We can assume that the Filbey's entry probably means that the ship, Western Metropolis, began it's Western trip from Danzig. But it picked up the Trur family in Swineoujcscie (current Polish name for Swinemunde). Swineoujcscie is a shipping port, on the Baltic coast just at the border between Germany and modern Poland, about 50 miles north of Berlin. Then the ship traveled West to pick up additional passengers at Kiel, a major German port city on the Kiel Bay. In order to get out the Baltic Sea into the Atlantic, the ship must then travel North and then West. On the Southeast coast of Norway, the ship would have conveniently passed Kristiansand, another port where passengers boarded. Then on to New York.
The Danzig connection is: the ship's log would show that its journey began there. That association could be preserved in association with all passengers of that ship. I forget now how many sources have told us that Danzig was the Truher emigration point. I think there were other independent references of Danzig, but I can't name any of them, except the report I got from a German.")
August 11, 1870: Charles Edward was born in Wisconsin, probably Bay View. No Baptism record available as of 1999. Date verified per Confirmation Record at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.
August 1872: Brother Jakob emigrates from Danzig, Prussia via Baltimore,Maryland and arrives in Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin sometime later to join Gottlieb.
Note: A picture was discovered in January of 2001 of the brothers Jakob and Gottlieb. The date is unknown, and could have been in the early 1870's in America, or in Germany before they emigrated.
January 22, 1873: Matheldie Helene (Aunt Till) born, Bay View, Wisconsin.
July 7, 1874: Herman Adolph and Julius Albert born, Bay View, Wisconsin.
July 21, 1874: Herman Adolph and Julius Albert die, Bay View, Wisconsin.
November 29, 1875: Gottlieb buys house on 156 Lenox Avenue, Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin (now 2370 and 2372 Lenox Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, 2 houses).
January 14, 1876: Auguste (Gussie) Amelia born, Bay View, Wisconsin.
June 1876: Gottlieb's last recorded communion at St. Lucas Church, Bay View, Wisconsin.
Mid 1876 - Mid 1885: Reconstruction, best guess: Gottlieb and Caroline and family went to Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota sometime after mid 1876. Note: Caroline Lietzau married Gustave Pinske on June 11, 1876 in McLeod County Minnesota. On January 7, 1879, Caroline Pein Truher was a Godparent to their son Theodore Hermann at his baptism in Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.
The Truher family eventually migrated to Fossum Township, Polk County, Minnesota by 1880 (Federal Census) where they were shown as living either next door or on the same farm as Gustave and Caroline Pinske. The four children were also there, but Mother Florentine was NOT listed. (This part of Polk County became part of the new Norman County in 1881. Fossum Township is on the eastern border of Norman County, with Wild Rice Township adjacent and to the West).
Between 1880 and 1885, the family moved to Wild Rice Township, Norman County, Minnesota, where they staked and worked their farm. The 1885 special Minnesota State Census shows them in Wild Rice Township, Norman County, Minnesota, again either with the Gustave and Caroline Pinske family, or next door to it (see "Ron Haack", below). Just a short distance away was the Ernest and Johanna Pinske family farm. Again, the four Truher children (August, Charles, Matilde and Augusta are listed, but now Gottlieb's mother Florentine Truher is listed, age 79 and born in Germany.
June 4, 1885: Gottlieb and Caroline Truher sold his house at 156 Lenox Avenue, Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin to brother Jakob Truher for $700. Gottlieb and Caroline are listed as from the town of Wild Rice, Norman County, and Minnesota.
December 24, 1885: United States grants Gottlieb and Caroline their land in Norman County, Minnesota.
June 4, 1886: Gottlieb and Caroline get mortgage on above land from Hiram Upton.
1886: Some major catastrophic event descends upon the Truher family. See the notes on son August Louis Truher where he tells a story of death (?) and his mother Caroline coming down with typhoic fever, rendering her helpless and August forced to learn to cook, etc. Whatever the event, it caused the next several steps in the eventual migration of the Truher's to Minneapolis.
Note: In August of 2000, a Hennepin County Minnesota Probate Court document from the year 1900 was discovered which tells of the committment of Gottlieb to the State Hospital for the Insane at St. Peter, Minnesota. Details below;however, it speaks of a lawsuit "with his brother" about the 1885 time period. Gottlieb never recovered from that episode. At this writing, there are no details about this lawsuit.
September, 27,1886: Gottlieb and Caroline buy 525 Franklin, Hutchinson, and McLeod County, Minnesota. They are listed as from Hennepin County, Minnesota.
December 18, 1886: Gottlieb and Caroline assign land in Norman County, Minnesota to Phelps and Calkins, attorneys for Mr. Upton.
April 17, 1887: Son Charles Edward Truher confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.
October 1888: Daughter Mathilda Truher confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.
April 5, 1891: Daughter Auguste Amalie confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.
April 11, 1891: Norman County, Minnesota sheriff forecloses Gottlieb and Caroline's Norman County land. They still owe $855.35 and they missed a $48 interest payment.
1891/1892: The Minneapolis City Directory lists August Truer, brakeman, as living at 313 10th Avenue North. No mention of the rest of the family.
1892/1893: The Minneapolis City Directory lists at 2932 18th Avenue South: August L. Truer, brakeman, Charles E., brakeman, Gottlieb, Susan (? -Augusta??), folder, Mpls Envelope Co., and Tillie, folder, Mpls. Envelope Co. The family had moved to Minneapolis. Minors and non-working women were not listed in city directories, thus the absence of Caroline.
Note: There is confusion about two addresses, 2930 and 2932 18th Avenue South. 2932 18th Avenue South MAY have become 2930 18th Avenue South by 1900. A Sanborn fire map of 1906 shows the house as 2932, THREE lots north of the east-west alley, just where 2930 stands today. Another possibility is that 2930 and 2932 are really the same house, just downstairs and upstairs. After 1900, 2932 is never mentioned again.
1893/1894: The Minneapolis City Directory now shows at 2932 18th Avenue South: August Truher, conductor, Charles E., brakeman and Gottlieb, but not the women.
November 7, 1894: Gottlieb and Caroline sell 525 Franklin, Hutchinson, and McLeod County, Minnesota.
1894/1895: The Minneapolis City Directory now shows at 2932 18th Avenue South: August Truher, Augusta, seamstress, Charles, brakeman, Gottlieb and Matilda, sewer.
June 1895: The special 1895 Minnesota State Census shows the following: At 2932 18th Avenue South (first floor assumed): Gottlieb Truher, age 65, Caroline, age 56, August, age 28, brakeman, Charles, age 24, brakeman and Gussie, age 19, seamstress.
At 2932 (2nd floor): William F. Frank, age 24, born in New York, Electrician and Matilda Frank, age 22 (Tillie Truher got married)!
At 2930 18th Avenue South (one house north of 2932, no longer there, or see Note above): Albert Frank, age 25, born in Minnesota, Expressman, Ida, age 28, born in Illinois and Sydney Frank, age 2, born in Minnesota (wife and son). It is assumed that Albert was William Franks's brother - verification is needed.
June 16, 1896: Auguste Amelia Truher (daughter) marries William Carl Haack in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, and Minnesota. They will live at 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis, the home of Louis and Amelia Zadach (brother-in-law and sister of William). Louis' father Friederick Wilhelm Gotthilf Zadach and step-mother Florentine (Florence) lived next door at 3032 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis.
November 4, 1896: Son August L. Truher buys 2930 18th Avenue South (old 2932, see above), Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota for $2100 cash plus an assumed mortgage of $1500. (Note: same house only sold for about twice that amount in 1954). This was a 2 family duplex.
January 1, 1898: Grandson Herbert William Haack is born at 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis.
November 27, 1899: Granddaughter Delilah Henrietta Haack is born at 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis.
May 17, 1900: William Carl and Auguste Amelia Haack and their children Herbert William and Delilah Henrietta move into one part of the duplex at 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis.
June 6, 1900: The 1900 Federal Census lists at 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minnesota: William C.Haack, born Nov 1873, cooper, Augusta A. Haack, born Jan, 1875, wife, Herbert, son, born Jan 1898, Delilah Haack, daughter, born Nov. 1899, Gottlieb Truher, born Nov 1831, married 36 years, immigrated 1871, 29 years in USA, not naturalized, retired, Caroline Truher (wife), born Aug 1837, mother of 9 children, 4 still living, August Truher, born Aug 1866 in Germany, not naturalized, railroad conductor. No Charles Edward! Also, William and Matilda Truher Frank had moved.
Note: A picture was discovered in January of 2001 of Gottlieb and Caroline Truher with their daughter Augusta Truher Haack and their granddaughter Delilah H. Haack. It is believed that the photo was made sometime in the Summer of 1900, probably at 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis.
November 27, 1900: There is a committment hearing in Minneapolis, and Gottlieb Truher is committed to the Minnesota State Hospital for the Insane at St. Peter. From the Certificate of Jury:
Gottlieb was not a member of a Church.
When were the first symptoms of this attack manifested, and in what way? Answer: Spring of 1886 after a law suit with brother, study and unusual interpretation of the Bible, excitable, etc.
Is the disease variable, ....? Answer: Yes. Variable in his moods and for a day or two seems rational. The predominant ideas recur at short intervals. On what subject, or in what way is derangement now manifested? (State fully): Answer: Religiosity. Claims infidelity of wife and children. Outbursts of rage and temper towards family quotes Bible as his authority. The Bible tells him that he is to kill his wife and that the time is (to be ?) appointed.
Has the patient sown any disposition to injure others? Answer: Except (?) by frequent threats and claims that the time is coming when all should die.
What is supposed to be the cause of the disease? Answer: Worry over lawsuits in 1886.
The patient said (here state what the patient said to either or both examiners): Talked of his suspicions regarding his wife and family and his religious impressions(?). Excitable, talks loudly and boistrously.
Other facts: Suspicious of neighbors and threats of (?) violence. Is at times vulgar. Has frequently struck(?) his wife (?) insulted her.
Gottlieb was admitted to the State Hospital on November 27, 1900 and was discharged on July 29, 1901. There is no further mention of his mental problems, and no family stories about this episode.
March 10, 1902: August L. Truher (single) sells 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis, to William Carl Haack (and wife Gussie, August's sister) for $1500 plus a mortgage assumption.
April 15, 1902: August converts to Roman Catholicism, changes his first name to Augustus and marries Helen Mary Nellie Barrett in the Church of St. Augustine, Austin, Mower County, Minnesota. He moves to Austin. It can only be imagined the profound affect on Caroline Pein Truher, his mother, who was a staunch Prussian Lutheran and sent August to only the best of Lutheran schools.
June 13, 1902: Grandson Harold Carl Haack is born at 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
December 5, 1904: Gottlieb dies in Minneapolis and was buried in Pioneer Cemetery, Cedar Avenue and Lake Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was exhumed in 1919 and re- buried in the new Haack/Truher plot in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota. (The Milwaukee Railroad appropriated part of Pioneer Cemetery in 1919).
July 24, 1912: Grandson Harold Carl Haack killed by streetcar on Lake Street in Minneapolis, Minnesota and was buried in Pioneer Cemetery, Cedar Avenue and Lake Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was exhumed in 1919 and re-buried along with Gottlieb Truher in the new Haack/Truher plot in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
December 12, 1928: Caroline dies at 2921 18th Avenue South, the home of her daughter Matilda Truher Frank and her husband William L. (across the street and a few doors north of Gussie Truher Haack's home where Caroline had lived for many years). She is buried next to Gottlieb and Grandson Harold Carl Haack in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis.
Ron Haack: On Wednesday afternoon, August 18, 1999, I met Ramona Weaver as she pulled into the Kraft Farm in Wild Rice Township, Norman County, and Minnesota. This is former farm of Gottlieb Truher in the 1880's. Ramona is the daughter of Mrs. Kraft, who died last year. We talked for over an hour. She showed me the Norman County History book with articles on the Pinske family (Ferdinand, Ernest, etc.). The front half of the current house may be original to the Truher era (no proof). I took three photos, two of the house and outbuildings, and one of Ramona. The current address of the farm is Ramona Weaver, 2162 390th Street, Gary, MN 56545.
Ramona showed me the burial site just South and adjacent of the Kraft-Truher farm, on the current Pinske farm, with a monument to Ernest Pinske and historical markers. Because of poor lighting conditions, I returned the next day and took some photos. Ramona gave me a name of Ervine Pinske, man with one arm, living just north of Trinity Lutheran Church in Twin Valley. I failed to connect with Ervine.
There is a little Lutheran Church on Minnesota 200, about one mile East of the Truher homestead; however, Ramona said it started in 1919 and then folded. Records were transferred to Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Manhomen, Minnesota.
The Norman County Recorder's office in Ada stated that Norman County split from Polk County in 1881, which explains the census of 1880 and 1885 differences. There is no record of land purchased by Gottlieb Truher in the Polk County Recorder Office in Crookston, Minnesota. It looks like he staked out the land, homesteaded it and got his land grant later.
When comparing the current Wild Rice and Fossum Township maps side by side, the current Truher farm (the Kraft farm) is in the northeast corner of Wild Rice Township, second section in from the East. Wild Rice Township's northern border is Minnesota Highway 200. The north-south frontal road past the Truher-Kraft farm is Norman County 41 (two miles West of the Wild Rice - Fossum townships border. On Minnesota 200, about four miles East of the Truher-Kraft farm and in Fossum Township lies another Pinske farm. It just may be that the 1880 Federal Census showing the Truher and Pinske clans in Fossum Township, Polk County, is no fluke!
• 2003m1010 READ THIS: How to navigate in this Notebook. √
 To get started, just click on the cover page. You will be be taken to the main Contents page, or go there by using tabs at right of page.

If viewing on a browser, note that links may open in your browser tabs.

IMPORTANT: This document is in Outline format. You navigate differently from a standard text document. You will need to expand or collapse sections of text. To learn how to do this, g
o to the "Introduction, How To" tab section, and read the page "IMPORTANT: How to navigate in this Notebook."
 Come back and check on me occasionally. Let me know if you have a reaction to something you find here.

-- Jack Truher <
jack@truher.net >
2010m0904
 From a content page, jump to various pages by clicking on the diamond at left of each text entry. The year or origin, month, and date of each entry are shown in that order.
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 When in doubt, click on the bullet when you see it inside the notebook, appearing as at left. Each text entry block in this notebook begins with a circular bullet point, which may have a "+" or a "-", or "nothing" inside.

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• 2003m0711 Some voice recordings in this Notebook.
 Play any MP3 voice recordings such as the one just here

• <a href="attachments/NoteTaker-2003_10_07-12_16.mp3">NoteTaker-2003_10_07-12_16.mp3</a>

Recorded Tuesday, October 07, 2003 12:16:14. Duration 00:13
• Thomas Burke, Descendants report √
 Descendants of James Burke
 1 James BURKE Born: Ireland Died: 1866 Dayton, Tippecanoe County Indiana

.. +? Died: New York


.... 2 Thomas BURKE Born: 1831 Bally Griffen, County Tipperary, Ireland Died: April 02, 1883 Richland Center, Wisconsin Burial: April 1883 Catholic Cemetery, Richland Center, Wisconsin Military service: Indiana Regiment, U.S. Civil War


........ +Catherine "Kate" STAPLETON Born: 1835 Bally Griffen, Tipperary County, Ireland Married: June 27, 1857 Tippecanoe County Indiana Died: September 03, 1908 Richland Center, Wisconsin Burial: September 1908 Catholic Cemetery, Richland Center, Wisconsin


.......... 3 Hannorah BURKE Born: 1859 Dayton, Tippecanoe County Indiana


.............. +Patrick MANNING


................. 4 Catherine "Kate" MANNING


................. 4 Timothy Theron MANNING Born: July 07, 1878


..................... +Lydia Mae LEFFLER Married: January 14, 1904


.......... 3 Thomas BURKE Born: December 22, 1861 Dayton, Tippecanoe County Indiana Died: November 19, 1936 Marshall, Wisconsin


.............. +Etta BRIGGS Married: February 26, 1895 Richland Center, Wisconsin


.......... 3 James Daniel BURKE Born: March 06, 1864 Lafayette, Tippecanoe County, Indiana Died: October 15, 1924 Torrence, California Burial: October 1924 Richland Center, Wisconsin


.............. +Catherine Mary "Kate" MURPHY Born: November 13, 1871 Chicago, Illinois Married: November 06, 1888 Richland Center, Wisconsin Died: August 1955 Altadena, California Burial: 1955 Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California


................. 4 Leo Glen BURKE Born: April 29, 1890 Richland Center, Wisconsin Died: April 14, 1964 Pasadena, California, Home of Helen Burke Truher Burial: 1964 Possibly Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California


..................... +Mayme J. STADELE Born: 1895 Married: May 06, 1914 Muscada, Wisconsin Died: 1967


....................... 5 James A. BURKE Born: December 31, 1916 Richland Center, Wisconsin Died: May 1981 Richland Center, Wisconsin


........................... +Helen M. ENGENDORF Born: 1920


................. 4 James Daniel BURKE, Jr. Born: March 24, 1894 Dayton Township, Richland County Wisconsin Died: September 25, 1909 Richland County, Wisconsin


................. 4 Edna Mary BURKE Born: January 15, 1902 Richland County, Wisconsin Died: April 09, 1963 Pasadena, California, Home of Helen Burke Truher Burial: 1963 Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California


..................... +Donald A. NASBY


................. 4 Milo Francis BURKE Born: December 04, 1904 Richland Township, Richland County Wisconsin Died: December 20, 1978 Pasadena, California, Home of Helen Burke Truher Burial: 1978 Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California


..................... +Virginia (?) ALBERTS


....................... 5 Robert BURKE


....................... 5 Bonita BURKE


................. 4 Helen Kathryn BURKE, EdD Born: December 23, 1910 Dayton Township, Richland County Wisconsin Died: January 09, 1988 South Pasadena, California Burial: Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California


..................... +James Wilder TRUHER Born: April 15, 1907 California Married: November 14, 1931 Yuma, AZ Died: December 14, 1990 California Burial: Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California


....................... 5 [1] James Wilder TRUHER, Jr. Born: December 10, 1934


........................... +JoAnn "Joby" NELSON Married: 1956 Divorced: 1984


....................... *2nd Wife of [1] James Wilder TRUHER, Jr.:


........................... +Mary Lou ? Married: Abt. 1987


....................... 5 John Burke "Jack" TRUHER Born: February 05, 1938 Seattle, Washington


........................... +Nancy FORD Born: July 23, 1940 Married: January 29, 1966


....................... 5 Terese Marie TRUHER Born: August 30, 1943 Seattle, Washington Died: August 30, 1943 Seattle, Washington Burial: Catholic Cemetery, Winlock, Washington, near Seattle


....................... 5 Michael Barrett TRUHER Born: February 01, 1947 California


........................... +Sheryl KNOWTON Born: 1950 Married: 1975


.......... 3 Margaret BURKE Born: 1868 Dayton, Tippecanoe County Indiana Died: September 22, 1933 Chicago, Illinois


.............. +John "Jack" O'KEEFE Married: Abt. 1899 Chicago, Cook County, Illinois


.......... 3 John BURKE Born: November 14, 1870 Dayton Township, Richland County Wisconsin Died: January 04, 1944 Richland Center, Wisconsin


.............. +Hannah O'KEEFE Married: 1906 Chicago, Cook County, Illinois


.......... 3 Patrick BURKE Born: May 14, 1873 Richland Center, Wisconsin Died: June 13, 1911 Eagle Township, Richland County Wisconsin


.............. +Elizabeth BURTON


.......... 3 Michael Francis BURKE Born: September 18, 1877 Richland Center, Wisconsin Died: June 13, 1911 Eagle Township, Richland County Wisconsin


.............. +Rose HARRIS Married: November 27, 1902 Richland Center, Wisconsin
• 2003m1007 Vitae (terse) on Jack Truher √
• Vitae on Jack Truher. √

Jack Truher was born in Seattle, Washington in 1938; attended elementary and high school in Pasadena,California; then Stanford University, leaving with a B.S. in physics in 1960. After a few years as a physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and as a reserve missile officer with the United States Army, Jack joined the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in 1965. At SLAC for 31 years, here is how some of
Jack's varied concentrations contributed to various aspects of high energy accelerator and especially magneto-optical beam delivery systems. This work is derived from a branch of applied physics called accelerator physics.

Jack lives in Los Altos, California 94024, at 10569 Creston Drive. Phone is 408-732-1859, Email <
jack@truher.net >.

• 2003m1007 Vitae (terse) on Ron Haack √
 Ron Haack is a 2nd cousin to Jack Truher. Our grandparents, August and Augusta Truher, were siblings. Ron has made many contributions to the genealogies described in this notebook.

Ron Haack was born in Saint Paul, Minnesota in 1937, attended high school in Saint Paul, Macalester College in Saint Paul, then the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis with a five year degree in Electrical Engineering. After a few moves around the Midwest for about 6 years, Ron joined GE in Cincinnati in 1966 in the Aircraft Engine Division, Engine Controls Department. Engine Controls moved to Fort Wayne, Indiana in 1985. Ron moved with it, and has remained there ever since. Ron retired from GE in about 1993.

Ron Haack lives in Fort Wayne, Indiana 46804-1481, at 1715 Kinross Lane; home phone is 219-432-1819 (You will ALWAYS get an answering machine; picked up for recognized callers, if Ron is home).

Vitae on Ron Haack from his email July 7, 2000.
• Florentine Lietzau-Truher, Descendants report for (terse)
   1 Florentine ? Truher-Lietzau (1806 - ) (rhh/jbt)
      1 Gottlieb Truher (1832 - 1904)
          1 August Louis Truher (1866 - 1947)
              1 Helen Mary Truher (1903 - 1981)
              2 Louis Barrett Truher (1904 - 1946)
                  1 Claire Louise Truher (1942 - )
              3 James Wilder Truher (1907 - 19901990)
                  1 James Wilder Truher Jr. (1934 - )
                      1 James Wilder Truher III (1957 - )
                          1 James Wilder Truher IV (1984 - )
                      2 Sarah Lee Truher (1959 - )
                      3 Julie Ann Truher (1960 - )
                      4 Mary Pat Truher (1965 - )
                  2 John Burke Truher (1938 - )
                      1 Nathaniel Luke Truher (1966 - )
                      2 Joel Burke Truher (1968 - )
                      3 Heather Lee Truher (1971 - )
                  3 Terese Marie Truher (1943 - 1943)
                  4 Michael Barrett Truher (1947 - )
              4 Florence May Truher (1909 - 1977)
                  1 Helen Mary Levasseur ( - )
              5 Mary Gertrude Truher Sister (1909 - 1991)
          2 Charles Edward Truher (1870 - 1951)
          3 Matheldie Helene Truher (1873 - 1962)
              1 Carl W. Frank (1895 - 1975)
              2 Herman L.Frank (1900 - ca. 1982)
              3 Arthur A. Frank (1902 - 1975)
                  1 Richard H. Frank (1923 - )
                  2 Mona Hayden (1923 - )
                  3 Mary Hayden (1925 - )
                  4 Kenneth A. Frank (1926 - 1998)
                      1 Chris Frank ( - )
                      2 Kathryn Frank ( - )
                      3 Michael Frank ( - )
                      4 Pat Frank ( - )
                      5 Scott Frank ( - )
          4 Herman Adolph Truher (1874 - 1874)
          5 Julius Albert Truher (1874 - 1874)
          6 Augusta Amelia Truher (1876 - 1953)
              1 Herbert William Haack (1898 - 1961)
                  1 Marlene Marceil Haack (1931 - )
                      1 David Marlin Christofferson (1955 - )
                      2 Mark Allen Christofferson (1958 - )
                      3 Steven Robert Christofferson (1960 - )
                  2 Ronald Herbert Haack (1937 - )
                  3 Allen Harold Haack (1944 - 1973)
              2 Delilah Henrietta Haack (1899 - 1983)
                  1 Marjorie Gray ( - )
                  2 Leonard Lester Deuel Jr. (1921 - 2000)
                      1 Lee Rae Deuel (1945 - )
                          1 Matthew Todd Skinner (1966 - )
                              1 Zackery Joseph Friend- Skinner (1995 - )
                          2 Amanda Millicent Skinner (1968 - )
                      2 Lynn Anne Deuel (1945 - )
                          1 Timothy David Brown (1967 - )
                          2 Christopher Max Brown (1969 - )
                      3 John Wesley Deuel (1947 - )
                          1 Kimberly Deuel (1966 - )
                          2 Gina Deuel (1967 - )
                              1 Braison Moses ( - )
                              2 Jeremy Moses (1986 - )
                          3 Rosalyne Deuel (1982 - )
                          4 Leonard Deuel (1985 - )
                      4 David Gene Deuel (1951 - )
                          1 Amber Mariya Deuel (1975 - )
                  3 Gene Herbert Deuel (1926 - 1985)
                      1 Donelle Deuel ( - )
              3 Harold Carl Haack (1902 - 1912)
      2 Jakob Truher (1836 - 1915)
          1 Carl Wilhelm Friederich Truher (1876 - 1949)
              1 Harry F. Truher ( - )
              2 Clarence J. Truher (1900 - 1965)
                  1 Carol Truher ( - )
                      1 Child One ? ( - )
                      2 Child Two ? ( - )
              3 Dora Emilie Auguste Truher (1902 - 1945)
              4 Lawrence August Truher (1907 - 1983)
                  1 Laurene Evelyn Truher (1944 - )
              5 Evelyn M. Truher (1918 - 1976)
                  1 Dianne Flowers ( - )
                      1 Child Four Pierson ( - )
                      2 Child One Pierson ( - )
                      3 Child Three Pierson ( - )
                      4 Child Two Pierson ( - )
                  2 James Flowers ( - )
                      1 Child One Flowers ( - )
              6 Charles A. Truher (1920 - 1975)
          2 Caroline Wilhelmine Henriette Truher (1877 - 1965)
              1 Nancy Schrot ( - )
              2 Friedrich Georg Schrot (1898 - )
                  1 Beverly Schrot ( - )
              3 Karl Reinhold Schrot (1901 - 1975)
              4 Edwin Otto Wilhelm Schrot (1902 - )
                  1 Ronald Schrot ( - )
              5 Georg Harold Schrot (1905 - 1910)
          3 Auguste Emilie Truher (1879 - )
              1 Walter Karl Fredrich Jenrich (1897 - 1980)
              2 Frieda Karoline Wilhelmine Jenrich (1899 - )
              3 Herbert Jakob Albert Jenrich (1900 - )
              4 Arthur Wilhelm Hermann Jenrich (1902 - )
              5 Edna Flora Karoline Jenrich (1908 - )
              6 Wilhelm Edwin Harry Jenrich (1912 - )
              7 Lorenz Leonard August Jenrich (1913 - )
              8 Harold Ernest Edwin Jenrich (1916 - )
          4 Friedrich Wilhelm August Truher (1881 - )
          5 Wilhelm Herman Truher (1884 - )
          6 August C. Truher (1885 - 19681968)
              1 Norma Emilie Truher (1908 - 1991)
              2 Child ? Truher (1915 - 1915)
          7 Hermann Edward Truher (1888 - )
          8 Flora Helena Emilie Truher (1890 - )
          9 Edwin Franz Jakob Truher (1892 - 1917)
         10 Arthur Reinhold Emil Truher (1894 - 1894)
      3 Johann Lietzau Jr. (1843 - )
          1 Ernest Edward John Lietzau (1869 - )
          2 Olga K. Lietzau (1872 - )
          3 Adolph Lietzau (1873 - )
          4 Albert Otto Lietzau (1875 - )
          5 Emilie Lietzau (1875 - )
          6 Fred Lietzau (1877 - )
          7 Emil Lietzau (1879 - )
          8 Heinrich Amadeus Lietzau (1880 - )
          9 Laura Lietzau (1885 - )
         10 Bertha M. Lietzau (1887 - )
      4 Caroline Lietzau (1849 - )
          1 ? Pinske ( - )
          2 infant one Pinske ( - )
          3 infant two Pinske ( - )
          4 Theodore Hermann Pinske (1878 - )
          5 Hulda Maria Magdalena Pinske (1880 - 1891)
          6 Albert Pinske (1881 - )
          7 Rosalie Johanna Pinske (1884 - )
              1 Palmetta Lauretta Gill (1925 - )
          8 Robert Heinrich Pinske (1885 - )
          9 Herman Pinske (1887 - )
         10 James A. Pinske (1890 - )
         11 Johannes Adolph Reinhold Pinske (1890 - )
----------------------------------------------------
Descendant report created by Gene 4.2.1, Thu, Jul 19, 2001
• Florentine-Lietzau Truher, Descendants of (verbose)
 Descendants of Florentine Truher-Lietzau (rhh/jbt)

1 [9] Florentine TRUHER-LIETZAU Born: 1806 Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland) (?)

.. +Martin TRUHER Born: Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland) (?) Married: 1830 Died: Aft. 1836

.... 2 Gottlieb TRUHER Born: November 21, 1832 Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland) Died: December 05, 1904 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: 1904 Pioneer Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota

........ +Caroline PEIN Born: August 01, 1838 About 18 miles South Berlin, Germany Married: 1859 Danzig, Prussia (now Gdanz, Poland)??? Died: December 12, 1928 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: December 1928 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota, (Haack Plot)

.......... 3 August Louis "Gus" TRUHER Born: August 03, 1866 Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland) (?) Died: February 02, 1947 Honolulu, Hawaii (home of Helen Mary Truher Alderman) Burial: 1947 Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California

.............. +Helen Mary Nellie BARRETT Born: May 14, 1876 Austin, Minnesota Married: April 15, 1902 St. Augustine Roman Catholic Church, Austin, Minnesota Died: September 1945 Seattle, Washington Burial: 1945 Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California

................. 4 Helen Mary TRUHER Born: January 28, 1903 Austin, Minnesota Died: March 10, 1981 Santa Clara, California

..................... +Hugh ALDERMAN

................. 4 Louis Barrett TRUHER Born: September 22, 1904 Austin, Minnesota Died: February 14, 1952 San Diego, California Burial: 1946 Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California

..................... +Clara D. KOVAL Born: August 24, 1909 Died: January 28, 2000 Tacoma, Pierce County Washington Burial: February 03, 2000 Calvary Cemetery, Tacoma, Washington

....................... 5 Claire Louise TRUHER Born: 1942

................. 4 James Wilder TRUHER Born: April 15, 1907 Austin, Minnesota Died: December 14, 1990 Los Angeles, California Burial: Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California

..................... +Helen Kathryn BURKE, Ed.B., A.M., Ed.D. Born: December 23, 1910 Dayton Township, Richland County Wisconsin Married: November 14, 1931 Yuma, AZ Died: January 09, 1988 South Pasadena, California Burial: Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California

....................... 5 [1] James Wilder TRUHER, Jr. Born: December 10, 1934

........................... +JoAnn "Joby" NELSON Married: 1956 Divorced: 1984

.............................. 6 James Wilder TRUHER III Born: August 30, 1957

.................................. +Kathy ? Married: 1982

.................................... 7 James Wilder TRUHER IV Born: June 22, 1984 Loma Linda University Hospital, Loma Linda, San Bernadino County California

.............................. 6 Sarah Lee TRUHER Born: March 02, 1959

.............................. 6 Julie Ann TRUHER Born: July 26, 1960

.............................. 6 Mary Pat TRUHER Born: October 08, 1965

.................................. +Phil ALBERT Married: May 14, 1994 All Saints Episcopal Church, Pasadena, California

.................................... 7 Isabelle Kathryn ALBERT Born: August 16, 2000 California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, San Francisco County California

....................... *2nd Wife of [1] James Wilder TRUHER, Jr.:

........................... +Mary Lou ? Married: Abt. 1987

....................... 5 John Burke "Jack" TRUHER Born: February 05, 1938 Seattle, Washington

........................... +Nancy Ann FORD Born: July 23, 1940 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Married: January 29, 1966 San Antonio de Padua Mission, Jolon, California

.............................. 6 Nathaniel Luke TRUHER Born: December 20, 1966 Stanford Hospital, California

.............................. 6 Joel Burke TRUHER Born: June 06, 1968 Stanford Hospital, California

.................................. +Tammy ZIEHM Born: 1965 Married: August 02, 1996 San Francisco City Hall, California

.................................... 7 Ryan Ziehm TRUHER Born: March 01, 2003 Sequoia Hospital, Redwood City, California

.............................. 6 Heather Lee TRUHER Born: October 07, 1971 Stanford Hospital, California

.................................. +Nathaniel COUSINS Born: February 21, 1970 Married: June 27, 1998

.................................... 7 Amanda Claire COUSINS Born: August 19, 2000 University of Chicago Hospital, Chicago, Cook County Illinois

....................... 5 Terese Marie TRUHER Born: August 30, 1943 Seattle, Washington Died: August 30, 1943 Seattle, Washington Burial: St. Francis Xavier Mission Cemetery, Toledo, Lewis County Washington

....................... 5 Michael Barrett TRUHER Born: February 01, 1947 California

........................... +Sheryl KNOWTON Born: 1950 Married: 1975

................. 4 Florence May TRUHER Born: November 23, 1909 Tacoma, Washington Died: July 1977 San Francisco, California

..................... +Edward ? LEVASSEUR

....................... 5 Helen Mary LEVASSEUR

........................... +Greg HOMER

................. 4 Mary Gertrude TRUHER Born: November 23, 1909 Tacoma, Washington Died: October 07, 1991 Marian Residence, 124 South College Drive, Santa Maria, California 93454

.......... 3 Charles Edward TRUHER Born: August 11, 1870 Wisconsin Died: September 27, 1951 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: September 29, 1951 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.............. +Kate REED Married: Bef. 1913 Dubuque, Iowa Died: December 09, 1938 Dubuque, Dubuque County Iowa Burial: December 1938 Mount Olivet Cemetery, Dubuque, Dubuque County Iowa

.......... 3 Matheldie Helene "Aunt Till" TRUHER Born: January 22, 1873 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: October 06, 1962 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: October 09, 1962 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.............. +William F. FRANK Born: February 17, 1870 Brooklyn, New York Married: 1893 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: June 18, 1939 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

................. 4 Carl William FRANK Born: December 17, 1895 Hopkins, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: July 28, 1975 Burial: 1975 Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Hennepin County Minnesota

..................... +Dorothea Emilie Sophia "Dora" PINSKE Born: 1897 Married: November 27, 1919 Died: September 16, 1988 Burial: September 1988 Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Hennepin County Minnesota

................. 4 Arthur August FRANK Born: September 08, 1897 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: July 28, 1990 Houston, Harris County Texas Burial: 1990 Sunset Memorial Park, Minneapolis, Hennepin County Minnesota

..................... +Edith Anna Marie HAYDEN Born: December 10, 1897 Colorado Springs, El Paso County Colorado Married: October 25, 1921 Minneapolis, Hennepin County Minnesota Died: October 06, 1989 Houston, Harris County Texas Burial: 1989 Sunset Memorial Park, Minneapolis, Hennepin County Minnesota

....................... 5 Richard Hayden FRANK Born: October 23, 1922 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

........................... +Cleo Marie TREES Born: May 24, 1925 Belmond, Wright County Iowa Married: September 11, 1949 Belmond, Wright County Iowa

.............................. 6 Bruce Richard FRANK Born: June 22, 1951

.................................. +Deborah Ann LEWIS Born: October 12, 1953

.................................... 7 Justin Bruce FRANK Born: May 01, 1980 Tacoma, Washington

.................................... 7 Jared James FRANK Born: July 26, 1984

.............................. 6 [2] Gregory James FRANK Born: April 18, 1953

.................................. +Unknown ONE Married: Aft. 1973 Divorced: Bef. 1985 Before marriage of Gregory to Unknown Two

.............................. *2nd Wife of [2] Gregory James FRANK:

.................................. +Unknown TWO Married: Aft. 1985 Divorced: Bef. 1990 Before marriage of Gregory to Serap Cadan.

.................................... 7 Nicholas FRANK

.............................. *3rd Wife of [2] Gregory James FRANK:

.................................. +Serap CANDAN Born: December 22, 1967 Ankara, Turkey Married: Abt. 1990

.................................... 7 Alexandria Marie FRANK Born: December 10, 1991 Germany

.................................... 7 Alistair Taner FRANK Born: September 29, 1996 Alexandria, Virginia

....................... 5 Kenneth Arthur FRANK Born: August 18, 1926 Proctor, Saint Louis County Minnesota Died: November 10, 1998 Ely, Saint Louis County Minnesota Military service: Army Air Corps, World War II

........................... +Nancy Ann SHOREEN Born: November 10, 1930 Evanston, Cook County Illinois Married: March 11, 1950 Hopkins, Hennepin County Minnesota

.............................. 6 Scott Hayden FRANK Born: October 29, 1951 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.................................. +Sandra Jane SWENSON Married: November 10, 1973 Minneapolis, Hennepin County Minnesota

.................................... 7 Jennifer Noel FRANK Born: December 25, 1976 Edina, Hennepine County Minnesota

.................................... 7 Bryan Russel FRANK Born: September 06, 1980 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.................................... 7 Jason Kenneth FRANK Born: October 15, 1981 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.............................. 6 Kathryn FRANK Born: June 23, 1954 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: June 24, 1954 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.............................. 6 Christopher Bradley FRANK Born: October 27, 1955 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.................................. +Sanjuana Rojas CARREON Married: September 09, 1987 Houston, Harris County Texas

.................................... 7 Christian Arthur FRANK Born: June 20, 1996 Houston, Harris County Texas

.............................. 6 Michael Everett FRANK Born: January 03, 1964 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.................................. +Laurel Annette FLANERY Married: August 25, 1990 Irving, Dallas County Texas

.................................... 7 Aubrey Rose FRANK Born: December 22, 1998 Tomball, Harris County Texas

.............................. 6 Patrick Arthur FRANK Born: January 03, 1964 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

................. 4 Herman L. FRANK Born: March 14, 1900 Died: January 04, 1982 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: January 06, 1982 Sunset Memorial Park, Minneapolis, Hennepin County Minnesota

..................... +Emma SCHLENTZ Born: 1896 Married: November 27, 1919 Died: March 15, 1982 St. Louis Park, Hennepin County Minnesota

.......... 3 Herman Adolph TRUHER Born: July 07, 1874 Died: July 22, 1874 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: 1874 Pilgrims Rest Cemetery, 34th and Forest Home, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Julius Albert TRUHER Born: July 07, 1874 Died: July 21, 1874 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: 1874 Pilgrims Rest Cemetery, 34th & Forest Home, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Augusta Amelia "Gussie" TRUHER Born: January 14, 1876 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: August 10, 1953 University of Minnesota Hospital, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: August 1953 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis (Haack Plot)

.............. +William Carl "Will" HAACK Born: November 20, 1873 Hokah, Houston County, Minnesota Married: June 16, 1896 Frederic S(?)ievess, German Lutheran Pastor, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: October 01, 1943 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: October 1943 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis (Haack Plot)

................. 4 [3] Herbert William "Herb" HAACK Born: January 01, 1898 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: February 14, 1961 5217 13th Avenue South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: February 17, 1961 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis

..................... +Marie "Babe" EDMONDSON Married: June 18, 1919 Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota Divorced: March 20, 1928 Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota.

................. *2nd Wife of [3] Herbert William "Herb" HAACK:

..................... +Eleanor Augusta Ida MUELLING Born: February 24, 1902 Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota Married: July 12, 1930 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: June 14, 1977 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: June 20, 1977 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Adj. Haack Plot

....................... 5 [4] Marlene Marceil HAACK Born: October 08, 1931 Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota

........................... +Donald George WONDRA Married: 1949 Esterville, Iowa Divorced: 1950 Saint Paul, Ramsey County Minnesota

....................... *2nd Husband of [4] Marlene Marceil HAACK:

........................... +Marlin Carroll CHRISTOFFERSON Born: February 01, 1927 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Married: April 18, 1953 Faith Lutheran Church, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota Died: August 23, 1990 Bloomington, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: August 1990 Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Fort Snelling, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.............................. 6 David Marlin CHRISTOFFERSON Born: February 22, 1955 Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota

.............................. 6 Mark Allen CHRISTOFFERSON Born: May 30, 1958 ?

.............................. 6 Steven Robert CHRISTOFFERSON Born: March 08, 1960 ?

....................... 5 Ronald Herbert "Ron" HAACK Born: June 18, 1937 Saint Paul, Ramsey County Minnesota

....................... 5 Allen Harold HAACK Born: September 19, 1944 Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota Died: December 1973 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: December 19, 1973 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, near Haack Plot

........................... +Nancy SMITH Born: Unknown ? Married: August 31, 1973 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: Unknown ?

................. 4 [5] Delilah Henrietta "Dee" HAACK Born: November 27, 1899 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: August 20, 1983 Seattle, Washington

..................... +Albert BARAGAR Married: Seattle, Washington

................. *2nd Husband of [5] Delilah Henrietta "Dee" HAACK:

..................... +Leonard Lester DEUEL Born: June 20, 1892 Kirwin, Phillips County Kansas Married: April 20, 1919 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: February 19, 1967 Seattle, Washington

....................... 5 Leonard Lester DEUEL, Jr. Born: April 19, 1921 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: May 17, 2000 At his home, Olympia, Washington

........................... +Peggy Louise PARKINSON Born: October 26, 1925 Riverside, California Married: March 17, 1945 Santa Ana, California, First Congregational Church

.............................. 6 Lee Rae DEUEL Born: December 18, 1945 Orange, California

.................................. +Elihu Barnes SKINNER Born: January 18, 1938 New Britain, Connecticut Married: August 17, 1965 Amarillo, Texas

.................................... 7 Matthew Todd SKINNER Born: January 18, 1966 Amarillo, Texas

........................................ +Angelique FRIEND

........................................... 8 Zackery Joseph FRIEND-SKINNER Born: March 15, 1995 Olympia, Washington

.................................... 7 Amanda Millicent SKINNER Born: December 11, 1968

.............................. 6 [6] Lynn Anne DEUEL Born: December 18, 1945

.................................. +Gregory BROWN Married: Bef. 1967 Divorced: Aft. 1969

.................................... 7 Timothy David BROWN Born: November 30, 1967 Tacoma, Washington

.................................... 7 Christopher Max BROWN Born: May 07, 1969 Tacoma, Washington

.............................. *2nd Husband of [6] Lynn Anne DEUEL:

.................................. +Dale FRANCIS Married: Aft. 1969 Divorced: Aft. 1975

.............................. *3rd Husband of [6] Lynn Anne DEUEL:

.................................. +John REDIFER Married: Aft. 1980 Divorced: Aft. 1985

.............................. *4th Husband of [6] Lynn Anne DEUEL:

.................................. +Robert OTIS Married: Aft. 1986

.............................. 6 [7] John Wesley DEUEL Born: April 10, 1947

.................................. +Susan JENSEN Married: Bef. 1966 Divorced: Aft. 1968

.................................... 7 Kimberly DEUEL Born: July 31, 1966

.................................... 7 Gina DEUEL Born: October 07, 1967

........................................ +Joseph MOSES

........................................... 8 Jeremy MOSES Born: May 28, 1986

........................................... 8 Braison MOSES

.............................. *2nd Wife of [7] John Wesley DEUEL:

.................................. +Trisha ? Married: Aft. 1970 Divorced: Aft. 1975

.............................. *3rd Wife of [7] John Wesley DEUEL:

.................................. +Mary KANABAK Born: November 27, 1957 Married: Aft. 1980

.................................... 7 Rosalyne DEUEL Born: June 13, 1982

.................................... 7 Leonard P. DEUEL Born: June 26, 1985

.............................. 6 David Gene DEUEL Born: July 14, 1951 Orange, California

.................................. +Cara MCCUTCHAN Married: July 13, 1974 Divorced: 1976 Kenyon, Minnesota

.................................... 7 Amber Mariya DEUEL Born: October 02, 1975

........................................ +David KOCEMBA Married: September 11, 1999 McCutchan Farm, Minnesota

....................... 5 Gene Herbert DEUEL Born: June 28, 1926 Seattle, Washington (?) Died: January 1985 Cary, North Carolina

........................... +Loretta HATFIELD

.............................. 6 Donelle DEUEL

................. 4 Harold Carl HAACK Born: June 13, 1902 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: July 24, 1912 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: 1912 Pioneer Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota

.... 2 Jakob TRUHER Born: July 28, 1836 Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland) Died: April 16, 1915 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: April 19, 1915 Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

........ +Emilie NEHRING Born: December 29, 1852 Married: December 12, 1875 St. Lucas Lutheran Church, Bayfield, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: August 07, 1931 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: 1931 Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Carl Wilhelm Friederich "Charles" TRUHER Born: October 19, 1876 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: November 08, 1949 Chicago, Illinois (?)

.............. +Bertha Amelia WILKE Born: January 27, 1877 Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin Married: June 17, 1899 St. Lucas Lutheran Church, Bayfield, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: February 21, 1952

................. 4 Harry F. TRUHER

..................... +Mary ?

................. 4 Clarence J. TRUHER Born: March 25, 1900 Died: April 1965 Chicago, Illinois (?)

..................... +?

....................... 5 Carol TRUHER

........................... +?

.............................. 6 Child One ?

.............................. 6 Child Two ?

................. 4 Dora Emilie Auguste TRUHER Born: August 16, 1902 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: February 1945 2515 North Talman Avenue, Chicago, Illinois

................. 4 Lawrence August TRUHER Born: September 09, 1907 Milwaukee, Wisconsin Died: November 25, 1983 Battle Creek Community Hospital, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Michigan Burial: November 28, 1983 Acacia Park Cemetery, 7800 West Irving Park Road, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois 60634-2135, 773-625-7800

..................... +Jean MARKLEY Born: July 10, 1912 Chicago, Illinois Married: June 06, 1936 Geneva, Illinois Died: August 02, 1987 Battle Creek, Michigan Burial: 1987 Acacia Park Cemetery, 7800 West Irving Park Road, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois 60634-2135, 773-625-7800

....................... 5 Laurene Evelyn "Laurie" TRUHER Born: June 11, 1944 Chicago, Illinois

........................... +Robert SWANSON Born: April 13, 1940 Married: November 26, 1966 Our Saviour's Lutheran Church, Chicago, Illinois

................. 4 Evelyn M. TRUHER Born: March 17, 1918 Died: February 1976 Island Lake, Illinois

..................... +William David FLOWERS Born: July 23, 1918 Died: August 28, 1976 Island Lake, Illinois

....................... 5 [8] Dianne Carle FLOWERS

........................... +Robert PIERSON

....................... *2nd Husband of [8] Dianne Carle FLOWERS:

........................... +Dennis EVANS

.............................. 6 Timothy EVANS

.............................. 6 Suzanne EVANS

.............................. 6 Daniel EVANS

....................... 5 James David FLOWERS

........................... +Terree ?

.............................. 6 Kelly FLOWERS

................. 4 Charles A. TRUHER Born: May 20, 1920 Died: March 1975 Chicago, Illinois

.......... 3 Caroline Wilhelmine Henriette TRUHER Born: October 16, 1877 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: February 24, 1965

.............. +Charles SCHROT Married: June 26, 1897 St. Lucas Lutheran Church, Bayfield, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: May 02, 1955

................. 4 Nancy SCHROT

..................... +? RAEDLEIN

................. 4 Friedrich Georg SCHROT Born: June 30, 1898

..................... +RUTH

....................... 5 Beverly SCHROT

........................... +? WILL

................. 4 Karl Reinhold SCHROT Born: February 28, 1901 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: January 1975

................. 4 Edwin Otto Wilhelm SCHROT Born: August 29, 1902 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

..................... +Alma ?

....................... 5 Ronald SCHROT Born: Unknown

................. 4 Georg Harold SCHROT Born: October 19, 1905 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: September 03, 1910 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Auguste Emilie TRUHER Born: July 16, 1879 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.............. +Franz JENRICH Married: January 09, 1897 156 Lenox Street, Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

................. 4 Walter Karl Fredrich JENRICH Born: March 02, 1897 Died: December 1980

................. 4 Frieda Karoline Wilhelmine JENRICH Born: January 12, 1899

................. 4 Herbert Jakob Albert JENRICH Born: September 06, 1900

................. 4 Arthur Wilhelm Hermann JENRICH Born: March 25, 1902 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

................. 4 Edna Flora Karoline JENRICH Born: September 01, 1908 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

................. 4 Wilhelm Edwin Harry JENRICH Born: May 27, 1912 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

................. 4 Lorenz Leonard August JENRICH Born: August 06, 1913 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

................. 4 Harold Ernest Edwin JENRICH Born: December 28, 1916 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Friedrich Wilhelm August TRUHER Born: March 07, 1881 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Wilhelm Herman "Willie" TRUHER Born: March 30, 1884 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.............. +Anna SCHEWE Born: 1885 Married: October 26, 1910 St. Lucas Lutheran Church, Bayfield, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.......... 3 August C. TRUHER Born: August 26, 1885 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: April 20, 1968 Burial: 1968 Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.............. +Emma WILDEBRANDT Born: July 08, 1885 Died: January 10, 1973 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: 1973 Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

................. 4 Norma Emilie TRUHER Born: March 10, 1908 Town Lake, Wisconsin Died: August 1991

..................... +Edward KLUG

................. 4 Child ? TRUHER Born: 1915 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: November 12, 1915 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: November 1915 Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Hermann Edward TRUHER Born: June 08, 1888 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: November 03, 1941 Burial: November 1941 Wood National Cemetery, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Flora Helena Emilie TRUHER Born: March 04, 1890 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.............. +Leonhard SCHMIDT Married: October 15, 1912 St. Lucas Lutheran Church, Bayfield, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Edwin Franz Jakob TRUHER Born: February 05, 1892 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: April 11, 1917 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: April 15, 1917 Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Arthur Reinhold Emil TRUHER Born: February 24, 1894 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: March 12, 1894 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

*2nd Husband of [9] Florentine TRUHER-LIETZAU:

.. +Johann LIETZAU, Sr. Born: 1812 Married: Abt. 1842

.... 2 [10] Johann LIETZAU, Jr. Born: 1843

........ +?

.... *2nd Wife of [10] Johann LIETZAU, Jr.:

........ +Amelia BURANDT Born: 1842

.......... 3 Ernest Edward John LIETZAU Born: 1869

.......... 3 Olga K. LIETZAU Born: 1872

.......... 3 Adolph LIETZAU Born: 1873

.......... 3 Albert Otto LIETZAU Born: 1875

.......... 3 Emilie LIETZAU Born: October 28, 1875 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Fred LIETZAU Born: 1877

.......... 3 Emil LIETZAU Born: 1879

.......... 3 Heinrich Amadeus LIETZAU Born: 1880

.......... 3 Laura LIETZAU Born: 1885

.......... 3 Bertha M. LIETZAU Born: 1887

.... *3rd Wife of [10] Johann LIETZAU, Jr.:

........ +Enestine Emma ?

.... 2 Caroline LIETZAU Born: October 10, 1849 Germany Died: November 11, 1923 Ada, Norman County Minnesota Burial: November 1923 St. John's Lutheran Cemetery, Green Meadow Twp, Norman County Minnesota

........ +Gustave E. PINSKE Born: October 22, 1847 Germany Married: June 11, 1876 Glencoe, McLeod County Minnesota Died: December 31, 1911 Crookston Hospital, Crookston Minnesota Burial: St. John's Lutheran Cemetery, Green Meadow Twp, Norman County Minnesota

.......... 3 Theodore Hermann PINSKE Born: December 31, 1878 Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota Died: May 28, 1965 Burial: STRAND CEM

.............. +MATTA HABEDANK Born: August 13, 1881 Married: May 18, 1892 Died: February 10, 1931 Burial: STRAND CEM, Norman, MN

................. 4 MERLIN PINSKE

................. 4 AGNES EMMA PINSKE Born: October 15, 1905 Died: 1982

..................... +FRED JANUSCH Married: August 01, 1929 OGEMA, MN Died: Aft. 1982

....................... 5 JANUSCH

....................... 5 JANUSCH

....................... 5 JANUSCH

....................... 5 JANUSCH

................. 4 LOUIS IRWIN KARL PINSKE Born: December 26, 1907 Died: 1973 MPLS, MN

..................... +ALICE SCHAUFBUCK

................. 4 BERNHARDT GUSTAV WILHELM PINSKE Born: January 09, 1909 Died: Bef. January 29, 1989

..................... +GLADYS ELLINGSWORTH Born: GARY, Norman, MN

....................... 5 PINSKE

....................... 5 PINSKE

....................... 5 PINSKE

....................... 5 PINSKE

....................... 5 PINSKE

....................... 5 PINSKE

................. 4 ALICE FRIEDERIKE CAROLINE PINSKE Born: January 22, 1910

..................... +ED SCHAUFBUCK Died: 1987

....................... 5 SCHAUFBUCK

................. 4 DELILAH VIOLA PINSKE Born: June 23, 1911

..................... +GEORGE STANFORD

....................... 5 STANFORD

................. 4 MABEL MINNIE CATHERINE PINSKE Born: August 22, 1912 Died: September 09, 1961 WHITE MEM HOSP, LOS ANGELES, LOS ANGELES, CA Burial: ,,,MN

................. 4 IRWIN THEODORE HENRY PINSKE Born: March 14, 1914

................. 4 VIOLA CHRISTINE PINSKE Born: September 03, 1916

..................... +CLARENCE WIEGMANN

................. 4 MARJORIE ELEANORA PINSKE Born: February 09, 1925

..................... +LEN HUTCHINS

.......... 3 Hulda Maria Magdalena PINSKE Born: June 18, 1880 Died: May 14, 1892 Wild Rice Township, Norman County Minnesota

.............. +BULOW

................. 4 BULOW

................. 4 BULOW

................. 4 BULOW

.......... 3 Albert PINSKE Born: November 26, 1881 Died: January 21, 1927

.......... 3 Rosalie Johanna PINSKE Born: February 16, 1884 TWIN VALLEY, NORMAN CO. MN USA Died: October 08, 1959 INGLEWOOD, LOS ANGELES, CA, USA Burial: HARMONY SECTION, FOREST LAWN, GLENDALE, CA

.............. +Harry Leroy GILL Born: 1878 Married: June 12, 1907 ADA, NORMAN CO, MN Died: November 27, 1959 LOS ANGELES, LOS ANGELES, CA Burial: HARMONY SECTION, FOREST LAWN, GLENDALE

................. 4 HALLEY HARRISON GILL Born: September 19, 1910 ADA, Norman, MN Died: March 17, 1982 ADA, Norman, MN Burial: ADA CEM, ADA, Norman, MN

................. 4 CORRIAL BEATRICE GILL Born: May 29, 1912 ADA, Norman, MN Died: May 29, 1995

................. 4 GENEVIEVE ROSABELLE GILL Born: September 19, 1915 ADA, Norman, MN

................. 4 DE VOIL SARAH CAROLINE GILL Born: November 17, 1917 ADA, Norman, MN

................. 4 ELSIE LORRAINE GILL Born: July 16, 1920 ADA, Norman, MN

................. 4 DONALD CHASWILL GILL Born: July 26, 1922 ADA, Norman, MN

................. 4 Palmetta Lauretta "Pat" GILL Born: 1925

..................... +Walter Otto "Walt" SCHONBORG Born: 1923

................. 4 VIOLET VELORIS GILL * Born: January 28, 1927 GREEN MEADOW TWN, NORMAN CO, MN, USA

..................... +KERMIT HOWRIE "Tim" ENANDER * Born: March 18, 1922 PAYNESVILLE, STEARNS CO, MN, USA Married: November 09, 1946 BETHEL LUTH CH, LOS ANGELES, LOS ANGELES CO, CA

....................... 5 ANITA KAY ENANDER Born: December 05, 1952 LOS GATOS, SANTA CLARA CO, CA

........................... +MICHAEL GENE TUCKER Born: March 17, 1951 DAVENPORT, SCOTT CO, IA Married: February 04, 1978 SAN JOSE, SAN JOSE CO, CA

.............................. 6 ERICA MICHELLE TUCKER Born: December 16, 1988

.............................. 6 LINNEA KRISTINE TUCKER) Born: December 16, 1988 STANFORD HOSP, CA Died: December 17, 1988 STANFORD HOSP, CA

....................... 5 LAURA LINNEA ENANDER Born: June 22, 1955

.......... 3 Robert Heinrich PINSKE Born: October 20, 1885 Died: August 18, 1893

.......... 3 Herman August PINSKE Born: April 30, 1887 Died: December 06, 1918

.......... 3 Johannes Adolph Reinhold PINSKE Born: May 05, 1890 Died: October 22, 1890

.......... 3 James A. PINSKE Born: Aft. 1890 Died: Aft. 1890

.......... 3 ? PINSKE Born: Unknown Died: Abt. 1900



&
&
&
• Wednesday, October 20, 2010
• Truher_Gottlieb Kaszubs Jones Island, Milwaukee, 1872 as property custodians
• 1 - Gottlieb-sumCourtCases1872-1902-e.doc , dated 2009-12-24 is a MSword file which Jack has made to gather a court case, pointing to a living and property stewardship arrangement which Gottlieb established within the first year or two of his arrival as an immigant.

Two court cases involving Gottlieb Truher:

Supreme Court of Wisconsin


Aug Term 1902
Illinois Steel Co. v. Budzisz, 115 Wis. 68

-- and another case --

March 1901
Illinois Steel Company v. Bilot. [109 Wis. 418, 85 n. w. 402.]
"Bilot" really is "Bilot", no spelling error.


quotes and sources collected by Jack Truher, 2009-12-24


See page 74 of
Illinois Steel Co. v. Budzisz


Report 115, Cases Determined in the Supreme Court of Wisconsin,
July 19 -- November 28, 1902, by Frederic K. Conover,
Official Reporter.Chicago Callaghan and Company 1903.

http://books.google.com/books?dq=Truher%20wisconsin&q=Gottlieb&id=DUkMAAAAYAAJ&output=text&pg=PA74

by following that link, then searching "Gottlieb" in left search box we find that the name, Gottlieb, appears only once in the whole book, and on page 74: on the case:

Illinois Steel Co v. Budzisz, 115 Wis. 68

"Prior to 1872 several persons, strangers to tho patent title, occupied parts of the island. The adverse holdings were apart from each other. They were, as stated by some of the witnesses, all over the island. One of the settlers was
Gottlieb Truher. He sold his place to Jacob Muza in 1872 for $100, not making any written conveyance. Muza occupied such place, with slight interruptions, continuously from the time he purchased the same till the commencement of this action. Some time prior to 1890, and not earlier than 1885, Muza designated a place on the island for one Peer to locate. The latter made a fill at the place designated, of sufficient size for the foundation of a house, and constructed one thereon. Thereafter he enlarged the filled space and inclosed the same on three sides with a fence, leaving an opening at the back part of his lot, and thereafter continued to extend the fill till he occupied the entire premises described in the complaint. He occupied the same continuously from the time the house was built till 1890, when he sold his right to the premises to the defendant, who immediately took possession thereof and occupied the same till the commencement of this action.
"There was evidence to the effect that
Truher, in 1872, claiming possession of and dominion over the entire island, sold all his rights to Muza, and that thereafter the latter exercised dominion over the territory continuously till this action was commenced, except as he surrendered portions thereof from time to time to persons desiring to locate homes thereon; that in 1887 there were upwards of 200 settlers on the island; that the number largely increased thereafter before the commencement of this action. The acts of possession which witnesses testified that Muza exercised were as follows: As soon as ho purchased of Truher he explored the island, traveling part of the time on foot and part of the time in a boat. Immediately thereafter he commenced to improve the island. He continued to improve it till this action was commenced. The improvements were made chiefly by permitting persons to settle on the island, not exacting any compensation therefor except that they should aid in making the territory suitable for habitations. All the settlers did more or less work in improving the island under Muza's direction. The brush on the island was all cleared off and put into the low places. Filling was done by using ashes and all material that could be obtained. Some trees were planted. Some structures were made to prevent inroads from the waters of the lake. During all the time it was generally understood that Muza controlled the island. Persons who desired to settle thereon looked to him for directions in improving the territory. Undesirable characters 'were prohibited by him from' coming upon the island. Some persons who came to fish and hunt were compelled by him to go away. Truher, being called as a witness, testified that he never claimed any interest in any part. of the island except that occupied by his house, and that he did not sell or pretend to sell any other interest to Muza."


========================== ==========================



We also have a second link, next page, which I think Michael sent Jack is:

http://books.google.com/books?output=text&id=gyA8AAAAIAAJ&dq=truher&q=truher#v=snippet&q=truher&f=false

AMERICAN STATE REPORTS, CONTAINING THE CASES OF GENERAL VALUE AND AUTHORITY
SUBSEQUENT TO THOSE CONTAINED IN THE "AMERICAN 
DECISIONS" AND THE "AMERICAN REPORTS,"

DECIDED IN THE COURTS OF LAST RESORT OF THE SEVERAL STATES.
BY A. C. FREEMAN Vol LXXXIIL

where I have here extracted about Gottlieb in the attached rtf file.What follows is the language that tells us most about Gottlieb:
case begins on page 905
quote begins page 908 of ILLINOIS STEEL CO. v. BILOT. [109 Wis. 418, 85 N. W. 402.]
really is Bilot

"In 1872 some nine families resided on the territory called "Jones island." It was then, and had been theretofore and was thereafter, all covered by water, except as artificially changed. In 1872 one
Truher had a house on the submerged territory, supported in some way in the shallows, or resting on a piece of made land, but just how did not clearly appear. Truher pretended to exercise dominion over the entire territory and prevented any person from locating thereon without his permission. In 1872 Truher made a verbal transfer of his house to one Jacob Muza, and authorized the latter to exercise the same control that he had over the entire territory, but there was no paper transfer, Muza took such possession as was practicable, and exercised dominion as Truher did. Muza testified that when Truher gave him the property it was all submerged by water and mud as deep as over his head; and that the particular place allotted by him to Bilot was of no use until artificially raised above the level of the water."
...

skip much text argumentation until page 919, then read on:
...

"Complaint is made because, in the statement of facte upon which the former opinion was based, it was said that
Truher pretended to exercise dominion over the entire territory, and prevented any person from locating thereon without his permission. Notwithstanding the confident assertion of counsel that there is no such evidence in the record, either in a literal sense or within the range of reasonable inferences, we still think that, on the whole, what was stated and is so criticised is a fair inference from the testimony of Muza. Certainly Truher, according to Muza's evidence, pretended to own the island. He was living there when Muza came upon the scene. He asserted the right of dominion over the island. He pretended to sell and deliver possession thereof to Muza, asserting at the time that no one could take it from him but Lake Michigan. "
 3 - GottliebGoons JonesIsland1870c.rtfd, dated 2009-12-26 is another file with describes the circumstance.
Gottlieb's Goons - Dominion on Jones Island 1870
collected facts on the first Truher American Immigrant, adding a little speculation on the side, by Jack Truher

Cousin Ronald H. Haack wrote:
>Anyone like to hazard a guess as to where on attached Earth map is that Gottlieb marsh land?
Ron Haack
mailto:cookierhh@verizon.net >

Jack Responds on 2009m1226 at 7:35 a.m.


No question: The property in question was called Jones Island. That original triangular space has been expanded by fill to become an industrial area with a sewage treatment plant, among other things. Jones Island sits as an ithsmuth just East of the University of Wisconsin Great Lakes Research Facility (increase magnification on last image of attached PDF).

The PNG attachments have text which I captured a few days ago from the record in my summary, which we have all seen. One reads on these PNG the circumstance under appeal.
Without complete certainty, I understand the appeals case in Wisc supreme court as follows:

In the 1872-1902 era squatters could sometimes assume Prima Facie title by exercising what I would call de-facto ownership by acceptance of peers and a record of good stewardship. Gottlieb may have implied some such presumed rights over the whole island, when he accepted $100 from Musa, who then assumed such a role as senior among squatters. For $100, Musa said he took ownership of Gottlieb's house and also the whole of the Island. Over time, things changed gradually until Illinois Steel Co became the dominant controlling operator on the growing Island. At this point, Musa attempted to assert his presumed Prima Facie title as a plaintiff in a civil suit against Illinois Steel, which suit was rejected in a court case that Haack-Truher in 2009 has not yet discovered. Musa appealed.

In the course of testimony to the original court hearing, Musa insisted that Gottlieb represented himself as a Prima Facie owner of Jones Island. Gottlieb said contrarily that he exercised only had such prima facie relationship to his house and perhaps its immediate property, not the entirety of Jones Island.

Musa appealed to the Wisconsin superior court, resulting in the record that we are reading in Wisconsin Superior court and American State Report google books. I don't recall reading a resounding rejection of Musa appeal in the record of appeal, but I assume that's what he got. Illinois Steel is presumed by me to have won the appeal. By the definition below, absence of of endorsement of a plaintiff's appeal by a court means the plaintiff lost.

Gottlieb's apparent refusal to join Musa may have been the basis for the bad vibes with Gottlieb that Ron has learned about elsewhere, and/or there may have been other tensions about a later property that Gottlieb had shared interest.

----------------------------------------------------

prima facie [Latin, On the first appearance.] A fact presumed to be true unless it is disproved.

In common parlance the term prima facie is used to describe the apparent nature of something upon initial observation. In legal practice the term generally is used to describe two things: the presentation of sufficient evidence by a civil claimant to support the legal claim (a prima facie case), or a piece of evidence itself (prima facie evidence).

For most civil claims, a plaintiff must present a prima facie case to avoid dismissal of the case or an unfavorable directed verdict. The plaintiff must produce enough evidence on all elements of the claim to support the claim and shift the burden of evidence production to the respondent. If the plaintiff fails to make a prima facie case, the respondent may move for dismissal or a favorable directed verdict without presenting any evidence to rebut whatever evidence the plaintiff has presented. This is because the burden of persuading a judge or jury always rests with the plaintiff.

http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/prima+facie

-------------------------------------

"In 1872 some nine families resided on the territory called "Jones island." It was then, and had been theretofore and was thereafter, all covered by water, except as artificially changed. In 1872 one Truher had a house on the submerged territory, supported in some way in the shallows, or resting on a piece of made land, but just how did not clearly appear. Truher pretended to exercise dominion over the entire territory and prevented any person from locating thereon without his permission."

We read in Illinois Steel Co. v. Bilot - about Jones Island.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jones_Island,_Milwaukee

We can find a nice historical map of Jones Island, at the terminus of the Menominee River and Kinnickinnic River..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menominee_River

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinnickinnic_River_%28Milwaukee_River%29

http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/whi/fullRecord.asp?id=6921

-------------------------------------------------

Jack writes again on 2009m1226 at 1:07 p.m.
on subject:

"Gottlieb's Goons and Musa De Niro

brother MICHAEL TRUHER wrote:
This whole thing is really weird but interesting. why would Gottlieb turn "states evidence" so to say? Gottlieb and Musa had some dispute apparently.

Ron said recently that he recalled that both Gottlieb and Jakob were employed by the Steel Company. The company could easily make it worthwhile that one or both of the brothers could be paid off or otherwise benefit from a favorable testimony in a legal contest for prime industrial waterfront property at the intersection of major riverways. Since Gottlieb arrived first, and had established himself, he would have had advantage over Jakob in such a back room negotiation, breeding the sort of competition for advantage that might damage a relationship.

Gottlieb's living on a swamp fill is not likely to have been a choice that Caroline and 6 year old August would have endorsed, or even endured. The wind whistling off Lake Michigan had to be unimaginable for long periods. The company might have planted August there among the squatters, specifically to favor a later settlement in favor of the company and eject the squatters.

It seems unlikely that laborers Gottlieb and Jakob would be situated in their own two story family dwellings not long off the boat, unless they had exploited some angle. We know that Jakob never rose above a laborer. Gottlieb as well, though he was a failed farmer for a decade in another comfortable house, until he moved his family into a third in Minneapolis. Pretty good for laborers: one with like 5 children and the other with eight or whatever.

All speculation, but more than possible, given the stories of family tension that persisted for generations.

Attached (at bottom) is picture Ron sent of Jakobs nearby family home and grave stone.


=======================
Jack writes again at 2:53 pm
on subject:

Poles vs German tension on Jones Island.

remember this segment of court text:

"In 1872 some nine families resided on the territory called "Jones island." It was then, and had been theretofore and was thereafter, all covered by water, except as artificially changed. In 1872 one Truher had a house on the submerged territory, supported in some way in the shallows, or resting on a piece of made land, but just how did not clearly appear. Truher pretended to exercise dominion over the entire territory and prevented any person from locating thereon without his permission."

Jack continues:P

following the speculations just offered, how indeed did Gottlieb "exercise dominion" or "prevent any person". He did not appear in pictures to be particularly dominant physical personage. Perhaps the company provide the muscle. Rather than actually living on the property with his family, it would make more sense that Gottlieb spent enough time there to look legitimate to earlier squatters, with constant visitors and company from company enforcers, almost certainly armed, because it was "hunters and fishing" excursioners that Gottlieb is reported to have repelled. All it would take is a few big fellows with attitude and weapons.

If the company lost interest, or the racket looked shakey, or the game was exposed and stopped by police, perhaps Musa came on the scene, with a more subtle approach. Managements change. Later Musa may have thought he was on his own, and so behaved in court.

Gottlieb's mental instability may have come from emotional trauma for living conflicted by threat of retaliation in response to his use of goon squads. What better place to escape than the Plains of Minnesota. Why not settle a distance away, more comfortably, after things cooled off. Minneapolis would be far enough.

Who will write the novel on this screenplay? Robert De Niro could be old man Musa telling the story, about how everybody got something out of the deal alive. Good ending, even if our Gottlieb went nuts for a time. He probably started out a little crazy.
============================

Brother Jim writes
also on 2009m1226 at 1:39 p.m.


There was a lot going on back then…….

*Bay View Massacre*
*From Wikipedia*
Wisconsin Historical Marker

The *Bay View Massacre* (sometimes also referred to as the *Bay View Tragedy*) was the culmination of events that began on Saturday May 1, 1886 when 7,000 building-trades workers joined with 5,000 Polish laborers who had organized at St. Stanislaus Catholic Church to strike against their employers, demanding an eight hour work day.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milwaukee,_Wisconsin

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strike_action

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight-hour_day

By Monday, these numbers had increased to over 14,000 workers that gathered at the Milwaukee Iron Company rolling mill in Bay View
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay_View,_Milwaukee
They were met by 250 National Guardsmen under order from Governor Jeremiah M. Rusk to shoot to kill any strikers who attempted to enter. Workers camped in the nearby fields and the Kosciuszko Militia arrived by May 4
to "shoot to kill" any strikers who attempted to enter.

Early the next day the crowd, which by this time contained children, approached the mill and were fired upon. Seven people died as a result, including a thirteen-year-old boy. Several more were injured during the protest.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeremiah_McLain_Rusk

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/May_4

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay_View_Massacre#cite_note-0#cite_note-0

Jim Truher

=================

Jack writes:

One of the tensions here is that between Poles and Germans at the time that Gottlieb arrives on Jones Island. The text below explains that Germans arrived on Jones Island in "1870". Residents remained as squatters until 1940, when the island was surrounded by fill, as part of the city shipping port, undoubtedly by eminent domain.

Magnify a google map of Jones Island and you learn about a tiny park on the Island named after the earlier-than-Gottlieb Polish fishermen, Kaszubes among others:

http://wikimapia.org/1191775/Kaszubes-Park

Kaszubes-Park

"This is the smallest park in the milwaukee county park system. The park is named after the Kaszubes who once inhabited Jones Island before it became a peninsula. The park is marked by an anchor with a plaque and the stump from a large willow tree that until recently was at the center of the park. The park has been landscaped since the demise of the tree, and a portion of the dismembered trunk can be seen on the other side of the chain link fence bordering the park."

and from

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neighborhoods_of_Milwaukee

Jones Island
Main article: Jones Island, Milwaukee

"Jones Island is a peninsula located at the Milwaukee Harbor. It began as a fishing village populated by Polish settlers from the Kaszub region as well as some German immigrants in 1870. The settlers made their living by fishing Lake Michigan. Having never officially obtained a deed for the land, they were considered squatters by the City of Milwaukee and evicted in the 1940s. The city then proceeded to make way for a shipping port as part of an inner harbor design.

"The area is now heavily industrialized, containing only a few mature trees. Jones Island hosts much of the city's municipal services, including the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District. The area supports the Hoan Bridge and includes a shipping port, the Port of Milwaukee."

In support of my earlier screenplay, explain how a German in 1870s manages to take dominion over an island long inhabited by a dozen polish fishing families. Not done without muscle. The prejudice that the Truher's had for Poles was explained to me at length as a child. -- Jack

=============================
2009m1227

Jack writes again on Gottlieb's Kaszubian friends from Koscierzyna.

We learn from this exercise the Poles from Kaszub were dominant as fishermen on Jones Island in 1870, which became an important connection in 1870-72 for arriving immigrant Gottlieb Truher. It is reasonable to think that Gottlieb had known Kaszub people near Danzig from which he claimed to emigrate, and the first port of departure on the ship which he used, along with wife Caroline and son, August.

We find the Kaszubs in Pomerania, the term which Elsie Brink used from her childhood memory, in a conversation with me nearly a decade ago.

We are led to

http://www.ka-na.org/kaszubia.html

which is a web site all about the Kaszub people and their place of origin. From the first link,

http://www.ka-na.org/rekowski.html

read:

"The heart of Kaszuby would be around the cities (10 - 15 thousand) of Kartuzy and Koscierzyna for the central and southern Kashubs and around the larger city of Wejherowo in the region adjacent to the peninsula of Hel for the northern Kashubs."

This is pay dirt. I have been looking for the Truher city of origin near Danzig for a decade.

My conversation with Anita Enander, a few years ago, (a Gill descendent of Florentine Truher's 2nd husband, Lietzau), directed me most clearly to Koscierzyna (German Berent), and two or three other nearby villages, still there today in Poland (which I have noted elsewhere).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ko%C5%9Bcierzyna

There are too many connections now. The place to look for European records on the Truher-Lietzau families is in Koscierzyna.


-===============================

2009m1227
about 8:00 a.m.

Jack writes again on Gottlieb's Kaszubian friends from Koscierzyna.

We learn from this exercise the Poles from Kaszub were dominant as fishermen on Jones Island in 1870, which became an important connection in 1870-72 for arriving immigrant Gottlieb Truher. It is reasonable to think that Gottlieb had known Kaszub people near Danzig from which he claimed to emigrate, and the first port of departure on the ship which he used, along with wife Caroline and son, August.

We find the Kaszubs in Pomerania, the term which Elsie Brink used from her childhood memory, in a conversation with me nearly a decade ago.

We are led to

http://www.ka-na.org/kaszubia.html

which is a web site all about the Kaszub people and their place of origin. From the first link,

http://www.ka-na.org/rekowski.html

read:

"The heart of Kaszuby would be around the cities (10 - 15 thousand) of Kartuzy and Koscierzyna for the central and southern Kashubs and around the larger city of Wejherowo in the region adjacent to the peninsula of Hel for the northern Kashubs."

This is pay dirt. I have been looking for the Truher city of origin near Danzig for a decade.

My conversation with Anita Enander, a few years ago, (a Gill descendent of Florentine Truher's 2nd husband, Lietzau), directed me most clearly to Koscierzyna (German Berent), and two or three other nearby villages, still there today in Poland (which I have noted elsewhere).


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ko%C5%9Bcierzyna


=================================
Jack wrote around noon 2009m1227

-------------------------

Jim sent us the following link and story from Wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay_View_Massacre

James Truher wrote:
There was a lot going on back then…….
> Bay View Massacre From Wikipedia Wisconsin Historical Marker

-------------------------

The Bay View Massacre (sometimes also referred to as the Bay View Tragedy) was the culmination of events that began on Saturday May 1, 1886 when 7,000 building-trades workers joined with 5,000 Polish laborers who had organized at St. Stanislaus Catholic Church in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to strike against their employers, demanding an eight-hour work day.
Jack adds: This story points out an important clarification:

Reading in German-Polish history over what became Polish Territory after WW2 includes comments that Germans dominated commercial life, and were generally thus advantaged by comparison to their Polish neighbors. (Dad would sometimes say that the Truhers came from the Polish Corridor).The point is made by published descriptions that the Germans there did not mix with Poles, nor integrate, nor intermarry in numbers. Instead the German were a separatist elite. This separatism was finally punctuated at the end of WW2, when many German civilians fled the region by crowding onto transport carriers on the Baltic toward West Germany. These unarmed, civilian transport ships were sunk by angry Poles, and nearly all passengers died.

The "7000 building-trades workers" were most likely German, with perhaps a minority of English. Milwaukee was known as perhaps the most popular German point of immigration. Laborers of the time would have been Polish or Irish in some local mix. Segregation was in part by training and experience, but also enforced by importing values of the European Guild system.

But there is a possible source of tension here. Jakob was always listed as "laborer" on census data, and I think Gottlieb as well. If the Truher brothers were working along the down-trodden Poles, no wonder they were playing a high stakes game, and perhaps we have another explanation for Gottlieb to "get out of Dodge" in 1886 when labor strikes became a shooting gallery.

On another branch of the family:

One such "skilled tradesman" elsewhere: Nellie Truher's Austin-Minnesota father Barrett was a career brick mason who worked on all the Austin municipal structures, and others. Probably some of those pictured (attached)
That was his legacy. Mother HBT sent us an obituary or wrote separately about that. I found a series of Historical books on Austin, Minnesota that were for sale perhaps in 2002 or so, when I nearly bought the book for the late 19th Century period. They are out of print now, and I find no obvious source. (Someday on Google Books)

http://www.ci.austin.mn.us/mayors/history.html
Nellie Truher (August's wife) probably got her teaching credential locally:

"In 1897 Charles Boostrom opened the Southern Minnesota Normal College and Austin School of Commerce. " (or it's predecessor).

http://www.epodunk.com/cgi-bin/genealogyInfo.php?locIndex=20823

==========================

Jack wrote again 2009m1228 about 0800 hours

Michael sent us a link to the Kaszubian origins:


http://www.jstor.org/pss/20147702



Michael found that article (image attached) which emphasizes the early Kaszubians' IndoEuropean origins, traced as far back as 2200 BC, and that their language is closely related to slavs, poles, etc. Like our male line, they came out of the steppes north of the Caspian Sea, Kazackhstan, central Asia.

Kaszubians could indeed have been carriers of our male line on that detour some 10 thousand years ago out of Africa that delayed our arrival, perhaps indeed to 2000 BC when the Kaszubians arrived in Eastern Europe. If so, they had 4000 years to mix with the Earlier Cro-Magnon Europeans on a propagation task that only takes a few minutes.



Recall I had a genetic test done by the National Geographic Society, which determined that the Truher male line out of Africa did not follow the dominant European path, as did the Germanic Tribes.



Nat Geo found the male Truher line (and the Kaszubians') carry a genetic marker M17, unique to that detour, as follows from Nat Geo:



"Haplogroup R1a originated about 10,000 years ago, most likely on the
grassy steppes of the Ukraine or southern Russia. Its defining
genetic marker, M17, first appeared in a man of the M173 lineage.
His descendents spread from Europe to the Middle East, India, and
even Iceland. Early M17 peoples were nomadic steppe farmers and
possibly the first to domesticate the horse, which might have eased
their numerous migrations. From the Czech Republic to Siberia, and
south through Central Asia, some 40 percent of all men are members
of this haplogroup.



"This interesting line of descent may be responsible for the birth of
Indo-European languages. The world's most widely spoken language
family includes English, the Romance Languages, Farsi, and various
Indian tongues. But many Indo-European languages share similar words
for animals, plants, tools, and weapons―suggesting a common ancestor
that linguists call proto-Indo-European.



"Some linguists believe that the nomadic Kurgan people were the first
to speak proto-Indo-European languages, some 5,000 to 10,000 years
ago. Geneticists subsequently theorize that these people may have
been descendents of M17. The Indo-European time line and linguistic
distribution interestingly mirror this lineage's genetic and
physical journey.



"Further language parallels are seen in India where speakers of
Indo-European languages, such as Hindi, are predominately M17.
Speakers of India's unrelated Dravidian languages show much lower
frequencies of this marker―even when they live in close proximity to
one another. These data suggest a striking relation between the
spread of language and the arrival of a unique genetic lineage
brought to India by migrants from the steppes.



----------------------------

The same M173 genetic signature occurs in more than half the Levites of Ashkenazi descent, Jews. Dad might have questioned that finding.


-- Jack

Picture which follows is of Gottlieb's brother, Jakob's house and gravestone.


















































• 2 - Gottlieb-goonsDominion.doc is a filed dated 2009-12-25 which explains the setting in an email exchange between Ron Haack and Jack Truher in 2010.

Ronald H. Haack wrote:
> Anyone like to hazard a guess as to where on attached Earth map is that Gottlieb marsh land?
>
> Ron Haack
>
cookierhh@verizon.net <mailto:cookierhh@verizon.net >

Jack Responds on 2009m1226 at 7:35 a.m.

No question: The property in question was called Jones Island. That original triangular space has been expanded by fill to become an industrial area with a sewage treatment plant, among other things. Jones Island sits as an ithsmuth just East of the University of Wisconsin Great Lakes Research Facility (increase magnification on last image of attached PDF).

The PNG attachments have text which I captured a few days ago from the record in my summary, which we have all seen. One reads on these PNG the circumstance under appeal.
Without complete certainty, I understand the appeals case in Wisc supreme court as follows:
In the 1872-1902 era squatters could sometimes assume Prima Facie title by exercising what I would call de-facto ownership by acceptance of peers and a record of good stewardship. Gottlieb may have implied some such presumed rights over the whole island, when he accepted $100 from Musa, who then assumed such a role as senior among squatters. For $100, Musa said he took ownership of Gottlieb's house and also the whole of the Island. Over time, things changed gradually until Illinois Steel Co became the dominant controlling operator on the growing Island. At this point, Musa attempted to assert his presumed Prima Facie title as a plaintiff in a civil suit against Illinois Steel, which suit was rejected in a court case that Haack-Truher in 2009 has not yet discovered. Musa appealed.

In the course of testamony to the original court hearing, Musa insisted that Gottlieb represented himself as a Prima Facie owner of Jones Island. Gottlieb said contrarily that he exercised only had such prima facie relationship to his house and perhaps its immediate property, not the entirety of Jones Island.

Musa appealed to the Wisconsin superior court, resulting in the record that we are reading in Wisconsin Superior court and American State Report google books. I don't recall reading a resounding rejection of Musa appeal in the record of appeal, but I assume that's what he got. Illinois Steel is presumed by me to have won the appeal. By the definition below, absence of of endorsement of a plaintiff's appeal by a court means the plaintiff lost.

Gottlieb's apparent refusal to join Musa may have been the basis for the bad vibes with Gottlieb that Ron has learned about elsewhere, and/or there may have been other tensions about a later property that Gottlieb had shared interest.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

prima facie [Latin, On the first appearance.] A fact presumed to be true unless it is disproved.

In common parlance the term prima facie is used to describe the apparent nature of something upon initial observation. In legal practice the term generally is used to describe two things: the presentation of sufficient evidence by a civil claimant to support the legal claim (a prima facie case), or a piece of evidence itself (prima facie evidence).

For most civil claims, a plaintiff must present a prima facie case to avoid dismissal of the case or an unfavorable directed verdict. The plaintiff must produce enough evidence on all elements of the claim to support the claim and shift the burden of evidence production to the respondent. If the plaintiff fails to make a prima facie case, the respondent may move for dismissal or a favorable directed verdict without presenting any evidence to rebut whatever evidence the plaintiff has presented. This is because the burden of persuading a judge or jury always rests with the plaintiff.

http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/prima+facie

------------------------------------------------------------------------


"In 1872 some nine families resided on the territory called "Jones island." It was then, and had been theretofore and was thereafter, all covered by water, except as artificially changed. In 1872 one Truher had a house on the submerged territory, supported in some way in the shallows, or resting on a piece of made land, but just how did not clearly appear. Truher pretended to exercise dominion over the entire territory and prevented any person from locating thereon without his permission."

We read in Illinois Steel Co. v. Bilot - about Jones Island.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jones_Island,_Milwaukee

We can find a nice historical map of Jones Island, at the terminus of the Menominee River and Kinnickinnic River..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menominee_River

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinnickinnic_River_%28Milwaukee_River%29

http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/whi/fullRecord.asp?id=6921

------------------------------------------------------------------------
===============================================
Jack writes again on 2009m1226 at 1:07 p.m.
on subject: "Gottlieb's Goons and Musa De Niro

MICHAEL TRUHER wrote:
This whole thing is really weird but interesting. why would gottlieb turn "states evidence" so to say? gottlieb and musa had some dispute apparently.

Ron said recently that he recalled that both Gottlieb and Jakob were employed by the Steel Company. The company could easily make it worthwhile that one or both of the brothers could be paid off or otherwise benefit from a favorable testimony in a legal contest for prime industrial waterfront property at the intersection of major riverways. Since Gottlieb arrived first, and had established himself, he would have had advantage over Jakob in such a back room negotiation, breeding the sort of competition for advantage that might damage a relationship.

Gottlieb's living on a swamp fill is not likely to have been a choice that Caroline and 6 year old August would have endorsed, or even endured. The wind whistling off Lake Michigan had to be unimaginable for long periods. The company might have planted August there among the squatters, specifically to favor a later settlement in favor of the company and eject the squatters.

It seems unlikely that laborers Gottlieb and Jakob would be situated in their own two story family dwellings not long off the boat, unless they had exploited some angle. We know that Jakob never rose above a laborer. Gottlieb as well, though he was a failed farmer for a decade in another comfortable house, until he moved his family into a third in Minneapolis. Pretty good for laborers: one with like 5 children and the other with eight or whatever.

All speculation, but more than possible, given the stories of family tension that persisted for generations.

Attached (again) is picture Ron sent of Jakobs nearby family home and grave stone.

image
================================================
Jack writes again at 2:53 pm
on subject: Poles vs German tension on Jones Island.

remember this segment of court text:

"In 1872 some nine families resided on the territory called "Jones island." It was then, and had been theretofore and was thereafter, all covered by water, except as artificially changed. In 1872 one Truher had a house on the submerged territory, supported in some way in the shallows, or resting on a piece of made land, but just how did not clearly appear. Truher pretended to exercise dominion over the entire territory and prevented any person from locating thereon without his permission."

following the speculations just offered, how indeed did Gottlieb "exercise dominion" or "prevent any person". He did not appear in pictures to be particularly dominant physical personage. Perhaps the company provide the muscle. Rather than actually living on the property with his family, it would make more sense that Gottlieb spent enough time there to look legitimate to earlier squatters, with constant visitors and company from company enforcers, almost certainly armed, because it was "hunters and fishing" excursioners that Gottlieb is reported to have repelled. All it would take is a few big fellows with attitude and weapons.

If the company lost interest, or the racket looked shakey, or the game was exposed and stopped by police, perhaps Musa came on the scene, with a more subtle approach. Managements change. Later Musa may have thought he was on his own, and so behaved in court.

Gottlieb's mental instability may have come from emotional trauma for living conflicted by threat of retaliation in response to his use of goon squads. What better place to escape than the Plains of Minnesota. Why not settle a distance away, more comfortably, after things cooled off. Minneapolis would be far enough.

Who will write the novel on this screenplay? Robert De Niro could be old man Musa telling the story, about how everybody got something out of the deal alive. Good ending, even if our Gottlieb went nuts for a time. He probably started out a little crazy.
====================================================

Brother Jim writes also on 2009m1226 at 1:39 p.m.


There was a lot going on back then…….


*Bay View Massacre*


*From Wikipedia*

Wisconsin Historical Marker

The *Bay View Massacre* (sometimes also referred to as the *Bay View Tragedy*) was the culmination of events that began on Saturday May 1, 1886 when 7,000 building-trades workers joined with 5,000 Polish laborers who had organized at St. Stanislaus Catholic Church <
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Stanislaus_Catholic_Church_%28Milwaukee,_Wisconsin%29 > in Milwaukee, Wisconsin <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milwaukee,_Wisconsin > to strike <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strike_action > against their employers, demanding an eight-hour work day <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight-hour_day >.

By Monday, these numbers had increased to over 14,000 workers that gathered at the Milwaukee Iron Company rolling mill in Bay View <
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay_View,_Milwaukee >. They were met by 250 National Guardsmen under order from Governor Jeremiah M. Rusk <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeremiah_McLain_Rusk > to "shoot to kill" any strikers who attempted to enter. Workers camped in the nearby fields and the Kosciuszko Militia arrived by May 4 <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/May_4 >. Early the next day the crowd, which by this time contained children, approached the mill and were fired upon. Seven people died as a result, including a thirteen-year-old boy.^[1] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay_View_Massacre#cite_note-0#cite_note-0> Several more were injured during the protest.

Jim Truher



====================================================


One of the tensions here is that between Poles and Germans at the time that Gottlieb arrives on Jones Island. The text below explains that Germans arrived on Jones Island in "1870". Residents remained as squatters until 1940, when the island was surrounded by fill, as part of the city shipping port, undoubtedly by eminent domain.

Magnify a google map of Jones Island and you learn about a tiny park on the Island named after the earlier-than-Gottlieb Polish fishermen, Kaszubes among others:


http://wikimapia.org/1191775/Kaszubes-Park

Kaszubes-Park

"This is the smallest park in the milwaukee county park system. The park is named after the Kaszubes who once inhabited Jones Island before it became a peninsula. The park is marked by an anchor with a plaque and the stump from a large willow tree that until recently was at the center of the park. The park has been landscaped since the demise of the tree, and a portion of the dismembered trunk can be seen on the other side of the chain link fence bordering the park."

and from
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neighborhoods_of_Milwaukee

Jones Island
Main article: Jones Island, Milwaukee

"Jones Island is a peninsula located at the Milwaukee Harbor. It began as a fishing village populated by Polish settlers from the Kaszub region as well as some German immigrants in 1870. The settlers made their living by fishing Lake Michigan. Having never officially obtained a deed for the land, they were considered squatters by the City of Milwaukee and evicted in the 1940s. The city then proceeded to make way for a shipping port as part of an inner harbor design.

"The area is now heavily industrialized, containing only a few mature trees. Jones Island hosts much of the city's municipal services, including the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District. The area supports the Hoan Bridge and includes a shipping port, the Port of Milwaukee."

In support of my earlier screenplay, explain how a German in 1870s manages to take dominion over an island long inhabited by a dozen polish fishing families. Not done without muscle. The contempt that the Truher's had for Poles was explained to me at length as a child.
 4 - Gottlieb-islandPropertyMilwaukee-Budzisz.doc

Wisc Reports 115 Supreme Court Budzisz Gottlieb 1902m0619-1128 is the folder hold filename = Gottlieb-islandPropertyMilwaukee-Budzisz.doc . This is another MSword .doc file which Jack created to document our discovery of Gottlieb's relationship to Jones Island, at the juncture of 2 major rivers on the port of Milwaukee.



Report 115, Cases Determined in the Supreme Court of Wisconsin, July 19 -- November 28, 1902

Illinois Steel Ca v.Budzisz, 115 Wis. 6& Illinois Steel Company, Appellant, vs. Bodzisz and wife, Respondents.
April 5―September 23, 1902.

(1-4) Public lands: Swamp lands or lakef

Evidence: Original survey: Court and jury. (5-12) Adverse possession: Evidence: Presumptions: Continuity of disseisin: Re-entry by owner: Attornment: Marsh or overflowed lands.

1. The official platting of lands by authority of the United States,

indicating the character thereof as regards whether swamp or marsh lands or lands covered by the waters of a lake, as the same appeared to the official surveyors at the time the original survey thereof was made, is prima facie evidence as to their then character in fact in an action involving the question of whether they were a part of the public domain and subject to sale to private parties.

2. A prima facie case made by evidence of the character indicated

in the preceding paragraph, after the lapse of a term of years so long that it is difficult to establish definitely, if at all, from the mouths of witnesses, the conditions existing at the time of the original survey, should be deemed conclusive in the absence of clear and satisfactory evidence to the contrary.

3. A prima facie case made in the manner indicated in the first

paragraph should not be deemed so disturbed as to reasonably permit a finding contrary thereto, by evidence of witnesses whose personal knowledge does not reach back further than to within ten years of the time of the original survey and who do not agree between themselves as to the conditions during the time covered by the testimony, there being evidence of changes during the time intervening between the survey and the period covered by their testimony, which will account for the difference between the conditions claimed to have been observed by them and those apparently discovered by the government surveyors.

4. Mere flat, marshy lands along a river bank, submerged In many

or most places by water on a level, substantially, with that of the river,―the stream, with its bed, banks and current, being well defined through the entire territory,―cannot be legitimately considered as having the physical characteristics of the bed of a lake or the legal characteristics thereof, especially where the lands were surveyed and sold as part of the government domain.

Illinois Steel Co. v. Budzisz, 115 Wis. 68.

5. The facts essential to adverse possession must be established by clear and satisfactory evidence, the presumptions being In favor of the true owner till facts are so established indicating continued disseisin of such owner for the full period necessary to divest him of his title. The foregoing rule is not satisfied by mere general statements of witnesses not based on facts warranting them, nor in the face of facts conclusively established rendering adverse possession not within reasonable probabilities.

6. The facts, that during substantially the whole period of an alleged adverse possession of land the alleged hostile possessor exercised no more dominion over one part of the land than of another, that many persons located thereon and appropriated parts thereof in severalty for homes without consulting him or recognizing him as proprietor in any way, that he made no objection to their conduct as an invasion of his rights, and that ho never treated the premises as his property in the manner that an owner naturally would, are inconsistent as a matter of law with adverse possession by such alleged possessor, and such facts being established, they should rule the controversy as to such adverse possession as a matter of law.

7. If an owner of land be disseised thereof by another, any notori
ous re-entry by the former in person or by his authorized 'agent for the purpose of dispossessing the disseisor, will effectively interrupt and put an end to the latter's adverse possession, re-. gardless of the length of time the interruption continues.

8. That which actually breaks the continuity of adverse possession

ends it for all purposes. The disseisor of the true owner may, by a fresh disseisin, start a new period of adverse possession, but cannot thereby obtain any benefit whatever from prior possession.

9. The essentials of an entry effective to break an adverse posses
sion will vary according to the character of the premises involved.

10. A re-entry of a mere casual or secret character will not Inter

rupt an adverse possession. The re-entry, to have that effect, must be animo clamandi, and either known to the occupant or characterized by acts or circumstances from which knowledge on his part would be reasonably Inferred.

11. If an adverse occupant of land attorns to the true owner the dis
seisin of the latter is thereby interrupted.

12. Entry by the true owner, upon premises not physically occupied

adversely so as to permit physical disturbance thereof, the premises being marsh or overflowed land not Inclosed and having no artificial objects thereon maintained by the adverse occupant, susceptible of physical, visible interference, and a survey Illinois Steel Co. v. Budzisz, 115 Wis. 68.

of the premises, stakes being located to Indicate the bound-
aries thereof, and exploring and traversing the premises from
day to day for a considerable period of time, animo clamandi,
so as to reasonably charge the adverse occupant with knowl-
edge that his possession is challenged and that an opportunity
exists for him to vindicate the same if he desires, is sufficient
to break the continuity of the disseisin.
[Syllabus by Mabshall, J.]

Appeal from a judgment of the circuit court for Milwaukee county: Eugene S. Elliott, Circuit Judge. Reversed.

Action of ejectment to recover possession of part of government lot 2, section 33, town 7, range 22 E., in Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, particularly described in the complaint, which is in the usual form. The answer contains a general denial and a claim of title in the defendants by adverse possession.

The following was established by the evidence: The section referred to was surveyed as part of the public domain of the United States prior to the year 1835. That part east of the east meander line of the Milwaukee river was designated as lots 1 and 2, lot 2 being the southerly part thereof. The course of the river, as per the first government survey, and a second made in 1836, and other surveys since made and maps admitted in evidence, from the north boundary line of the section to the outlet of the river into Lake Michigan at the southerly end of lot 2, is as follows: Southeasterly from said north boundary to a point where the east meander line of the river reaches to within about 300 feet of the lake at a point north of the east and west center line of the section ; thence southwest about forty-three rods; thence south southeast about sixty-two rods; thence east to Lake Michigan. In a state of nature the territory hetween the meander ljne on the east and that on the west side of that part of the section between the outlet of the river and an artificial channel from the river to the lake, constructed after the government surveys before mentioned, about one half mile north of the Illinois Steel Co. v. Budzisz, 115 Wis. 68. natural outlet, consisted of a long sandy ridge of land from 100 to 300 feet wide on tho east side, and wet, marshy land on the west side, the ridge and low marshy land being separated by a bayou connecting with the river at the south and north ends thereof. The territory west of the bayou was highest at the north end. From as early as 1845 it was mostly covered with water of sufficient depth for navigation, in many if not most places, by canoes and rowboats. The water, generally, was too deep for marsh grass to grow in. The land, where submerged, was generally covered by weeds, flags and wild rice, but the growth was not so dense as to prevent navigation with boats. The land on the west side of the river, for a considerable distance, was of the same marshy nature. In 1835 the water was not as high within a foot or two as later. The low land was covered mostly with marsh grass. It had the appearance of and was called a marsh. Although the water became higher in subsequent years, so that weeds and flags and wild rice to some extent took the place of the marsh grass, the territory continued to be called a marsh. That part of fractional section 33 east of the Milwaukee river, since the time of the government survey, has commonly been called Long Point. Daniel Darnell was the first person to have any private interest therein. It took his name to some extent, being called "Darnell's Float." From about 1845, for a few years, a shipyard was operated west of the north end of the bayou, by a man named Jones. From that, the territory between the bayou and the east meander line of the river came to be called "Jones Island." In 1835 the entire territory between the river and the lake was examined by Daniel Wells, Jr., and others, with a view of purchasing the same. The land consisted of seventy-seven acres and a fraction. The result of such examination was that Wells purchased an interest in government lots 1 and 2. The entire section was entered at the government land office by Daniel Darnell July 30, 1835. Illinois Steel Co. v. Budzisz, 115 Wig. 68.

About that time he assigned his certificate of entry and interest in the land to Albert G. Ellis, to whom the land was patented as early as 1838.

The meander lines, as established by the government survey, are not shown by the evidence produced on the trial. They are as follows: Commencing at the meander post between sections 28 and 33 on the west bank of Lake Michigan, S. 11 chains, S. 5 degrees E. 51 chains, south 10^ degrees E. 18 chains to the mouth of the Milwaukee river and a meander post there set on the lake shore. From such post S. 79 degrees W. 2 chains, N. 6 degrees W. 9.25 chains, N. 42 degrees W. 8
chains to the mouth of the bayou; N. 44 degrees W. 16 chains, N. 5 chains, N. 37 degrees E. 3^ chains, N. 44 degrees E. 12^ chains, 6 to the head of the bayou, 1ST. 22 degrees W. 16 chains, N. 38 degrees W. 15i chains, N. 51 degrees W. 13.77 chains to the corner of sections 28, 29, 32 and 33.

Prior to 1845 the title to the territory described became vested in many persons, each having an undivided interest therein. Such judicial proceedings were duly had that in 1846 a judgment in partition was duly rendered, awarding to each of such parties in severalty his just proportion of the land, the whole tract having been previously surveyed and platted so as to enable the court to make such award. The disputed land is located in block 195 and a platted street between such block and block 194. Block 195 is the southwesterly part of the island. Block 194 is on the westerly side of the island. The two blocks are bounded on the east by a platted street. They are bounded or limited on the west by the meander line of the Milwaukee river. Block 195 is bounded on the south by the bayou. The plaintiff, by mesne conveyances, was the owner in fee of the two blocks mentioned, at the time of the commencement of this action. On the trial it established the right to recover if Jones Island, so-called, was part of the public domain of the United States



The above sketch was taken from the map made in 1840 at the time of the partition proceedings.―Rep.

Illinois Steel Co. v. Budzisz, 115 Wis. 6a

which it had a right to transfer to private ownership and the patent title had not been divested by adverse possession. Prior to 1872 several persons, strangers to tho patent title, occupied parts of the island. The adverse holdings were apart from each other. They were, as stated by some of the witnesses, all over the island. One of the settlers was
Gottlieb Truher. He sold his place to Jacob Muza in 1872 for $100, not making any written conveyance. Muza occupied such place, with slight interruptions, continuously from the time he purchased the same till the commencement of this action. Some time prior to 1890, and not earlier than 1885, Muza designated a place on the island for one Peer to locate. The latter made a fill ajt the place designated, of sufficient size for tho foundation of a house, and constructed one thereon. Thereafter he enlarged the filled space and inclosed the same on three sides with a fence, leaving an opening at the back part of his lot, and thereafter continued to extend the fill till he occupied the entire premises described in the complaint. Ho occupied the same continuously from the time the house was built till 1890, when he sold his right to the premises to the defendant, who immediately took possession thereof and occupied the same till the commencement of this action.

There was evidence to the effect that
Truher, in 1872, claiming possession of and dominion over the entire island, sold all his rights to Muza, and that thereafter tho latter exercised dominion over the territory continuously till this action was commenced, except as ho surrendered portions thereof from time to time to persons desiring to locate homes thereon; that in 1887 there were upwards of 200 settlers on tho island; that tho number largely increased thereafter before the commencement of this action. The acts of possession which witnesses testified that Muza exercised were as follows: As soon as ho purchased of Truher he explored the island, traveling part of the time on foot and part of the Illinois Steel Co. v. Budzisz, 115 Wis. 68.

time in a boat. Immediately thereafter he commenced to improve the island. He continued to improve it till this action was commenced. The improvements were made chiefly by permitting persons to settle on the island, not exacting any compensation therefor except that they should aid in making the territory suitable for habitations. All the settlers did more or less work in improving the island under Muza's direction. The brush on the island was all cleared off and put into the low places. Filling was done by using ashes and all material that could be obtained. Some trees were planted. Some structures were made to prevent inroads from the waters of the lake. During all the time it was generally understood that Muza controlled the island. Persons who desired to settle thereon looked to him for directions in improving the territory. Undesirable characters 'were prohibited by him from'coming upon the island. Some persons who came to fish and hunt were compelled by him to go away.
Truher, being called as a witness, testified that he never claimed any interest in any part. of the island except that occupied by his house, and that he did not sell or pretend to sell any other interest to Muza.

There was evidence tending to show that during some portion of 1875 Muza was absent from the island and at Oshkosh; that his house was, during such alienee, occupied by another party, though his household furniture remained therein. There was some dispute as to whether he sold the house to such occupant and thereafter purchased it back. He explained that his absence Avas only temporary, that it was without any intention to change his home or abandon the island, and that while he was away he kept an agent at the island to look after his interests. The evidence was undisputed that Muza made no claim whatever that any person who lived on the island at the time he went there was a trespasser'upon his rights or that he had any control over those portions of the island occupied by such persons; that many Illinois Steel Co. v. Budzisz, 115 Wis. 68.

of the settlers who located on lie island subsequent to 1872 did not consult or recognize him in any way as proprietor of the territory; that he made no claim that their conduct was an invasion of his rights or collected or attempted to collect any rent from any of the settlers, or demanded or received any compensation from any of them for the privilege to locate on the island, other than in the making of improvements, as before indicated, for the mutual interests of the settlers; that in 1876 blocks 194 and 195 were surveyed and the exact location of all settlements thereon determined at the instance of the owner of the patent title; that considerable time was occupied in making the survey; that stakes were placed by or under the direction of the surveyor, indicating the boundaries of the blocks, and that all of the houses were numbered; that thereafter an agent was sent to the island to interview the occupants of such houses and to make leases with them; that a largo number of such leases were made; that all of such transactions were open and notorious; that none of the settlers made any claim to a right of possession under Muza; that he made no claim that the attitude of the owner of the patent title was an invasion of his rights, or any objection to the acts of such owner; that in 1887 the territory was again canvassed for leases by an agent of the owner of the patent title; that a large number of leases were thereby obtained; that such canvass was open and notorious, the agent going to substantially all the settlers; that no one, during such time, disputed the claim represented by such agent; that thereafter the lessees generally refused to recognize the leases and pay rent.

At the close of the evidence plaintiff's counsel moved the court for a verdict in its favor, which motion was denied. The jury rendered the following verdict: ....

"(1) At the time referred to in the complaint, was and is the paper title to the premises described in the pleadings, in the plaintiff? A. (By the court, by consent of counsel) Yes.

Illinois Steel Co. v. Budzisz, 115 Wis. 6&

"(2) Was the property in question at the time the patent therefor was issued by the United States, naturally a part of the bed of Lake Michigan, or some arm or bayou thereof ? A. Yes.

"(3) Was the property in question at the time the patent therefor was issued by the United States naturally a part of the bed of some meandered lake or pond ? A. Yes.

"(4) Was the property in question at the time the patent therefor was issued by the United States, naturally a part of the bed of a river? A. No.

"If you answer either one of questions 2, 3 and 4 'Yes/ the remaining two of such questions need not be answered.

"(5) Have the defendants and their grantors and predecessors in title combined, usually cultivated or improved tho premises in question continuously for a period of twenty years or more immediately preceding the commencement of tins action? A. Yes.'

"(6) Had the defendant, Budzisz, and his privies, Treher (or Reher) and Muza, occupied the premises in question continuously for twenty years prior to the beginning of this action, on the 1st day of July, 1897, by such actual, open, notorious, exclusive and continuous possession as such premises were adapted to and as was reasonably sufficient to attract the attention of the true owner and put him on an inquiry as to the nature and extent of tho invasion of his rights ? A. Yes.

"(7) At the time of the commencement of this action were the defendants in possession of the property in controversy ? A. (By the court) Yes.

"(8) Did the defendants unlawfully withhold from the plaintiff the possession of the propertv in controversy ? A. No."

Plaintiff's counsel moved the court to set aside the findings of the jury, except the first, as contrary to the undisputed evidence, and for judgment in its favor. Later such counsel moved the court to set aside the verdict and grant a newtrial. Thereafter judgment was entered on the verdict in favor of defendants.

For the appellant there were briefs by Van Dyke & Van Dyke & Carter, and oral argument by W. E. Carter.



 The first four files are taken from Jack's genealogy research folder of filename, Truher_Gottlieb Kaszubs Jones Island, Milwaukee. There are the files marked most pointedly in RED indicating they were critical in understanding the circumstance. This is a wealth of other information in the main folder which I may add later to this TBF collection.
 
• Wednesday, September 29, 2010
• August-Nellie
• Florentine Truher-Lietzau family origins, out of Europe
•  Truher-Lietzau-Schafferius-Kashubians.rtfd

Schafferius Family Update


   Travel in Steerage, 19th Century

Up to the second half of the nineteenth century, the transport of emigrants was only a subsidiary branch of cargo transport, and emigrants consequently travelled in cargo ships temporarily adapted for passengers.

A deck was built between the upper deck and the hold--in German this was known as Zwischendeck. Steerage was primitive. The berths were removed again at the end of the voyage since the space was needed on the return journey for cargo. They were knocked together out of mere planks, narrow and mostly too short.

Mattresses and bedding were provided by the passengers. There were few latrines and ventilation was poor. All the passengers were crowded into this poorly-lit deck both day and night. Only if the weather was good was it possible for them to emerge onto the upper deck.

Medical care was not available. Passengers provided their own food and crockery. (They were provided with water.) For cooking there was a fireplace or two, insufficient--this problem often led to quarrels between passengers and many went for days without a hot meal.

By about the end of the 1870s, the steamship had replaced the sailing ship which improved conditions almost at once. The passage (to the USA) was reduced to seventeen days--compared to the sailing vessel's ninety days. Fast steamers in the 1890s made the crossing in nine days. These were fitted especially for passengers and were better ventilated, had doctors, had privacy for women, and food was more plentiful.

as found in
http://www.myfamily.com

for the Schafferius Family Update.

Jack found this Australian family interesting, because of similarity in Schafferius

with a nearly identical spelling in the Truher family line. Also in my previous searches,
I found many of the same place of origin names, from whence I learned from the
Los Altos Lietzau descendent. The towns southeast of, and near Danzig which commonly appear in the stories of Truher-Lietzau and Schafferius-Lietza are:

Berent or Koscierzyna, and perhaps Pinczyn. Notice also in the related Colston & Wenck Generalogy that Karl Ferdinand Lietzau is said to hail from Berent (Koscierzyna) Germany, also identified as Kashubian/Pomeranian in Poland.

A Kashubian connection is another suggestive linkage as we learned in the story of Gottlieb Truher, which Jack told in the link:


imageimageimage

http://colston-wenck.com/getperson.php?personID=I473&tree=colstonwenck



KOSCIERZYNA IS 600 YEARS OLD: 1398 – 1998

  
German troops marched into town on 2 September 1939, and Hitler’s first victims included national activists, men of education and the clergy. The town did not passively surrender to the exterminators but fought back, and carried on fighting until the day of liberation. The first underground movement was a branch of the Polish Home Army organized by Jan Landowski. Another rebel force was the Gryf Pomorski (Pomeranian Griffin) Secret Military Organization. Numerous plaques and monuments in the town commemorate the heroes of those days.
Koscierzyna’s oldest monument is the well-preserved nineteenth century town centre with a unique market square. The four corners of the square are the departure points of two streets which each run at square angles to the square itself. The atmosphere of the small nineteenth century town is still present here. The fourteenth century plan of the town’s centre is still evident, although, due to the ravages of numerous fires, the oldest buildings date to the eighteenth century. A two-storied town hall built in 1843, with its distinctive clock on top, is the oldest building in the market square. Most of the residential buildings on the market square and the adjacent streets were built at the turn of the nineteenth century. The eighteenth century structures are represented by two interesting buildings: a house on Koscielna Street that belonged to the well-known town potters, the Budzynski family, and a residential building on Dluga Street. The seat of the local court is a fine example of old Neo-Gothic architecture.
Monuments of sacral art include the Neo-Baroque Holy Trinity parish church, built in 1914 – 1917, which replaced an older, smaller brick church. Its interior has retained its baroque and rococo character thanks to altars, a baptismal font and a pulpit salvaged from other churches which had been destroyed in fires. The church is the sanctuary of the Virgin Mary of Koscierzyna. Since the end of the seventeenth century, annual pilgrimages to the Wejherowo Calvary have begun from here. In the chapel next to the Neo-Gothic Angelic Virgin Mary convent school there is a pietà, a fifteenth century masterpiece of Pomeranian mason-work. The slender spire of the once Evangelical church and today a Catholic convent sanctuary towers over the area. The structure’s interior design, especially an admirable palm vault, altars and sculptures, are all the work of Koscierzyna’s famous sculptor Franciszek Greinke. The nineteenth century sacral structures include the Neo-Romanesque St. Barbara cemetery chapel from the 1880s, which replaced the eighteenth century church.
Koscierzyna’s necropolis is the final resting place for the ashes of the Kashubian region’s most worthy sons. Tomasz Rogala was a shoemaker by profession, but he was also a member of many patriotic societies and an organizer of workers’ meetings and the school strike of 1906. Rogala, referred to as the Kashubian King, made himself famous for his patriotic speech defending the Kashubian region at the Versailles peace conference. Lubomir Szopinski was a talented and devoted Koscierzyna-born composer and conductor and the founder of the Kashubian choir which subsequently grew into the Song and Dance Band of Kashubia. Another man of great local renown was Leon Heyke, a priest and folklorist, as well as a talented author of dramatized stage anecdotes often performed in Kashubia. His greatest achievement as a poet, however, is
Piesnie Polnocy (Songs from the North) in the volume entitled Kszëbszcie spiewë. Primary School No. 2 bears his name in commemoration of his merits.
The group of regional celebrities also includes Aleksander Majkowski - a  doctor, a poet, a regional activist and the founder of the Young Kashubia movement. He fought not only against the Germanization of Kashubia but also against provincial parochialism. He worked for previously existing organizations and set up new ones, such as the People’s Reading-Rooms Society or the Kashubian House. He initiated the publishing of the
Gryf (The Griffin) magazine which addressed Kashubian matters. He struggled to awaken Kashubian awareness among the local people. He wrote: “My Kashubian brothers, be yourselves!”. A commemorative bust of Majkowski has been placed at the foot of the old castle hill.
Kashubia was also a birthplace of Jozef Wybicki, the  author of the Polish national anthem. There is a monument in his honour in one of Koscierzyna’s main streets. Today, the National Anthem Museum is located in Bedomin (east of Koscierzyna) in the old manor-house where Wybicki was born on 29 September 1747. This replaced the Wybicki Commemorative Chamber in 1978 thanks to the efforts of the Kashubian and Pomeranian Association.
===========================================
source for text above has been lost
but check this out
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ko%C5%9Bcierzyna
leads to German language sources:

http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=titledetails&titleno=300730&disp=Kirchenbuch%20%20&columns=*,0,0
============================================

History of the land of the Kashubs
http://en.kaszubia.com/kashubians/history/kashubs_history
Tags: Kashubians
History of Cassubia is lengthy and interesting. The Kashubs have lived in Pomerania for over a thousand years, but their written history begins as late as 1238 AD. Pope Gregor IX called then the Stettinian prince Bogusław “the prince of Cassubia”. It is the oldest document known that mentions Cassubia, by which is understood the Western Pomeranian principality that existed from the 12th to 16th century and reclined to German political influences and military power.
In Eastern Pomerania since the end of the 12th century also existed an independent principality ruled by Subisław and his progeny. The most famous of them was Świętopełk who ruled the Gedanian Pomerania in years 1219-1266. His son Mściwój II ruled the land since 1271, unfortunately he had no successor. In 1282, he bequeathed his land to the Posnanian prince Przemysław II. When he died in 1294, Cassubia entered into a union with Poland and Przemysław was crowned a king of the newly augmented kingdom. At the beginning of 1296, he was assassinated though and his land invaded by the neighbors. Following that, in Cassubia began a long period of the Teutonic Knights’, intertwined with the Polish rule that lasted (with breaks) until the partitions of Poland (1772-1796). Then, for over 120 years, Kashubian land remained under the rule of Prussia. In 1920, it was taken over by Poland to which, less the Second World War years, it still belongs.
The Kashubs are a Slavonic nation most closely related to the Poles. Their language, Kashubian, belongs to the group of Slavonic languages and consequently resembles Polish, Russian and Czech. Because of the lengthy German neighborhood, Kashubian has incorporated many words derived from the Germanic languages, mainly German, but Kashubian grammar closely resembles that of Polish. The Kashubs pronounce some words in a manner similar to Poles, but use more vowels. Kashubian contains multiple dialects and a different variation of the language is spoken by the sea, in the area around Wejherowo, Kartuzy, or in the Tucholian Forests that form the southern border of Cassubia.
For many years Kashubs displayed a frail sense of their national identity, culture and language. Inadequate education, poverty, illiteracy, and German oppression afforded the latter decisive dominance in the area. The Kashubs were treated as the second-class citizens; a nation of a lower rank. At times they have endorsed similar attitudes themselves frequently showing no desire to change their dim fate. They could not imagine the world beyond their limited confines, as their rational horizons were rather narrow.
The first to recognize the distinctiveness of the Kashubian folk from their neighbors was Florian Ceynowa. He is known as the “Awakener of the Kashubs”. He has learned the Kashubian language, tried to collect its vocabulary and define its spelling. Active in the second half of the 19th century, he wrote and kept publishing short Kashubian stories along with scientific works. Unfortunately, he failed to “wake up” the Kashubs, became tired of the job and for the rest of his life worked as a physician. He died in 1881.
But soon the cultural level of Cassubia rose and the first Kashubian books appeared. The most famous of them was “O panu Czorlińsczim co do Pucka po sece jachôł” (About Mr. Czorlińsczi who went to Puck to buy the fishing nets) by Hieronim Derdowski. Its author also was a Kashubian activist who lived toward the end of the 19th century later immigrating to America where he kept publishing a popular magazine for American Poles called “Wiarus” (The Veteran). He died in 1902, aged 50.
Near the end of the century a Kashubian activist, Aleksander Majkowski, soon realized that he would not accomplish much working alone. Therefore he formed an organization dedicated to Kashubian matters which he called Towarzystwo Młodokaszubów (Society of Young Kashubs). It was active between 1912 and the start of the First World War. Its successes were rather few and far between but it has initiated collaboration of Kashubian activists. Majkowski himself continued to be active after the war later turning to literary works. Amongst others he wrote the greatest Kashubian novel “Żëcé i przigodë Remusa” (Life and Adventures of Remus) and a draft of the history of the Kashubs. He died in 1938.
Towards the end of his life Majkowski became a dedicated supporter of the young Kashubian activists who in 1929 formed Zrzeszenie Regionalne Kaszubów (Kashubian Regional Union). It incorporated Aleksander Labuda, Jan Trepczyk, Stefan Bieszk, Jan Rompski, Feliks Marszałkowski, and Rev. Franciszek Grucza. They published the “Zrzesz Kaszëbskô” (Kashubian Union) magazine and tried to enliven and alleviate the Kashubian culture and activity. Although they met with obstacles on the part of the Polish pre-war authorities and other regional circles and institutions, they managed to do a lot for the promotion of the Kashubian language and literature. Very well known are Labuda’s short stories (editorials ), Trepczyk’s songs, as well as the Kashubian translation of “The New Testament” authored by Rev. Grucza.
During the war the Kashubs lived under the German terror. Many were treated as Germans and forcibly enlisted into the Hitlerian army as cannon fodders. Thousands of inhabitants of this land were killed in public executions, in combat or Nazi concentration camps. Amongst them were Kashubian activists, e.g. Rev. Leon Heyke, bishop Konstantyn Dominik, the Mayor of Wejherowo Teodor Bolduan, or teacher Stefan Lewiński. In Cassubia throughout the war an underground organization „Gryf Pomorski” (Pomeranian Griffon) performed its anti-German actions.
After the liberation a verification of the Kashubs fighting in the Third Reich army was ordered alongside the rehabilitation of people who more or less voluntarily declared themselves as Germans during the war in this part of Poland. A feeling of mistrust to Kashubs came prevalent within the Polish authorities and lasted for many years.
At the end of 1956, a group of Kashubian intellectuals managed to set up a local organization called Zrzeszenie Kaszubskie (Kashubian Association) that later renamed itself to Zrzeszenie Kaszubsko-Pomorskie (Kashubian-Pomeranian Association). From the word go it has tried to take care of the Kashubian language and culture, document the history of the area, collect and protect the Kashubian folklore, inspire and create Kashubian literature and in many ways „wake” the Kashubs. The Association counts a few thousand members, conducts many actions and leads several institutions, while publishing numerous books devoted to Kashubian matters. Recently it launched the issuance of a three-volume publication entitled “The History of the Kashubs” whose first volume has already been released and written by Prof. Gerard Labuda, the best known of all living Kashubs in the world.
==========================

http://en.kaszubia.com/kashubians/history/maps

Maps – Kashubia Throughout History
Tags: Kashubia , Kashubians , Pomerania , Pomeranians
Kashubia Throughout History
The presented maps are based on research of Prof. Dr Józef  Borzyszkowski as published in his book “Historia Kaszubów” [en. History of Kashubians], Gdańsk 1999.They also reflect studies conducted by Dr Jan Modrawski as published in “Geografia współczesnych Kaszub” [en. Geography of Contemporary Kashubia], Gdańsk 1999.


image
Pomeranians (Kashubians) between 800-950, A.D.

image
Pomeranians (Kashubians) around 925, A.D.

image
Pomeranians (Kashubians) around 1180

image
Pomeranians (Kashubians) around 1220

image
Kashubians around 1370

image
Kashubians around 1640

image
Kashubians around 1660

image
Kashubians in 19th century

image
Kashubians 19th/20th century

image
Kashubians between 1918-1939

image
Kashubians in 20th century










• But where did they come from? Start at Berent (Gr) = Koscierzyna (Polish)

 http://www.peacework.us./gene2/Truher-Lietzau-Koscierzyna/

I have found a way that I think is just as good, and it can be done at your local LDS genealogical center.  Recall I have told you about a likely place of origin for Truher and Lietzau surnames: in German Berent, otherwise known as Koscierzyna in Poland, about 50 kM southeast of Danzig.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ko%C5%9Bcierzyna

Recall some confirmation in our investigation with the Kashubians of Milwaukee recent.

The German Church records are available with the LDS libraries everywhere on microfilm from Koscierzyna.

Follow the wikipedia link above  to find these records.  The first is Catholic, not likely Gottlieb's people. 

Title
Kirchenbuch, 1642-1906
Authors
Katholische Kirche Berent (KrSt. Berent) (Main Author)
Notes
Mikrofilme aufgenommen von Manuskripten in Berlin-Dahlem, im Katholischen Kirchenbuchamt München und im Geheimen Staatsarchiv Berlin-Dahlem.

Parish register of baptisms, marriages and deaths for Berent (AG. Berent), Westpreußen, Preußen, Germany, now Kóscierzyna (Kościer zyna), Gdańsk, Poland.

Subjects
Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Berent - Church records
Poland, Gdańsk, Kościerzyna (Kościerzyna) - Church records
Format
Manuscript (On Film)
Language
German
Publication
Salt Lake City, Utah : Gefilmt durch The Genealogical Society of Utah, 1950, 1965, 1974
Berlin-Dahlem : Geheimes Staatsarchiv
Physical
auf 13 Mikrofilmrollen ; 35 mm.

the German link for Berent: then is:

Topic Details
Topic
Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Berent - Church records

Title search results

Kirchenbuch, 1642-1906  Katholische Kirche Berent (KrSt. Berent)
Kirchenbuch, 1781-1944  Evangelische Kirche Berent (KrSt. Berent)
2 matching titles.
There must be people who would chase that down.  I'm in no condition to get involved, certainly not in the near term.
recall I did some research on Koscierzyna recently,

 
http://www.peacework.us./gene2/Truher-Lietzau-Koscierzyna/
also now at
 
http://gene.truher.net/truher/Koscierzyna-Truher-Lietzau/

and something on the Kashubians, in our email exchanges about Jakob, Gottlieb
at their intersecting the Kashubians on Jones Island at the Terminus of rivers in Milwaukee.

We have been calling them Kaszubians, probably the Americanization.
• Monday, September 6, 2010
• James Burke, father of Helen, was a story teller
 
Grampa James Burke, his daughter HBT said
would entertain the neighborhood children
with a poem-sing, rooted in Sinn Fein rebellion
against the English, so I was told. -- John Burke Truher


There was an old man
As blind as he could be
He said he saw a bold Raynee
A climbing up a tree-hee-hee
With a HELL-O
All in the merry al strength
Of the ran tan tan
And the tip-a-tip-a-tan
And AWAY with the royal dogs
and the roodle-roodle-roodle
of the bugle horn
And a rink-tum-foodle
And a rink-tum-day
And through the woods we'll run brave boys
And through the woods we'll run.


HBT wrote about a poem that her father would recite for his children, and the neighbor children gathered about their Richland Center home porch. Her father was a story teller she said. She and her sister, Edna Burke Nasby, were able to put together the following words, without knowing much about it's meaning, except that it was seditious in Ireland. Mother told me that "the Royal Dogs" were the English who had dominated Ireland for so long. She said that her father was a sympathizer with Sinn Fein, the Irish Nationalists. By searching for other books on "through the woods we'll run", I find that the "bold Raynee" was a fox. The metaphor is about a fox hunt, but it's meaning was support of Irish Nationalism, as mother led me to believe.

http://openlibrary.org/b/OL19947959M/most_pleasing_and_delightful_History_of_Reynard_the_Fox_and_Reynardine_his_Son

The most pleasing and delightful History of Reynard the Fox, and Reynardine his Son
in two parts : With Morals to each chapter, explaining what appears doubtful or allegorical.
Published in 1814, Printed by Simms & McIntyre (Belfast (69, Donegall Street))
The most pleasing and delightful History of Reynard the Fox, and Reyn ...

Change Cover
Contributions:
Simms andMcIntyre (Belfast),
Other titles:
Reynard the Fox. English.
Work:
Reynard the Fox.
Language:
English
Edition:
A new edition.
Pagination:143p. ;


and Jack found a googleBook --
http://www.archive.org/stream/badmintonlibrar12watsgoog/badmintonlibrar12watsgoog_djvu.txt - then searching on "And through the woods we'll run"

The Poetry of Sport
SELECTED AND EDITED BY
HEDLEY PEEK
WITH A CHAPTER ON CLASSICAL ALLUSIONS TO SPORT
BY ANDREW LANG, AND A SPECIAL PREFACE TO
THE BADMINTON LIBRARY BY A. E. T.WATSON
LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.
LONDON AND BOMBAY
1896


Jack found some derivation, a few years ago.
The Fox Chase

The sun has just peep'd his head o'er the hills,
While the ploughboy he whistles cross the fields,
And the birds they are singing so sweet on each spray
Says the huntsman to his dogs, * tally ho I hark away I '

CHORUS

Tally ho I hark away, tally ho ! hark away.
Tally ho, tally ho, tally ho, hark away.

Come, come, my brave sportsmen, and make no delay.
Quick, saddle your horses, and let's brush away,
For the fox is in view, and is kindled with scorn,
Come along, my brave sportsmen, and join the shrill horn.

Tally ho, &c.

He led us £. chase, more than fifty long miles,
Over hedges, over ditches, over gates, and over stiles.
Little David came up with his musical horn.
We shall soon overtake him, for his brush drags along.

Tally ho, &c.

We followed him in chase, six hours full cry.
Tally ho, hark away, for now he must die.
Now we'll cut off his brush, with a hallooing noise.
And drink good success to fox-hunting boys.

Tally ho, &c.

CramptoH Ballads^

Digitized by LjOOQ iC

HUA'TING
Three Jovial Huntsmen
There were three jovial huntsmen,
A hunting they would go,
To see whether they'd find sly Reynard,
Among the woods and groves.

15S
CHORUS
With a hoop, hoop, hoop, and a hallow,
All in this merry train,
To my ran tan too, to my chevy, chevy chase,
Away to the royal bar.
With my ugle, ugle, ugle, and the blast of the bugle horn.
To my ri fal de ra, to my diddle don,
And it's through the woods we'll run, brave boys.

====================

156 THE POETRY OF SPORT
The first was an old woman,
A combing down her locks,
She said she saw bold Reynard

Among the geese and ducks. Chorus.

The next was a miller,

A grinding in his mill,
He said he saw bold Reynard,
Approaching yonder hill.
The next it was a blind man,

As blind as blind could be,
He said he heard bold Reynard

Running up yonder tree.
The next it was a Parson,
He was dressed in black.
He said he saw bold Reynard
Tied to the huntsman's back.

With a hoop, hoop, hoop, and a hallow,

All in this merry train.
To my ran tan too, to my chevy chase
Away to the Royal Bar,
With my ugle, ugle, and the blast of the bugle horn,

To my ri fal de ra, to my diddle, diddle don,
And it's through the woods we'll run, brave boys.

liallad.

Southerly Wind and a Cloudy Sky
Southerly wind and a cloudy sky,
Proclaims a hunting morning,
Before the sun rise, we nimbly fly,
Dull sleep and a downy bed scorning.

To horse my boys, to horse away,
The chase admits of no delay.
On horseback we've got, together we'll trot.
On horseback we've got, together we'll trot.
Leave off your chat, see if the cover appear,
The hound that strikes first, cheer him without fear.
Drag on him, ah wind him, my steady good hound,
Drag on him, ah wind him, the cover resounds.

How completely the cover and furze they draw.
Who talks of Bany or Meynell,

Young Lasher he flourishes now thro' the shaw,

And Saucebix roars out in his kennel.
Away we fly as quick as thought,
The new sown ground soon makes them fault,

Digitized by LjOOQ IC

• Saturday, September 4, 2010
• Gottlieb & Karoline Truher immigrants arrive in New York, July 8, 1870
• 1-Gottlieb & Karoline Truher immigrants arrive in New York, July 8, 1870

Bogenschneider family web site tells story of Gottlieb's family journey on the Western Metropolis

http://gene.truher.net/truher/WesternMetropolis-JBT/

======================================

Subject:
Gottlieb & Karoline Truher arrive New York July 8, 1870
Date:
Sat, 04 Sep 2010 08:36:10 -0700
From:
Jack Truher

We have long known that the Truher family arrived in New York from Germany on July 8, 1870, and place.

We have known about the good ship, Western Metropolis, on which they traveled and some detail of the events, but the graphics was poor. I've got some better imagery,
here than I recall seeing in our earlier research.

image

one of the Western Metropolis itself, and an artistic view of the San Salvadore( above)

I found a picture of a sister ship the San Salvadore, at least in appearance (above) and Technology.

Tonight, I'll send you
a web page, with the imagery and a couple of the other documents, with highlighted text that fixes the dates of things.

One of those other documents is also available on the web, as by the
Bogenschneider Family , which happened to include their arrival on the same ship and date, with more detail. (Look for the highlighted text) We've had this for a long time, but the images make a difference to me tonight. .

http://gene.truher.net/truher/WesternMetropolis-JBT/ is same link as above

The image below is the W.M. as a Paddle Wheel, before it's
Sails were added for the Atlantic
passenger trade, at which time it looked more like the San Salvadore at top of this message:


image
image


• 3-Gottlieb & Karoline - another formulation --

Here's is email text connecting Bogenschneider's we text as from an email Jack to a few on or about 2010m0903.

We know from other document in this folder that August Truher arrived in New York July 8, 1870.

Jack starts out tonight with picture Ron and I have had for years. Lots more on the web now. So we wind up with some outstanding representations of a sister ship (meaning same technology & general appearance),

San Salvador, to August Truher's Western Metropolis

2010m0903

Start with

image Then work on that image

The sail-and-steam Western Metropolis used an engine of the "walking beam" type. Note the xxxxmast(?) rising through the deckhead of her wheelhouse.

http://www.hylandgranby.com/marine_antiques_paintings_details.asp?itemID=PA0693 ==
image

San Salvador

image

San Salvador


================================================
http://images.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/results?itype=Prints&q=Buffalo&fz=0

image
WESTERN METROPOLIS
imageimage  1895 ... WESTERN METROPOLIS Built 1856, at Buffalo, N. Y. HULL, of wood, by Bidwell, Banta & Co.; 340 feet over all; 40 feet beam, and 18 feet depth of hold. Tonnage 1,860 ONE BEAM ENGINE, by Merrick & Towne, Philadelphia, PA., diameter of cylinder 76 1/4 inches, by 12 feet stroke TWO BOILERS...

http://images.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/811/data?n=22

image

see full image,
Western Metropolis-EXT00419f,

http://images.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/811/image/2713?n=22


image
• 4-...August Truher's recitation of the political environment which triggered their emigration

Bogenschneider's web page text is here as found in link leading the story. The circumstance and travels of August Bogenschneider and August Truher, are so closely linked that this could also be August Truher's recitation of the political environment which triggered their emigration aboard the same ship, Western Metropolis and on the same date, leaving from the same port, etc. Indeed we find in this text: "
August and his family left Prussia and arrived in America on July 8, 1870, one week before the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War on July 15." note by Jack Truher 2010-10-24.

---------------------------------------------

Bogenschneider Family Genealogy and Information

http://www.bogenschneider.org/august_bogenschneider_info.htm

The Bogenschneider Family Worldwide web site is dedicated to the Bogenschneider surname and to its associated histories, lineages, and shared family information.

Pomeranian Flag

The Life and Times of August Bogenschneider (1837-1919)
According to family history, August left Pommern in 1870 because of the imminent Franco-Prussian War and because of other 19th century developments in Pomerania.

Pomerania in the 19th Century: During the Thirty Years' War (1648), more of the Pomeranian land fell into the hands of the upper class, and their control was solidified. The tenants were given housing, some garden space, and payment in kind. There were restrictions on emigration, and the tenants were serfs. They were required to work on the estates three to four days a week. The political rights of the landowners, later called Junkers, allowed exploitation of the peasants.

Agrarian reforms of the 1808-16 changed life on the landed estates. Peasants could now marry without the permission of the landowner. Peasants could move to another Junker estate or work in town as day workers. However, life was no better than before. The estate owner no longer had to care for his tenants and could evict them. If the farm worker moved to town, the pay for his labor was small. The peasant could own land but only for as long as he lived. Then it would revert to the state. There were few landowners who treated their tenants with respect, but there was mostly a tendency for the German upper class to be authoritarian and regard the peasants as their personal property.

In 1817 a consolidation of the Lutheran churches to a State church began. By 1837 Friedrich Wilhelm III had combined the Lutheran and Calvinist churches. Many of the Old Lutherans of Pomerania objected and emigrated to America and other countries in the years of 1837, 1839, and 1843. (From "The History of Pomerania," edited by Carol Gohsman Bowen (
http://pages.prodigy.net/jhbowen/pommhist.htm )

There were many disasters in the 19th century in Pommerania. The great estates of Pomerania always produced an abundance of grain, especially rye. In the 1830s, England exacted a high tariff on this grain; the price of grain fell, and this hurt the estates and therefore the workers on the estates. There was a potato blight in the 1840s. The sandy soil of Pomerania was good for growing potatoes, and they were the main staple of the Pomeranian table. Many poor people went hungry. There were disastrous weather conditions in the years from 1853 until 1856. There was also rapid industrialization from 1850 until 1857 and many workers left the farms and the price of land fell.

Many Pomeranians emigrated to the United States in the second half of the 19th century. This peaked around 1880. Most of these Pomeranians were Lutherans who lived in the Midwest. The largest percentage went to Wisconsin. (This history was compiled from the writings of LeRoy Boehlke, President of Pommerscher Verein Freistadt, from the writings of Myron Gruenwald, who has written several books on Pommerania.)

August Bogenschneider and His Family. August served in the Prussian army, and related stories to his family of all the dead bodies he saw while driving an ammunition cart and horse through a battlefield. He was horrified by the death and destruction. His war experience was possibly in the 1863 Prussian War against Denmark, which won Prussia control of the states of Schleswig and Holstein, but he most likely served in the 1866 War with Austria ("Austro-Prussian War" or "The 7 Weeks War"). The Austro-Prussian War was between Prussia, allied with Italy, against Austria and her allies Bavaria, Württemberg, Saxony, Hanover, Baden, and several smaller German states. It was a war deliberately provoked by Otto von Bismarck, the Chancellor, over the objection of King William, in order to expel Austria from the German Confederation as a step toward the unification of Germany under Prussian dominance. The primary and final battle of this war was the Battle of Sadowa, named after the nearby village of Sadowa in the Czech Republic. After the early part of the campaign, the Austrian army had retired behind the River Elbe. The Prussian 1st and and Elbe Armies attacked the Austrians at the bridge of Sadowa early in the morning. They were able to drive the Austrians back for a short distance but the Austrian artillery fire prevented any further progress. The arrival of the Prussian 2nd Army in the late morning threatened the Austrian right flank. To meet this threat, the Austrians pulled their right wing back so that it faced north, but a bold advance by the Prussians, taking advantage of the cover provided by high corn and the smoke of the Austrian artillery fire, led to their infantry being able to get close to the Austrian lines and then charge home, breaking the line and capturing over 50 guns. The Austrians began to pull back and finally retreated from the field, leaving 40,000 dead and wounded. Prussian losses were about 10,000. This may well have been the battle scene that so horrified August.

August and his family left Prussia and arrived in America on July 8, 1870, one week before the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War on July 15. It is unclear whether August had fulfilled his military obligations or left in order to avoid serving in the Franco-Prussian War. To legally emigrate from Prussia in the 1870s, one would have had to secure a release from citizenship and a release from military service. If August emigrated to avoid additional military service, he would have had to ignore these legal requirements. This was not that uncommon. Avoidance of the draft and serving in the Prussian Army during the Franco-Prussian War was a reason that many people left Pomerania. In fact, many historians rank the avoidance of the draft more significant than those who left Pommern for religious reasons.

Between 1807 and 1813 Prussia had developed a conscript system that became the model for the nations of Europe. The Prussians bypassed Napoleon's imposition of limitations on the size of their army by calling up the permitted number of men (42,000), training them rigorously for a few months, and then releasing the majority and calling up a new complement. They were thus able to build up a powerful reserve of trained men without openly defying Napoleon. After the Napoleonic era Prussia continued to employ this system, so that by the time of the Franco-Prussian War (1870-71) it had a mass army of conscripts reinforced with large reserve units, in contrast to France's smaller standing professional army. When Bismarck was installed as Chancellor in 1861, his first act was to over rule a parliament that wanted to reduce military service obligations from three to two years and he pushed through numerous army reforms. Bismarck said, "The great questions of the day will not be decided by speeches and resolutions of majorities, but by blood and iron." To maintain its large army, conscription was enforced and 63,000 men were conscripted each to serve 3 years on active duty and 4 more years in active reserve.

It was also a time of considerable political, social and economic unrest and a time of inevitable wars. The desire to avoid further serving in the army and again experiencing the horrors of death he had witnessed, and a desire to seek a better economic opportunity and life for his family in America, led August Bogenschneider in 1870 to make his decision to emigrate with his family to America. It was not an easy decision for him, because there was always the psychological stigma of being a deserter. Conservatism and loyalty were strong Pomeranian/Prussian characteristics. But August thought of his pregnant young wife, Wilhelmina, his four year-old son, Karl, and his six-month-old baby Hattie, and concluded that their life and future would be much better in America.

It is believed that August was from the town of Luckow, Kreis (County) Randow, Regierungsbezirk (district) of Stettin, Province of Pommern, Country of Prussia. Today the town is known as
Luckow-Petershagen , Kreis Uckermark, Brandenberg, Germany. August and his family made their way to Swinemünde, a Pomeranian port on the Baltic Sea. The family may have gone up the River Oder and then across the Great Haff, but most probably went by train from Luckow to Stettin and then Swinemünde. Because of an epidemic of typhoid fever on the Hamburg emigrant ship "Leibniz" during the winter crossing of 1867-1868 that caused the deaths of 108 out of 544 passengers, August, his family, and all the other emigrants were required to undergo a medical examination before embarking.

The August Bogenschneider family emigrated on the steamship Western Metropolis, Henry S. Quick, Master, and chartered to the Ruger Brothers' North American Lloyd Line. On May 18, 1870, Quick sailed from New York for Havre-Bremen-Copenhagen-Swinemünde-Kiel-Christiansand. As with many of the immigrant ships, the ship probably carried a cargo from the U.S. to Europe. The ship had a poor mechanical history and ownership had often changed hands. It had been used in the Civil War to ferry both cargo, war supplies and wounded soldiers. It definitely was not a luxury liner.

The Bogenschneiders boarded the ship in Swinemünde, with intermediate stops at Kiel, Germany, and Christiansand, Sweden. The ship returned by the northern route, arriving in New York, July 8, 1870, with 954 passengers. An estimated 75 percent of the passengers were German, 15 percent Swedish, and 10 percent Norwegian. From the Shetlands to Newfoundland the weather had been cold and foggy: 3 infants among the passengers died, as did one sailor, of pneumonia. It is believed that Wilhelmine had a miscarriage on the voyage. The normal amount of time during this period to cross the Atlantic from Germany to the U.S. was about 17 days, much better than the five or six weeks it had taken earlier in the century.

From the ship, the family went straight to Castle Garden Immigrant Landing Depot on the southern tip of Manhattan Island, New York. This depot was originally a fort, then a place of entertainment, and then was converted into an immigrant landing depot through which all steerage passengers had to pass. It served this purpose until 1892 when arrivals were moved to Ellis Island. At Castle Garden the family registered, received information, changed money, and washed and ate. August was listed as a "miller baker" in the immigration records. He may have worked in the mill in Luckow that is a tourist attraction today
(Die Luckower Bockwindmühle ). The mill in Luckow was first built around 1824 on Tuleier mountain. In 1853 the mill was remodeled and doubled in size. The Boehlke family acquired the mill in 1856 from a farmer's cooperative. It remained active as a mill until 1961 when plans were made to convert it to a youth center. These plans fell through. By 26 June 1989 Heinz Boehlke was the last owner from Luckow. The mill was sold to municipal authorities from Berlin for 18,000,00 East German Marks. It was developed as an historical mill. In 1992, the municipality of Luckow-Petershagen wanted to dismantle the mill, but was stopped from doing so. Since 01 June 1998 the mill is open again for visitors as a tourist attraction. (It was also in Luckow where August and Wilhelmine were married. A member of the Böhlke family sent a picture of the church to Helen Bogenschneider Moldenhauer in the early 50's. For information on the history of the church, see Die Kirche in Luckow .

Although records seem to indicate that August was a miller, according to family oral history he was a teacher.

Little Karl was amazed by the first black man he ever saw in his life in New York City. The family had the option to see a doctor and to get tickets for their further journey. The family had to be careful of the "friends from the old country," the "confidence men," and other swindlers outside the depot who preyed upon the immigrants.

At this time, the exact route the family took from New York to Wisconsin is not known, but the normal route until the mid 1860s was for Pomeranian immigrants to take a steamship up to Albany, New York, then a train to Buffalo, and then a steamship to Milwaukee in Wisconsin. By the mid 1860s the train from New York through Chicago and then to Milwaukee had become the standard way to travel. Milwaukee had an immigrant aid society to help arriving immigrants. The Pomeranian community in Freistadt north of Milwaukee may have helped August find a farm near Kohlsville, Wisconsin, where he first settled with his family.

The original farm was in Washington County, Wisconsin in the Town of Wayne, near Kohlsville, Wisconsin. August and his family moved from there to the Town of Theresa in Dodge County, Wisconsin between 1876 and 1880.

The 1890 Dodge County Plat Book shows that August owned 40 acres in Section 36, Township Theresa (near Nenno and the intersection of Highway 175 (former Highway 41), Hochheim and West Bend Roads). It is believed that the buildings were demolished when Highway 175 was widened and paved.

The 1910 Dodge County Plat Book shows that August had a residence in Marshville Post Office (Theresa Station) next to the William Dobberpuhl farm. This is where he lived in his retirement years.

1880 census: Married, Male, White, Age 42, Birthplace - Prussia; Occupation - Farmer, Father's Birthplace - Prussia, Mother's Birthplace - Prussia. Census Place - Theresa, Dodge, Wisconsin. Family History Library Film - 1255423, NA Film Number T9-1423. Page Number 415B

1910 U.S. Census: Bogenschneider, Aug, Wisconsin, Dodge, Theresa, Age 72, Male, Race: White, Series: T624 Roll: 1706 Page: 301

**************************************************************************************************************

Notes on the history of the steamship, Western Metropolis, that August Bogenschneider and his family took to the U.S.:

The WESTERN METROPOLIS was a wooden side-paddle steamship built by F. Z. Tucker, Brooklyn, and launched in 1863, for George Griswold, A. Benner,
William Wall, and others; contemporary reports list her as belonging to the firm of Benner & Brown. 2,269 tons as built (remeasured in 1865 at 2,092 tons); 285 ft 4 in x 40 ft 8 in x 23 ft (length x breadth x depth of hold); draft 16 ft; straight stem, 1 funnel, 2 masts. Her engine (75 inch bore; 12 foot stroke) had been built in 1848 by Merrick & Towne, Philadelphia, and had served two Great Lakes steamers, the EMPIRE STATE, built in 1848, and the WESTERN METROPOLIS, built in 1856--it is from this vessel that she took her name--new boilers, wheels, and general reconditioning by Morgan Iron Works. Described by a contemporary, Capt. George H. Norton, as a "very slow, clumsy, unwieldy, hard steering steamer". Chartered by the Quartermaster Corps immediately upon completion for $850 per day, and kept in continuous use from December 1863 until late January 1865. First voyage, New York-New Orleans; on the return voyage, seized the steamer ROSITA, with a cargo of munitions and liquor, and towed her prize into Key West on 29 January 1864. Spent most of 1864 ferrying troops and supplies between New York and Hampton Roads, in support of the Union Army's activities in Virginia; northbound, carried hundreds of sick and wounded. December 1864, loaded troops for the attack on Fort Fisher. 20 February 1865, single roundtrip (and first commercial) voyage, New York-Greytown, chartered to M. O. Roberts. April 1865, single roundtrip voyage, New York-New Orleans, chartered to H. B. Cromwell & Co. May-July 1865, New York-New Orleans, chartered by Quartermaster Corps. August 1865, single roundtrip voyage, New York-New Orleans, chartered to W. H. Robson & Co; returned with a record cargo of 3,000 bales of cotton. 30 September 1865, single roundtrip voyage (her only voyage for her original owners, Benner & Brown), New York-Apalachicola, Florida, returning with a cargo of cotton. November 1865, sold to Ruger Brothers. Originally advertised to sail for the Ruger Brothers' North American Lloyd Line to Bremen via Southampton on 17 March 1866, the WESTERN METROPOLIS did not sail until 28 June 1866. However, she had been refitted with paddle wheels that shed their floats in anything but a dead calm, and the WESTERN METROPOLIS was forced to turn around and put in to Boston, which she reached on 6 July 1866, before all the paddles were lost. After temporary repairs, on 10 July 1866, she sailed for New York (arrived 19 July), unable to continue the voyage to Bremen; laid up. Late 1866, together with the other vessels of the North American Lloyd Line, sold to Isaac Taylor's New York & Bremen Steamship Co. 7 March 1867, first voyage, New York-Cowes-Bremen (arrived after a voyage of 17 days). Continued to make eastbound sailings at approximately eight-week intervals. 24 August 1867, sailed from New York on fourth (and last) voyage for New York & Bremen Steamship Co; 8 September 1867, arrived at Southampton with a broken shaft; repaired at Southampton, and proceeded on to Bremen; on return passage, reached New York 6 November 1867, from Bremen 20 October 1867 and Cowes 22 October 1867, with 921 passengers; there had been 3 deaths on the passage: an infant, a case of delirium tremens, and a case of apoplexy. 30 June 1868, sold for $57,000; her new owner advertised her for sale for the rest of 1868 and all of 1869, without success. 1870, acquired by Merchants' Steamship Co, Frederic Baker, agent, for its New York-New Orleans service. 12 March and 9 April 1870, two roundtrip voyages, New York-New Orleans. 18 May 1870, Capt. H. S. Quick, sailed from New York for Havre-Bremen-Copenhagen-Swinemunde-Kiel-Christiansand, chartered to Ruger Brothers. Returned by the northern route, arriving New York 7 July 1870, with 954 passengers; from the Shetlands to Newfoundland the weather had been cold and foggy: 3 infants among the passengers died, as did one sailor, of pneumonia. September 1870, returned to New York-New Orleans service. October 1871, port shaft cracked on voyage from New York to New Orleans; shaft replaced at sea. February-August 1873, laid up. 13 February 1875, last voyage, New York-New Orleans-New York (arrived 9 March 1875). March 1875, Merchants' Steamship Co ceased operations. 1875-1878, laid up; several changes of ownership reported; last sale to Cornelius Delamater, who bought her for $15,000. March 1878, at the Delamater Iron Works, on the North River side of Manhattan, where her engine was removed. I have no information on her later history or ultimate fate [Cedric Ridgely-Nevitt, American Steamships on the Atlantic (Newark: University of Delaware Press, [1981], pp. 329-330]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 29 August 1998]

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Send mail to webmaster@bogenschneider.org with questions or comments about this web site.
Copyright © 2002-05 Bogenschneider Family
Last modified: 02/28/05
• Wednesday, May 19, 2010
• Gottlieb family and children in Minnesota, 1870-1940
• Kluck_Alexander: is not established by any documentation as a relative of Caroline Pein Truher. Caroline's assertion was repeated, orally, but infrequently. It could be simply a statement of ethnic pride, invented by Caroline. What follows is by Jack Truher in an email 2010-05-19.

Subject: Alexander von Kluck of WW1 YOU DUMB KLUCK
From: Jack Truher
Date: Wed, 19 May 2010 12:39:04 -0700
To: Jim Truher , Michael Truher

Pride goeth before the fall.
You may remember that the Truhers made a genetic claim to a cousin in German General Alexander von Kluck of WW1.  I've learned a bit more, prompted by a story on the German interest in a united states of Europe, something that von Kluck was interested in, using different language.
"Von Kluck is the inspiration for the expression ‘you dumb kluck.’ He is blamed for having departed from the Schlieffen Plan which Germany followed in its attack on France in 1914."
In the retellings of this connection, the "dumb kluck" darivation was missing.  I doubt if Dad knew it.  He would have enjoyed it.
http://dailyreckoning.com/the-tipping-point-2    


  ‘you dumb kluck.’ "Von Kluck is the inspiration for the expression. He is blamed for having departed from the Schlieffen Plan which Germany followed in its attack on France in 1914."

By Bill Bonner

09/02/02 A DR Classique,
first run on this date 2 years ago…

At some point, things will change. They always do. In the markets. In public attitudes. In art, architecture and P/E ratios. Confidence, optimism and self-esteem – at epic highs in America today – will someday, somehow give way. One day, believe it or not, merchants will be reluctant to take dollars. But when?
I missed Francis Fukuyama’s piece in the Wall Street Journal. On New Year’s Eve, he wrote proposing an alternative to TIME’s Man of the Century: Albert Einstein.

Fukuyama nominated WWI German Gen. Alexander von Kluck.
Inadvertently, and perhaps there is no other way, von Kluck changed the course of history. He brought Western Civilization to "the tipping point."

Von Kluck is the inspiration for the expression ‘you dumb kluck.’ He is blamed for having departed from the Schlieffen Plan which Germany followed in its attack on France in 1914.
I have told the story before, from the French perspective. From the German perspective it is not such a happy tale.
Seeing the French army in full retreat before him, von Kluck came to a conclusion that proved too optimistic. He thought the French were nearly beaten. Diverting his troops from the strategic objective – Paris – he decided instead to follow the retreating French troops in order to crush them.
Many German officers questioned the decision. If French troops were really close to giving up, more of them would be surrendering. But there were few prisoners – suggesting that the French still had the will to fight…and that they were merely retreating in good order.
But von Kluck had his way. And the old French warhorse, Galieni, saw his error almost immediately. "Gentlemen," he is supposed to have said to his colleagues, "they offer us their flank." Diverting his troops from the plan, von Kluck had opened a 30-mile gap between his 1st Army and von Bulow’s 2nd Army. He exposed them both to counterattack. The French took advantage of it. They commandeered 600 Paris taxi-cabs to take troops to the front. The battle of the Marne had begun, which after a half a million casualties, brought an end to the German advance.
What would have happened if von Kluck has kept to the plan? Fukuyama speculates, via Ray DeVoe:
* The Germans [would have] swept on to Paris by the end of September, forcing a capitulation by the French government (which occurred in 1870-71 and again in 1940).
* "A quick German victory would have left unimpaired the cultural self-confidence of 19th-century European civilization."
* "The 8.5 million casualties of WWI would not have spawned a radical revolutionary movement in Russia called Bolshevism" – and then Communism.
* With no German military humiliation there would have been no market for rabble-rousers such as Hitler – and no National Socialism.
Mr. Fukuyama states: "there’s more"-
* No Russian Revolution * No Cold War * No Nazism, no World War II, no Holocaust * No Chinese or Vietnamese revolutions
"And the U.S. which came of age as a great power due to the world wars, may have remained the isolationist paradise fondly remembered by Patrick Buchanan," according to the author.
Ray DeVoe refers to von Kluck’s decision as a "tipping point" as defined by Malcolm Gladwell in his book, "Tipping Points." A tipping point, Gladwell says, does not only come after a meal or at the end of taxi ride; instead it is "that one dramatic moment when everything can change all at once." "Tipping points" can be very small things – with very large effects. Also, when changes occur, they often happen all of a sudden
• Tuesday, May 18, 2010
• "Early Years with my 3 sons" by HBT
• A web page gathers a history of Helen Burke Truher with her young family

Subject:
    "Early Years with my 3 sons"
       written by Helen Burke Truher

Date:
      now gathered 3 decades later
      Fri, 18 May 2010
By:
      Jack Truher <jack@truher.net >


The linked URL below may be accessed separately, on the web. I have appended it in this page as well.
http://gene.truher.net/HBT/SeattleAltadena/earlyYears-3sons.html

 
Subject:
    "Early Years with my 3 sons"
       written by Helen Burke Truher

Date:
      now gathered 3 decades later
      Fri, 18 May 2010
By:
      Jack Truher <jack@truher.net >


This file is also at

http://gene.truher.net/HBT/SeattleAltadena/earlyYears-3sons.html
About 1980, my mother wrote a reliable history for her eldest son, Jim Jr., of their shared early years in Washington and Oregon. Then Helen was a struggling young mother in the sometimes wild forests of the Northwest, 1934-1941. With her husband Jim, and sons Jimmie and Jack, the family migrated often to construction camps or nearby apartments, where her husband, Jim, worked as a highway contractor's superintendent and business accountant.

Shorter chapters capture her recollections of her later, more traditionally residential era in Altadena. These latter two chapters recall events similarly for her sons, Jack and Michael.

Note: The five pictures on this web page are a random collection
which Helen Burke Truher had gathered together as representative
of her family life with three sons in Altadena.
image

You can download a larger text image file: 30 MB, 73 pages - in three parts - memories of years with her sons by Helen Burke Truher, written about 1980. It has a weakly printed pages.

This text should download as a single 30 MB PDF file to your desktop from the link just below.

http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/SeattleAltadena/HBT-EarlyYears-w3Boys.pdf
Contents: HBT recollection on years shared with each of three sons
pg 01-50 w JWT2
pg 51-63 w JBT
pg 64-73 w MBT
I can make reading the first 9 of those 73 pages a little easier, as I had earlier converted those typed pages to digital format with some Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software. I ultimately found that completing the OCR task was too time consuming among priorities.
Here below are the OSC converted 9 pages are available on the web:

http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/SeattleAltadena/HBTxt-JWT2-5m0510a.doc
http://www.truher.net/gene/HBTSeattleAltadena//HBTxt-JWT2-5m0510a.pdf
image

My mother's story gains context from album pictures she had gathered, and which I had digitized for web display in various ways.

For example, here are the family album pictures from the Seattle years (album PA1) in a separate web page:

http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/HBT-PA1-wComment.html

and the relevant pictures from two other of mother's albums from the same era:

http://gene.truher.net/HBT/PA02/PA02-PA03-tempPg.html

image

I have recently reestablished my more comprehensive genealogy web site, which includes the Burke and Ford lines.
http://gene.truher.net/TBF.ntweb/

The URL above has all the same pictures and text for mother's photo album, but you might prefer the format from the URL below.

http://gene.truher.net/HBT/HBTalbums-xhtml/toc.html

image

I found Helen's typically thoughtful response from mother to her grown son, Jack in 1972:

http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/HBT-WWII-1972-1of3web.jpg



image
email Jack

• Tuesday, April 20, 2010
• Scenic -Washington - 1927 -family of McLeod
 A Family History of Scenic, WA
and the surrounding area

INTO THE WILDERNESS

by Charlotte McLeod

gary.mcleod@verizon.net

The year 1927 was a momentous one for the Faulkner family. In the spring of that year the decision was made that all of us (my mother, two sisters and I) were to spend the summer in the Cascade Mountains at Scenic, Washington, once known as Scenic Hot Springs. What excitement! We had been born and reared in the High Desert country of Eastern Oregon, and when I was ten years old we moved to Portland. We loved all the new experiences of city life, but going to Scenic was like going on an extended summer vacation with all the fun and freedom that we associated with Eastern Oregon. There was also an unknown wilderness to be explored! Our father, Charles M. Faulkner, was a civil engineer working for A. Guthrie and Company, prime contractor for construction of the new eight-mile railroad tunnel, which was planned to replace a much shorter tunnel, several miles of snow sheds and numerous switch-backs.

Our dad had been at Scenic for some time, and his letters home stimulated our interest further. He was living in the old Scenic Hot Springs Hotel, a rustic log structure, where he also took his meals. The headquarter offices too were located there, a convenient asset-I guess! The fact that he shared his quarters with an assortment of rats, mice and other critters did not dampen our enthusiasm and we enjoyed his written accounts of battling these nightly visitors. Just how long he had resided there prior to our arrival I can't recall. But work on the tunnel was well under way by the time of our appearance on the scene. And our newly built home had been ready for some time.

Back in Portland my mother had spent a busy spring preparing for our anticipated migration. Among other tasks, she made each of us a pair of tweed knickers that buttoned just below the knee, the latest fashion, I suppose, for the young lady hiker. I remember those knickers with no great affection because the all-wool tweed was scratchy, something of a punishment to wear. But wear them we did, for hiking soon became our favorite pastime.

When school was out in June our father arrived in Portland in a shiny black Model "T" Ford. It must have been loaded to the breaking point on its long trip north with five passengers and all their accoutrements. That it did hold up speaks well for Henry Ford and his Model "T". I do remember, however, that it no longer looked new or shiny upon arrival in Scenic, encased as it was in a thick coat of dust. Traveling the Stevens Pass highway today, I myself tend to forget that it was a narrow dusty trail 74 years ago. But traffic was blessedly sparse!

Anyone trying to locate the town of Scenic today must be very alert. Three buildings are visible from the highway, but they are set so far back among the trees that they are easily overlooked. Only after you turn off the highway at the intersection do you see a rather unofficial-looking sign saying "Scenic". It is just about midway between the West Portal of the tunnel and Deception Creek Falls.

The school and the teacher's residence, set a little apart from the string of houses, were built after we arrived. With the exception of the hotel and the railroad station, the buildings were of raw wood, unpainted. But Scenic was definitely alive and thriving, with its own post office and grocery store. Flowers were blooming in window boxes and children's voices could be heard in the distance.

As one entered the town from the highway two houses stood alone on the left. These were occupied originally by the two chief engineers, one representing the Great Northern Railroad and the other representing A. Guthrie and Company. (One of these homes burned down many years ago.) The six other smaller homes faced the Tye River, about equal distance from one another, a little like a string of beads. They were of simple construction and basically alike, but adapted to individual family needs. Because we were slated to occupy ours only in the summer, we expected the plain accommodations and the odds and ends of furniture that we encountered. We did have electricity and very cold running water; and a big cast-iron stove graced the kitchen. I am not sure, but I think that stove also supplied us with hot water. I know that its cozy warmth was very welcome on cool-to-nippy mornings. A space heater in the living area was our only other source of heat.

A wood range was no novelty to my mother, and she did not seem to mind this austerity. She not only cooked the family's meals, but would entertain at dinner and bridge with apparent ease. She never seemed to miss her best china and silver. Perhaps to her it was akin to playing house.

We did have one luxury that none of us anticipated; air conditioning! We needed only to open the front and back doors, and the draft, which accompanied the Tye River in its course quickly and thoroughly cooled the house. And it didn't cost a cent! It also stopped all but the most urgent conversation. Competing with the Tye was not always easy.
To complete a rather complicated picture, I must mention that work on the tunnel occurred simultaneously at three different locations: the West Portal, near Scenic; the East Portal at Berne; and Mill Creek, about midway between the two, where work proceeded in both directions. Access was gained by way of a vertical shaft. This was a very complicated engineering feat in the days before computers and remains today something of a marvel. I feel privileged to have been a spectator during these historic times. I wonder how many others can still recall the excitement of that era! It is good to realize that seventy-five years later the Cascade Tunnel is alive and well, serving the purpose it was designed to serve.

In addition to the eight houses at Scenic, there was a large group of homes about a half-mile to the east-perhaps forty buildings. And beyond this settlement, closer to the tunnel mouth was an assortment of barracks and offices, a cookhouse, a hospital, etc.
Berne, at the East Portal, boasted only a few structures, a dozen at most. It was located in a canyon and construction could not have been easy. On the other hand, Mill Creek was situated in a broad valley and was a fair-sized community with about 20 houses, barracks and a cookhouse. These statistics are largely guess-work. Looking back seventy-five years is not easy or accurate, but I wanted to give the reader some idea of the scope of operations during construction. The needs of many people had to be met in an area almost devoid of population and facilities.

Aside from the excitement of construction, life was serene at Scenic. We stepped right into an active social life, and at the same time became entrepreneurs. At fourteen years I had never heard that term before! We learned in a hurry about the "Law of Supply and Demand". As far as I know, we were the only candidates for the position of babysitter. Thus we could afford to demand the magnificent sum of twenty-five cents an hour for our services, inexperienced as we were. We became wage earners in a hurry. I can't say that I loved my work, but I did love my wages, and thus returned to Portland in the fall with a comfortable little nest egg.

Strangely enough, a lack of teenage companionship did not seem to be very important at the moment. The adults, all fairly young, often included us in their activities and our hiking expeditions were open to all ages. With both our mother and father at home regularly, we became family oriented in a way we had not experienced during our years in Portland. Anyway, we were well accustomed to providing our own entertainment; and an assortment of board games and playing cards had been an important part of our luggage. Included was everything from Parcheesi to auction bridge. And both our parents joined our threesome at one time or another. Books, always a staple in our lives, were there in abundance, ordered regularly from the State Library in Olympia. And then there was the great outdoors which we exploited to the limit of our endurance.

Extra events, too, kept popping up. Dances were held several times a year at a the hotel, with live music. Normally my father would have said NO with a capital N! A fourteen-year-old girl was too young for such an affair. For some unaccountable reason he allowed all of us to go, including my twelve-year-old sister, knowing, I suppose that he would be there to keep an eye on things. I was glad to be included, but mostly I felt ill at ease and awkward around all those well-seasoned "veterans". Much more to my liking were the annual picnics at Lake Wenatchee, hosted by the contractor, A. Guthrie & Company. Cougar Inn, familiar to so many Wenatchee Valley residents, catered our food. It was a fabulous spread served on a large screened porch overlooking the lake. Although my memory is unreliable, it is certain that we did justice to everything. The rest of the day we spent running in and out of the icy lake or circling about in a large sail boat, driven by a strong wind, for which Lake Wenatchee is noted. What bliss!

Then there were other expeditions, which defy classification. Steve, the cook at the West Portal camp, was the instigator of at least one day-long trip that I recall. Steve merits a paragraph or two simply because he was unique. Both in size and reputation, he was impressive-with a heart that matched his size. He was a tyrant in the kitchen, but as mild as a lamb outside. A native of Sweden, his speech was a mixture of Swedish and English, which to us was highly entertaining. He liked young people in particular, so we were always welcome at the cookhouse. We liked going, too, partly because he was sure to have a good stock of pastry on hand, usually "yelly rolls". The mere mention of "yelly rolls" would send us into a fit of suppressed laughter. I myself did not really like jelly rolls, but I never turned Steve down and managed to consume a good-sized slab in a masterly fashion to demonstrate my appreciate.

In the kitchen nobody ever dreamed of crossing Steve. His shopping list was rarely altered, and he believed in both quantity and quality. Above all, he kept the workers happy and on the job. So he was king of the realm! He was rumored to have a goodly sum of money stashed away, and my father believed that he was financing a college education for a young friend. Steve probably enjoyed his own food too much, and his health suffered accordingly. He died at a fairly young age. I wish I could remember his last name!

I remember vividly one excursion with Steve. We spent an entire day with friends of his in Monroe. I do not recall any details about our host and hostess, other than the fact that they were very hospitable. But I do remember their huge cherry tree, because we spent a good part of the day feasting on ripe cherries; and then we topped it off with big slices of watermelon. Rest stops were few between Monroe and Scenic and the trip seemed endless.
Looking back on those days, I feel that we experienced Scenic at its best. In comparison, it seems dead today, to have no real excuse for being. In addition to the fun and excitement of the late 1920's, it lent us a kinship with the mountains and the forests, and a deep appreciation for lakes and meadows never seen from the highway. Hiking became a way of life, which we pursued in later years whenever the opportunity presented itself. I think my mother enjoyed the experience as much as my sisters and I did. She kept in touch with several of her Scenic friends for many years. Our stay in Scenic probably influenced our lives more than we realized at the time; and it certainly gave us an outlet for a lot of pent-up energy. That was probably a major benefit after several years of apartment living. What a memorable time it was.

Today, I cannot say for sure how many of the original houses still stand because a chain across the road deters me from walking far. Two homes appear to have new siding, so they are hard to identify. It is likely that seven out of eight buildings are standing, and used at least part of the year. On my rare visits I have never seen a single person, or even a parked car, in the area. Our house stands brightly painted and inviting. Maintenance seems to have been good and the vegetation has flourished. The Tye River still rushes by noisily, but beyond the Tye lay masses of rubble (tailings from the tunnel) on which railroad tracks were permanently laid after construction of the tunnel was complete. For years this dike or tressie was an eye sore, but nature finally took pity, and today dense vegetation completely conceals the rubble. The hotel, railroad station and bridges are only memories. I sometimes wonder how much peace and quiet exist there at train time.

The trail to Lake Surprise has been completely rerouted and now connects to the Cascade Crest Trail. I would be hard-pressed to locate the trailhead. Berne appears to be uninhabited, and Mill Creek is so overgrown with vegetation that it would be difficult to find even a foundation. It is possible to climb up to Lake Josephine from there, and I am told that a ski lift has been installed in recent years, so quite a few people must visit Mill Creek some times of the year. Power lines have intruded on the landscape for many years, and they do little to enhance the beauty of the surrounding mountains. But that is progress, I presume. All the hustle and bustle of construction years have evaporated long ago. Only at Scenic have the houses remained intact; a blessing, I guess! It is certainly a monument to a past era, worthy of a little recognition.


http://www.gngoat.org/scenic_wa.htm
• Monday, April 27, 2009
• HBT Photo Album PA02 √ Jim2-Jack 1930s-1950s (21 pages, no text)
 
• HBT Photo Album PA03 Jim2-Jack 1930s-1950s (3 pic pages, no text)
 
• Saturday, November 29, 2008
• Fords of Ohio, Plum Run Cemetery, 19th century. √
• Early Ford immigrant family was spread from Ohio's Warren County. Cemetery monuments still stand (some toppled) at the Plum Run Cemertery, Hamilton Township, Warren County, Ohio.

same link:
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ohwarren/Cemetery/PlumRun/

2008m1129 Ron Haack and Jack are in communication to revised his excellent Family Tree Makes ancestor charts and data. I will cite whatever I can here in coming weeks - if all goes well. Lots more data available on my hard drive under genealogy-ford folders than in this section.

2010m0424 Here is a file I made by extracting from a Plum Run cemetery web site:

http://gene.truher.net/ford/FordFamilyGraves-PlumRun.html

 To: -Haack_Ronald
From: Jack Truher <
jack@truher.net >
Subject: Ford Family plot, Plum Run Cemetery, Warren County, Ohio.

Ron - We have looked at the cemetery information and pictures you found. We have enjoyed this neat finding. I have a vague recollection that you had located this cemetery in lesser detail a few years ago, but I may be imagining.

I have reconciled the information from the tombstone-explanation and whatever the researcher noted, with the chart data you sent us yesterday, generated ultimately from Nancy's family history records.

I'm assuming that you got all this new information from the web Ancestry.com web page. We are not inclined to assume upkeep for the graveyard plot.

This is an unrelated problem at bottom of the chart. Kelley and Nancy Ann Scott are the parents of Flora Scott Kelley, who, with husband Harry Smith, were the parents of Fleta May Smith. John Bayersdoerfer and Anna Edelman were the parents of five children, one of whom was Bessie Bayersdoerfer. The chart you sent is inaccurate on these points..

As to the old Ford cemetery, the ancestors chart is consistent with the cemetery photos. To reconcile these two information sources, that is the ancestors data from Nancy's family and the cemetery information, we can make a few additions to the ancestor chart from the cemetery data.

With additional detail on these persons as appears on the photos, I decided that it is likely, from the cemetery data that Henry Ford (born 1780) and Susannah Unknown had at least, not two, but four children; that is, two additional sons: one is James A. Ford (b.1820) and the other is Samuel D. Ford (b.1823). James A. Ford had a wife listed as Mary Jane, and Samuel D. Ford's wife is Margaret E. Ford. Of course any of the three brothers of Henry Ford (b.1780) could have been the fathers of the "two additional sons". If you have a way to include them on the chart (with dotted connecting lines?), that would be fine with me, but not necessary.

The first of these two sons, James A., and his wife had two children who lived only briefly, and they were Henry and John.

The reason I am persuaded that Henry Ford, born 1780, had these four sons was by the rhythm of their birth dates, which are in reasonable sequence: Richard (born 1812), Henry (born 1817), James (born 1820), Samuel (born 1823)-- a very good bet that they were brothers.

One additional likelihood is that the final unidentified cemetery person of the Ford gravestones, Edella Ford, 1860-1890, was probably the last child of Richard Ford, born 1812, and Cynthia Ann Ludlum, born 1817. Nancy assures me that her assumed mother, Cynthia, could have given birth at age 43. I would like you to just show Edella on our chart that way. We have identified all the other cemetery residents. If you like, you could make a note of the uncertainty on the chart, or even make the line dotted, or a note in the data base.

With these changes, your Ford Chart includes everyone in the cemetery, over a time frame of nearly 150 years, over 3 to 5 generations preceding our own.

If you find these recommendations agreeable, we'll be interested to see the revised chart - anytime you might get around to it.

thanks again - Jack
 revised this listing sometime

Plum Run Cemetary web site, also has Cynthia Ann Ford's many relatives, to include:

------------------------------------
Benjamin Ludlum
born
17 Jan 1818
[rest of stone missing, transcription in Warren County Cemetery Records Volume 5 says
died 26 April 1843
aged 24 years 9 months and 22 days] Photo contributed by Cheryl Jordan 9 April 2005

Benjamin & Margaret Ludlum Monument
------------------------------------
Benjamin Ludlum
died July 14, 1881
aged 88 years 11 months 16 days Margaret Ludlum
died Sept. 9, 1867
aged 73 years & 29 days
------------------------------------

Photos contributed by Cheryl Jordan 12 August 2004


Harriet & Joseph Ludlum Family
(individual stones arranged left to right in the following order)
------------------------------------
Sacred to the memory of
Harriet
wife of Joseph Ludlum
who departed this life
August 16, 1846 aged 48 years 3 months & 14 days Photos contributed by Cheryl Jordan 5 August 2004 [broken stone - bottom of inscription taken from
Warren County Cemetery Records Volume 5]
Sacred to the memory of
------------------------------------
Joseph Ludlum,
who departed this life
April 24, 1845
aged 48 years and 4 months Photo contributed by Cheryl Jordan 8 August 2004
Matthias B..
son of
Joseph & Harriet Ludlum
died Sept 30, 1834
aged 6 months Photo contributed by Cheryl Jordan 11 August 2004
------------------------------------
Margaret A. Ludlum
daughter of
Joseph & Harriet Ludlum
died Feb. 4, 1833
aged 6 months Photo contributed by Cheryl Jordan 8 & 10 Aug 2004
Jonathan F. Ludlum
son of
Joseph & Harriet Ludlum
died Sept. 19, 1831
aged 11 months Photo contributed by Cheryl Jordan 8 August 2004
George B. Ludlum
son of
Joseph & Harriet Ludlum
died Nov. 27, 1822
aged 2 years & 6 months Photo contributed by Cheryl Jordan 8 August 2004


Epitaph
Sacred to the memory of
Addison Smith Ludlum
son of
Joseph & Harriet Ludlum
who departed this life
Jan 7, 1848
aged 24 years & 1 month Photos contributed by Cheryl Jordan 8 & 12 Aug 2004
Clifton
son of A. M. & E. Ludlum
died July 30, 18?6
aged 8 months & 11 days
[Difficult to read inscription. The year "looks like" 1876 but see Eliza, below, (who is perhaps his mother) who is said to have died in 1836] Photos contributed by Cheryl Jordan 9 August 2004
In Memory of
Eliza
consort of Aaron M. Ludlow [perhaps should be Ludlum? - see Clifton Ludlum above]
who came from Elizabethtown, N.J. Sept 8, 1835 &died at Joseph Ludlum's
April 27, 1836
aged 28 years 1 months and 5 days. Photos contributed by Cheryl Jordan 11 August 2004
[stone barely legible - entire inscription taken from
Warren County Cemetery Records Volume 5]

------------------------------------

Eli T. Ludlum
born Nov. 23, 1821
died May 20, 1851
aged 29 years 5 months & 27 days
Photo contributed by Cheryl Jordan 8 August
[broken stone - bottom of inscription taken from
Warren County Cemetery Records Volume 5]
James Ludlum
born Oct. 15, 1826
died May 4, 1851
aged 24 years & 1 month & 19 days Photo contributed by Cheryl Jordan 8 August
Mary
wife of
Smith Ludlum
died Oct 22, 1865
aged 70 years & 24 days Photo contributed by Cheryl Jordan 8 August
[difficult to read - inscription taken in part from
Warren County Cemetery Records Volume 5]
Smith Ludlum
born Aug. 1, 1794
died Dec. 31, 1842
aged 48 years 4 months & 30 days Photo contributed by Cheryl Jordan 8 August


• Monday, February 25, 2008
• Haack_Ron's, great genealogy charts
 Ron adds (2008-02-25) three excellent charts on Truher descendants by Gottlieb . Right-click and download these PDFs to desktop to open with Adobe Reader. The pageless hourglass is the most complete and most interesting, though it can not be printed. It's great for on-line viewing.
 Ron adds (2008-02-25) three similar charts on truher descendants by Jakob. Right-click and download these PDFs to desktop to open with Adobe Reader. These are similarly:
• Saturday, December 8, 2007
• HBT Photo Album PA03 Jim2-Jack 1930s-1950s (3 pic pages, no text)
• three pages here:

http://gene.truher.net/HBT/PA03/PA03-pg-01.jpg

http://gene.truher.net/HBT/PA03/PA03-pg-02.jpg

http://gene.truher.net/HBT/PA03/PA03-pg-03.jpg

There's some more pages about Jack only, but not scanned yet here.

also at:
http://gene.truher.net/HBT/PA02/PA02-PA03-tempPg.html

best I can do for the moment ; Mary Truher Albert is working on a hardcopy version.
• Wednesday, October 31, 2007
• Electrified trains in Cascade Tunnel 1929-1956 with Truhers nearby.
 Electrified trains in Cascade Tunnel 1929-1956 with Truhers nearby.

This page is taken from Jack's email sent on 2007m1031.

Jim and Jack know of history at Scenic and Berne, Washington State. I ran across some web resources on the Cascade Tunnel between two small towns, Scenic on the West, and Berne on the East. There our Dad was a highway superintendent and paymaster for a small construction company at intervals in years 1938-1942. The indented text segments are extracted quotes:

History

The first tunnel had a fume problem because it was built too steep and too close to the
ruling grade. The tunnel was electrified by 1909, which eliminated the fume problem.

The second Cascade Tunnel was constructed between 1925 and 1929 to replace the shorter, higher-elevation tunnel which was still plagued by snowslides in the area. The new alignment is a straight-line tunnel running between
Berne and Scenic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cascade_Tunnel

 Perhaps dad was doing some maintenance on the tunnel itself? I don't think so. I recall a story by mom about dad blowing tree stumps across the highway with dynamite. I learn here that there were two tunnels, one built in 1909 and a shorter one in 1929. The pictures attached are of the 1929 work.

529.jpg is a picture typical of the work crews of the 1929 construction era. This was the world that dad was part of, though not exactly this tunnel construction year.

trainElectric-WestBound.jpg is a picture of the electrified train. I don't recall any talk about electrified trains, but this one appears to be at the Scenic portal entrance where Jim and I were very young for a couple summers. Mother was eager to get back toward Seattle, pregnant with me, when the snow was due.

Just outside the western portal of the Cascade Tunnel the Z-1 Electric crosses the steel bridge over Surprize Creek. It has 3 powerful units pulling freight West bound on this wintry day. Built by Baldwin/ Westinghouse early in 1928, it ran until it’s retirement in 1956. The Cascade Tunnel is one of America greatest early engineering feats being almost 8 miles long and absolutely straight end to end with less than 2% grade descending East to West. The tunnel relieved the Great Northern from its history of snow hazards in that area, decreased the distance traveled and transformed the route to a uniform, efficient and pleasant trip. Jordan Art Works 2238 Mountain Brook Lane Ooltewah, TN 37363 Artist, Jim Jordan Website: http://www.jordanart.com Email: jim@jordanart.com

http://www1.newriver.com/

from those resources, there's a fine slideshow that includes this Great Northern route through the Cascades, some electrified. If you interrupt that slide show, you get text for the trainElectric that reads:

West Bound Electrics
Just outside the western portal of the Cascade Tunnel the Z-1 Electric crosses the steel bridge over Surprize Creek.

It has 3 powerful units pulling freight West bound on this wintry day.  Built by Baldwin/Westinghouse early in 1928, it ran until it's retirement in 1956.

The Cascade Tunnel is one of America's greatest early engineering feats being almost 8 miles long and absolutely straight end to end with less than 2% (percent) grade descending East to West.  The tunnel relieved the Great Northern from its history of snow hazards in that area, decreased the distance traveled and transformed the route to a uniform, efficient and pleasant trip.

So indeed our Cascade Tunnel ran electrified in the period when we boys were there.

• Friday, October 5, 2007
• Genographic Journey - Ten Thousand Years ago - Truher Men -
• When dad's brother Lewis married a woman of Polish heritage in the 1930s, his German parents, August and Nellie bitterly opposed the marriage. There is some irony in how August's Truher family was prejudiced against the Poles.

It turns out that our male genealogy mutation R17 (Haplogroup R1a), is shared with half of Russians and Poles, but only a quarter of all Germans. Our linear male Truher originator shares origin more with Central Asians and East Europeans than the average German.

Whereas Truher Men - have haplogroup R1a for M17 mutation - question has been what percentage of European ethnicities share this M17 male mutation? Jack found the answer in a Wikimedia site (as at bottom) which is generally consistent with what else I have read in the National Geographic genographics site. The short answer is that the R17 mutation appears in about a quarter of all Germans, but in about a half of all Poles and Russians. This is from a
researcher at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

There are two competing hypotheses for locus of the M17 mutation, the first is more often in favor: (1) the Kurgan Hypothesis for origin in Ukranian Steppes, and (2) the Altaians Hypothesis, which is shown in east Russia, mid-latitutes, with symbol, AL on this map.

Page 2 of
set of maps shows distribution of M17 in yellow coloration. Red color represents mutation R1b, more typically Western European cro-magnon origin perhaps from Iberian Peninsula. 

from
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurgan_hypothesis

Genetics

Distribution of R1a (yellow in attached map)

A specific
haplogroup R1a1 defined by the M17 (SNP marker) of the Y chromosome (see:[4] for nomenclature) is associated by some with the Kurgan culture. The haplogroup R1a1 is currently found in Slavic populations and in central and western Asia, India, but it is rare in most countries of Western Europe (e.g. France, or some parts of Great Britain) (see [5] [6]). However, 23.6% of Norwegians, 18.4% of Swedes, 16.5% of Danes, 11% of Saami share this lineage ([7]).
Investigations suggest the Hg R1a1 gene expanded from the Dniepr-Don Valley, between 13 000 and 7600 years ago, and was linked to the reindeer hunters of the
Ahrensburg culture that started from the Dniepr valley in Ukraine and reached Scandinavia 12 000 years ago.[4]

Ornella Semino et al. (see
[8]) propose this postglacial spread of the R1a1 gene from the Ukrainian LGM refuge was magnified by the expansion of the Kurgan culture into Europe and eastward. R1a1 is most prevalent in Poland, Russia, Ukraine, Hungary and is also observed in Pakistan, India, and central Asia.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurgan_hypothesis

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Y-Haplogroup_R1_distribution.png

http://www.scs.uiuc.edu/~mcdonald/WorldHaplogroupsMaps.pdf
• The test costs about a hundred dollars. Most Western Europeans took the route of the Cro-Magnons into France, known by the cave drawings they left. Our paternal line were East Germans in the 19th century. Our ancestors had unexpectedly taken a sharp left turn toward the Ukraine and Central Asia some 10 thousand years ago. These were the genetic Haplogroup M17 as on page 4 of the PDF link at bottom.

These people became the first skilled horsemen and carriage-makers (Kurgan people). They were also founders of of all the Indo-European languages, as explained at bottom of page 6 of the same PDF. This particular male gene is more often shared with Czechs, Siberians, and Central Asians today, than with Western Europeans. Of course, our particular male line is just one of many thousands of other European genetic contributors.

We can speculate further. We can imagine that the name Truher may be derived somehow from the Kurgan era. My great grandfather referred to his own European work as "wagon-maker", at least in later conversations with family. "Truhe" is a German noun for trunk or container of goods, So Truher is one who makes travelers' wagons. Not likely a Kurgan word, but we can dream.

It's better to right-click and download this link to desktop. Then open it in a PDF reader like Adobe Acrobat Reader.

http://gene.truher.net/truher/Genographic-TruherMen-7pg.pdf
• Sunday, September 9, 2007
• Genographic Journey - Ten Thousand Years ago - Truher Men -
• This page is about Jack's DNA genographic test by the National Geographic Society. That result traces the actual geographical travels which the linear ancestor of our male Truher line took some ten thousand years ago out of Africa toward Europe.
• Sunday, August 26, 2007
• Haack_Ron's, great genealogy charts
 Haack: -- related to Truher through Augusta Truher Haack (1876-1953), cousin Ron's grandmother, and sister to Jack's grandfather.

Frank: -- related to Truher through husband of Matheldie Helene Truher Frank, Augusta's sister.  Matheldie now has her own hourglass chart. I feel like I know  these sisters, Matheldie and Augusta, of August better now -  though the pictures and stories that Ron has sent me which give breadth and context to grandfather August Truher's relatives.  

Deuel:  -- related to Truher through husband of Delilah Henrietta Haack Deuel (1899-1983), daughter of Augusta Truher Haack

Burke: -- related to Truher through Helen Burke Truher,  mother of Jim , Jack, Michael Truher..

Pinske: -- related to Truher through Gustave E. Pinske (1847-1911) who married Caroline Lietzau (1849-1923), daughter of Florentine Lietzau Truher.  Caroline Lietzau is grandmother of Pat Schonborg (Palmetta Lauretta Gill (1925 - )

Zadach: -- related to Truher through Amelia Haack (1867-1949),  (descendant of Jakob Truher) who was married to John Louis Zadach - abd related to the current Professor Larry Fike (not Jack's  blood relative) which Jack Truher discovered working at Washington State (Spokane or similar univ)

Muelling: -- related to Truher through Frederick Muelling (1857-1926) who is maternal grandfather of Ronald Herbert Haack (1937 - )

Jaeger: -- related to Truher through Wilhelm Bogislav Jaeger (1791 - ) is generations antecedent to Ronald Herbert Haack (1937 - )

Globke: -- related to Truher through grandfather of Augusta Truher Haack's husband, William Carl "Will" Haack.

------------------------------------

reformatted and with minor revisions on 2007m0826 JBT

for this text, go to:

http://gene.truher.net/TBF.ntweb

-- and open sections in sequence
Contents,
Truher,
Haack_Ron's great genealogy charts,
Cousin Ron Haack's wonderful web genealogy charts
On Ron's Genealogy Web Site

• What are the many other surname connections to Truher surname, to be found on Ron Haack's genealogy web site,  

http://www.mickey-cookie.whsites.com/family_tree/

Many of these relations are remote to the immediate interest of a Truher oriented reader.  But the connections are real, and indicate the richness of the lives Ron Haack and researched and from which we were (unfortunately) so disconnected personally.  But there are cultural connections.  We learn more about ourselves when we consider what choices our relatives made.  Finally we can learn more of we are part of known 19th and early 20th century history.
• http://www.mickey-cookie.whsites.com/family_tree/

here is one exchange of email - revised for sharing here

Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2005 17:00:32 -0800
To:
cookierhh@verizon.net
From: Jack Truher <
jbt@truher.net >

Subject: map of Minneapolis and various cousins

Ron and Jack have been in communication since before 1998. Ron's cornacopea of descendant charts

is
http://www.mickey-cookie.whsites.com/family_tree/

and outlines which includes the Truher and Burke family. Look at the section under Truher. Of special interest, you find reports on Truher and Burke family, and our Haack cousins. Ron has also done a big chunk recently on the Fords, Jack's wife's family. The Pinske family is covered which was most closely connected to the Truher family in Western Minnesota in the late 19th century. Many of the other reports and pictures involved in-laws and relations to Truher family.

Ron accepted my summary (next section) of the basic surname connections, how the named blood lines in his genealogy charts connect with Truher family folks, or somebody I know, or how those surnames don't connect.

The best way to follow the learn the connections, I think, is to begin with an hourglass for each of the siblings: August (my grandfather), Augusta (Ron's grandmother), and Matheldie Truher. Florentine's descendant's combines these three charts. These hourglass charts for now do not expand the three siblings spouses trees into their past. I guess to do so makes for too elaborate a chart. We have to go to Ron's other charts for that.
 Ron's collection of descendant charts can be found at
• Sunday, March 4, 2007
• HBT Photo Album PA13 √ Jim2 1953-1957 college sports
 
• album page HBT_PA13_01
• Monday, November 27, 2006
• August-Nellie
 Date: November 27, 2006 From: Jack Truher <jack@truher.net >
Subject:
August Truher, Tacoma's Union Station 1911, and August's in rail accident in 1913.
Bcc: -Haack_Ronald, Mary Albert <
mary@thealberts.org >, Jim Truher III <jtruher@oz.net >, JWT <jim@truher.com >, MBT <truone@verizon.net >
X-Attachments: :Mac HD:134235:milw.gif: :Mac HD:23137858:MilwaukeeRoadStation-#9FC63.jpg: :Mac HD:696920:AugustRails1860.jpg: :Mac HD:696920:AugustRails1890.jpg: :Mac HD:134235:union_ext.jpg: :Mac HD:696920:Milwaukee Road Video.jpg: :Mac HD:696920:Milwuakee_road_1947.jpg:

August Truher was long-time conductor for Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway (commonly called Milwaukee Road).

pictures in message below also are attached.


I found a picture of the recently rehabilitated Tacoma Union Station, which was the West Coast terminus for grampa August Truher's many working years out of Kent, Seattle, and Riverton Heights, Washington.


1911  
Tacoma Union Station, Tacoma, Wash., opens, May 1. Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway opens service to Washington, competing with the Northern Pacific and Great Northern, May 29. North Coast Limited service extended from St. Paul, Minn., to Chicago, Ill., via Chicago and Northwestern, December 17.

The Union Station has been rehabilitated as part of a renewal of downtown Tacoma, including a branch of University of Washington,

http://www.tacoma.washington.edu/

http://www.tacoma.washington.edu/shopuwt/business_detail.cfm?business_ID=30

a history of the Great Northern Railroad 

http://www.employees.org/~davison/nprha/first.html


We have the picture of an eastern terminus rail station in Milwaukee, further indicating the grand investment associated with rail travel and transport in that era.



http://www.tacoma.washington.edu/shopuwt/business_detail.cfm?business_ID=30


I found the first web page below on google in 2001, which can not be found today on google. It shows that August Truher was working on the Milwaukee Road rail line in 1913 when a derailment accident occurred. Milwaukee Road was formally
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific.

I saw a photo of the
The first link below lists:

Milwaukee Road Employees Involved in ICC Reportable Accidents, 1911-1940

Truher, August

Conductor
Ranier, Washington

Jul. 3, 1913

278
Derailment

Date: Sat, 20 Oct 2001 06:20:30 -0800
To: Haack_Ronald
From: Jack Truher <
truher@sirius.com >
Subject:
August Truher in rail accident in 1913.
Cc:
Bcc:

Search on web page for name Truher, who was conductor, working for Milwaukee Road in 1913, involved in a derailment accident, on the Ranier run. My father was 5 years old. August working steady. Perhaps the conductor promotion opportunity is what brought him out west, more than family estrangement.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~sponholz/iccpart02.html

also of interest

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~sponholz/index.html

and

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~sponholz/milwroad.html

 To: "Ron Haack" <cookierhh@verizon.net >
From: Jack Truher <
truher@earthlink.net >
Subject: Re: August Truher Timeline
Cc:
Bcc:

Jack,

Attached is a Family TreeMaker Timeline of August Truher, his wife Nellie and his five children. I hope you can read it ok, if not, I will post it on the site.

What an interesting presentation. Both versions 1,2 have a text location problem with Louis Truher. The text sits to right of the box. Box itself for Louis is blank. Those history events add a lot to my way of thinking about the dates.


Now, to the best of your knowledge, fill in his work timeline at the Milwaukee Road. We know he was working as a brakeman as early as 1891, from the Minneapolis City Directory, and that the entire family left the farm at Wild Rice Township, Norman County Minnesota, about 1886, when August was about 20 years old. He would have been about 25 when he was a brakeman, maybe even younger, we do not know.

I recall that the wedding announcement in the Austin paper said he was a brakeman then. I have had the understanding that a railroad worker had to qualify and serve time in rank, including for some time as engineer, before becoming a conductor, which is how he is presumed to have been working for all latter years.


Try to estimate when he retired. We know his name was mentioned in a rail accident way out west about July 3, 1913. In 1913, he would have been about 47 years old. When did you think he tried to retire, what age? At the Milwaukee Road's bankruptcy in 1925, he would have been about 59 years old, getting pretty close. At the Milwaukee's exit from the 1925 bankruptcy in 1928, he would have been 62. By the next bankruptcy in 1935, he would have been 69 years old, in the middle of the Great Depression. Pole the family on this one.

Michael would have no idea. Jim Jr. might know something. Could take a few days. They don't linger on these ideas.

Certainly August worked past 1935. In those rough years, when I was born, he was the only one with a regular job. In those years, nobody thought that 59 years old was normal retirement. 65 was the expectation as in soc security, and August had to work until later. I have the memory, if vague in detail, he had to work until age 74; that would mean retirement in 1941, which is consistent with my mental timeline. That picture of August and I in Altadena was in 1945 I think, just a couple years before August died. Also consistent with my timeline. The year 1941 is my best guess for August retirement. I'll ask Jim if he can remember anything.


"In 1905, the Milwaukee decided to expand west again, this time to Puget Sound. The "Lines West" were built between 1906 and 1909, from the middle of South Dakota to Seattle/Tacoma. Technological marvels, the lines were never successful, and were a major contributor to the bankruptcy in 1925. In 1928 the Road reorganized as the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific. It was bankrupt again in 1935 and 1945. In 1977, once more in financial trouble, it reorganized and shed two-thirds of its trackage. It was acquired by the Soo Line Corp. on February 21, 1985, which operated it as the Milwaukee Road, Inc., until merging it into the Soo Line on January 1, 1986."
 Ron & Jack emails on August with Nellie; text of link above is extracted here below (from an email 2003-10-03)
From: Jack Truher <truher@earthlink.net >
Subject: Truher family history; 1870s onward

====================================================


notes from Ron Haack: In early August, 1999, I visited Austin, Minnesota. I went to the Church of Saint Augustine where I met Father Nelson. He researched the marriage records of 1902 and confirmed the marriage date of April 15, 1902 for Augustus and Helen Truher. I then visited the Mower County Courthouse in Austin, where I found the location of the land and future home of Augustus and Helen, at the current address of 911 2nd Avenue, N.E., Austin, Minnesota. I have photos of the church and of the house.

From John Burke Truher of Los Altos, California, July 4, 2001: "I checked with my brother Jim. August and Nellie lived in a fine, very tall Victorian, 3.5 story house on Queen Anne Hill from about 1940-45. That house is where the photos were taken that I sent you of my brother Jim and I being read a story on the floor while Nellie read seated on a stool above us. I was nearly four years old and Jim nearly 8.

From about 1935-1940, August and Nellie lived at a smaller 2 story property within steps of a tiny house my dad built on August's property including the tiny house at 3115 South 135 Street, Riverton Heights in 1937. August owned about 5 acres there, then only had his house and the little one my dad built for us. The little house was sold about 1945, and probably the larger house about the same time. This Riverton Heights location is now in the flight path, very near, and just north of the main Seattle-Tacoma Airport. The little house is still there. I suspect that August and Nellie's Riverton Heights house. Jim Jr. reports that the Queen Ann Hill house has been replaced by an apartment complex. Jim has seen, within the last couple of years, the tiny house where he and I lived, in Riverton Heights.

I don't have records or knowledge of August and Nellie's residence after about 1945. Somewhere in Seattle until Nellie died; then August moved briefly to Altadena and then to Hawaii where he died with his oldest daughter."


==========================================


August Truher was a railroad conductor for many years. One of his trains was in an accident of record:

From an ICC accident report:

"Milwaukee Road Employees Involved in ICC Reportable Accidents, 1911-1940

NAME JOB TITLE LOCATION RR DIVISION DATE ICC REPORT ACCIDENT COMMENTS


Truher Conductor Ranier, Washington Not Stated Jul. 3, 1913 278 Derailment"


==================================================================


From notes on Gottlieb Truher:

The early records of St. Lucas Lutheran Church in Bay View, Wisconsin (era about 1875) show Gottlieb Truher's last name spelled "Truhr, no "e"". Caroline Truher's maiden name is spelled "Pein', several places.


Time line For Gottlieb & Caroline Truher:


November 21, 1832: Born, Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland.

1859: Married, Danzig, Prussia.

July 08, 1870: Immigrated to USA via NYC, with August as infant (? - actually born in 1866 in Prussia). Caroline was pregnant with Charles Edward.

(From Filbey's "Germans to America", Volume 224, 1870:

From Germany to USA, Gottlieb Trur, age 38, Male, Farmer, Caroline Trur, age 32, Female, August Trur, age .11(eleven months, actually born in Prussia in 1866). Ship: Western Metropolis, from Swinemunde, Kiel and Christiansand to New York, arrived 08 July, 1870

edot from Jack Truher, Feb, 2000: "Now this begins to make sense. Of the three cities you list, two have somewhat different name adaptations. But this definitely begins to support the greater Berlin residency of the Trur family.

We can assume that the Filbey's entry probably means that the ship, Western Metropolis, began it's Western trip from Danzig. But it picked up the Trur family in Swineoujcscie (current Polish name for Swinemunde). Swineoujcscie is a shipping port, on the Baltic coast just at the border between Germany and modern Poland, about 50 miles north of Berlin. Then the ship traveled West to pick up additional passengers at Kiel, a major German port city on the Kiel Bay. In order to get out the Baltic Sea into the Atlantic, the ship must then travel north and then west. On the Southeast coast of Norway, the ship would have conveniently passed Kristiansand, another port where passengers boarded. Then on to New York.

The Danzig connection is: the ship's log would show that its journey began there. That association could be preserved in association with all passengers of that ship. I forget now how many sources have told us that Danzig was the Truher emigration point. I think there were other independent references of Danzig, but I can't name any of them, except the report I got from a German.")


August 11, 1870: Charles Edward was born in Wisconsin, probably Bay View. No Baptism record available as of 1999. Date verified per Confirmation Record at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

August 1872: Brother Jakob emigrates from Danzig, Prussia via Baltimore, Maryland and arrives in Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin sometime later to join Gottlieb.

Note: A picture was discovered in January of 2001 of the brothers Jakob and Gottlieb. The date is unknown, and could have been in the early 1870's in America, or in Germany before they emigrated.

January 22, 1873: Matheldie Helene (Aunt Till) born, Bay View, Wisconsin.

July 7, 1874: Herman Adolph and Julius Albert born, Bay View, Wisconsin.

July 21, 1874: Herman Adolph and Julius Albert die, Bay View, Wisconsin.

November 29, 1875: Gottlieb buys house on 156 Lenox Avenue, Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin (now 2370 and 2372 Lenox Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, 2 houses).

January 14, 1876: Auguste (Gussie) Amelia born, Bay View, Wisconsin.

June 1876: Gottlieb's last recorded communion at St. Lucas Church, Bay View, Wisconsin.

Mid 1876 - Mid 1885: Reconstruction, best guess: Gottlieb and Caroline and family went to Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota sometime after mid 1876. Note: Caroline Lietzau married Gustave Pinske on June 11, 1876 in McLeod County Minnesota. On January 7, 1879, Caroline Pein Truher was a Godparent to their son Theodore Hermann at his baptism in Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

The Truher family eventually migrated to Fossum Township, Polk County, Minnesota by 1880 (Federal Census) where they were shown as living either next door or on the same farm as Gustave and Caroline Pinske. The four children were also there, but Mother Florentine was NOT listed. (This part of Polk County became part of the new Norman County in 1881. Fossum Township is on the eastern border of Norman County, with Wild Rice Township adjacent and to the West).

Between 1880 and 1885, the family moved to Wild Rice Township, Norman County, Minnesota, where they staked and worked their farm. The 1885 special Minnesota State Census shows them in Wild Rice Township, Norman County, Minnesota, again either with the Gustave and Caroline Pinske family, or next door to it (see "Ron Haack", below). Just a short distance away was the Ernest and Johanna Pinske family farm. Again, the four Truher children (August, Charles, Matilde and Augusta are listed, but now Gottlieb's mother Florentine Truher is listed, age 79 and born in Germany.

June 4, 1885: Gottlieb and Caroline Truher sold his house at 156 Lenox Avenue, Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin to brother Jakob Truher for $700. Gottlieb and Caroline are listed as from the town of Wild Rice, Norman County, and Minnesota.

December 24, 1885: United States grants Gottlieb and Caroline their land in Norman County, Minnesota.

June 4, 1886: Gottlieb and Caroline get mortgage on above land from Hiram Upton.

1886: Some major catastrophic event descends upon the Truher family. See the notes on son August Louis Truher where he tells a story of death (?) and his mother Caroline coming down with typhoic fever, rendering her helpless and August forced to learn to cook, etc. Whatever the event, it caused the next several steps in the eventual migration of the Truher's to Minneapolis.

Note: In August of 2000, a Hennepin County Minnesota Probate Court document from the year 1900 was discovered which tells of the commitment of Gottlieb to the State Hospital for the Insane at St. Peter, Minnesota. Details below; however, it speaks of a lawsuit "with his brother" about the 1885 time period. Gottlieb never recovered from that episode. At this writing, there are no details about this lawsuit. During May and June of 2001, Ron Haack wrote letters to the Norman County Minnesota Clerk of Courts, and the Milwaukee County Historical Society (Wisconsin), asking for any information on such a law suit. In both cases, there is NO record of such a lawsuit, either for a Truher/Trur/Truhr as plaintiff or defendants.

September, 27,1886: Gottlieb and Caroline buy 525 Franklin, Hutchinson, and McLeod County, Minnesota. They are listed as from Hennepin County, Minnesota.

December 18, 1886: Gottlieb and Caroline assign land in Norman County, Minnesota to Phelps and Calkins, attorneys for Mr. Upton.

April 17, 1887: Son Charles Edward Truher confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

October 1888: Daughter Mathilda Truher confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

April 5, 1891: Daughter Auguste Amalie confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

April 11, 1891: Norman County, Minnesota sheriff forecloses Gottlieb and Caroline's Norman County land. They still owe $855.35 and they missed a $48 interest payment.

1891/1892: The Minneapolis City Directory lists August Truer, brakeman, as living at 313 10th Avenue North. No mention of the rest of the family.

1892/1893: The Minneapolis City Directory lists at 2932 18th Avenue South: August L. Truer, brakeman, Charles E., brakeman, Gottlieb, Susan (? -Augusta??), folder, Mpls Envelope Co., and Tillie, folder, Mpls. Envelope Co. The family had moved to Minneapolis. Minors and non-working women were not listed in city directories, thus the absence of Caroline.

Note: There is confusion about two addresses, 2930 and 2932 18th Avenue South. 2932 18th Avenue South MAY have become 2930 18th Avenue South by 1900. A Sanborn fire map of 1906 shows the house as 2932, THREE lots north of the east-west alley, just where 2930 stands today. Another possibility is that 2930 and 2932 are really the same house, just downstairs and upstairs. After 1900, 2932 is never mentioned again.

1893/1894: The Minneapolis City Directory now shows at 2932 18th Avenue South: August Truher, conductor, Charles E., brakeman and Gottlieb, but not the women.

November 7, 1894: Gottlieb and Caroline sell 525 Franklin, Hutchinson, and McLeod County, Minnesota.

1894/1895: The Minneapolis City Directory now shows at 2932 18th Avenue South: August Truher, Augusta, seamstress, Charles, brakeman, Gottlieb and Matilda, sewer.

June 1895: The special 1895 Minnesota State Census shows the following: At 2932 18th Avenue South (first floor assumed): Gottlieb Truher, age 65, Caroline, age 56, August, age 28, brakeman, Charles, age 24, brakeman and Gussie, age 19, seamstress.

At 2932 (2nd floor): William F. Frank, age 24, born in New York, Electrician and Matilda Frank, age 22 (Tillie Truher got married 1n 1893)!

At 2930 18th Avenue South (one house north of 2932, no longer there, or see Note above): Albert Frank, age 25, born in Minnesota, Expressman, Ida, age 28, born in Illinois and Sydney Frank, age 2, born in Minnesota (wife and son). It is assumed that Albert was William Franks's brother - verification is needed.

June 16, 1896: Auguste Amelia Truher (daughter) marries William Carl Haack in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, and Minnesota. They will live at 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis, the home of Louis and Amelia Zadach (brother-in-law and sister of William). Louis' father Friederick Wilhelm Gotthilf Zadach and stepmother Florentine (Florence) lived next door at 3032 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis.

November 4, 1896: Son August L. Truher buys 2930 18th Avenue South (old 2932, see above), Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota for $2100 cash plus an assumed mortgage of $1500. (Note: same house only sold for about twice that amount in 1954). This was a 2 family duplex.

January 1, 1898: Grandson Herbert William Haack is born at 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis.

Note: A picture was discovered in January of 2001 of Gottlieb and Caroline Truher with their daughter Augusta Truher Haack and their grandson Herbert William Haack. It is believed that the photo was made sometime in the summer of 1898. There is the possibility that the picture was taken in 1900 at 2930 18th Avenue South, and that the baby was their granddaughter, Delilah H. Haack.

November 27, 1899: Granddaughter Delilah Henrietta Haack is born at 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis.

May 17, 1900: William Carl and Auguste Amelia Haack and their children Herbert William and Delilah Henrietta move into one part of the duplex at 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis.

June 6, 1900: The 1900 Federal Census lists at 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minnesota: William C.Haack, born Nov 1873, cooper, Augusta A. Haack, born Jan, 1875, wife, Herbert, son, born Jan 1898, Delilah Haack, daughter, born Nov. 1899, Gottlieb Truher, born Nov 1831, married 36 years, immigrated 1871, 29 years in USA, not naturalized, retired, Caroline Truher (wife), born Aug 1837, mother of 9 children, 4 still living, August Truher, born Aug 1866 in Germany, not naturalized, railroad conductor. No Charles Edward! Also, William and Matilda Truher Frank had moved.


November 27, 1900: There is a commitment hearing in Minneapolis, and Gottlieb Truher is committed to the Minnesota State Hospital for the Insane at St. Peter. From the Certificate of Jury:

Gottlieb was not a member of a Church.

When were the first symptoms of this attack manifested, and in what way? Answer: Spring of 1886 after a law suit with brother, study and unusual interpretation of the Bible, excitable, etc.

Is the disease variable, ....? Answer: Yes. Variable in his moods and for a day or two seems rational. The predominant ideas recur at short intervals.
On what subject, or in what way is derangement now manifested? (State fully): Answer: Religiosity. Claims infidelity of wife and children. Outbursts of rage and temper towards family quotes Bible as his authority. The Bible tells him that he is to kill his wife and that the time is (to be ?) appointed.

Has the patient sown any disposition to injure others? Answer: Except (?) by frequent threats and claims that the time is coming when all should die.

What is supposed to be the cause of the disease? Answer: Worry over lawsuits in 1886.

The patient said (here state what the patient said to either or both examiners): Talked of his suspicions regarding his wife and family and his religious impressions(?). Excitable, talks loudly and boistrously.

Other facts: Suspicious of neighbors and threats of (?) violence. Is at times vulgar. Has frequently struck (?) his wife (?) insulted her.

Gottlieb was admitted to the State Hospital on November 27, 1900 and was discharged on July 29, 1901. There is no further mention of his mental problems, and no family stories about this episode.



March 10, 1902: August L. Truher (single) sells 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis, to William Carl Haack (and wife Gussie, August's sister) for $1500 plus a mortgage assumption.

April 15, 1902: August converts to Roman Catholicism, changes his first name to Augustus and marries Helen Mary Nellie Barrett in the Church of St. Augustine, Austin, Mower County, Minnesota. He moves to Austin. It can only be imagined the profound affect on Caroline Pein Truher, his mother, who was a staunch Prussian Lutheran and sent August to only the best of Lutheran schools.

June 13, 1902: Grandson Harold Carl Haack is born at 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

December 5, 1904: Gottlieb dies in Minneapolis and was buried in Pioneer Cemetery, Cedar Avenue and Lake Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was exhumed in 1919 and re- buried in the new Haack/Truher plot in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota. (The Milwaukee Railroad appropriated part of Pioneer Cemetery in 1919).

July 24, 1912: Grandson Harold Carl Haack killed by streetcar on Lake Street in Minneapolis, Minnesota and was buried in Pioneer Cemetery, Cedar Avenue and Lake Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was exhumed in 1919 and re-buried along with Gottlieb Truher in the new Haack/Truher plot in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

December 12, 1928: Caroline dies at 2921 18th Avenue South, the home of her daughter Matilda Truher Frank and her husband William L. (across the street and a few doors north of Gussie Truher Haack's home where Caroline had lived for many years). She is buried next to Gottlieb and Grandson Harold Carl Haack in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis.


Ron Haack: On Wednesday afternoon, August 18, 1999, I met Ramona Weaver as she pulled into the Kraft Farm in Wild Rice Township, Norman County, and Minnesota. This is former farm of Gottlieb Truher in the 1880's. Ramona is the daughter of Mrs. Kraft, who died last year. We talked for over an hour. She showed me the Norman County History book with articles on the Pinske family (Ferdinand, Ernest, etc.). The front half of the current house may be original to the Truher era (no proof). I took three photos, two of the house and outbuildings, and one of Ramona. The current address of the farm is Ramona Weaver, 2162 390th Street, Gary, MN 56545.

Ramona showed me the burial site just South and adjacent of the Kraft-Truher farm, on the current Pinske farm, with a monument to Ernest Pinske and historical markers. Because of poor lighting conditions, I returned the next day and took some photos. Ramona gave me a name of Ervine Pinske, man with one arm, living just north of Trinity Lutheran Church in Twin Valley. I failed to connect with Ervine.

There is a little Lutheran Church on Minnesota 200, about one mile East of the Truher homestead; however, Ramona said it started in 1919 and then folded. Records were transferred to Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Manhomen, Minnesota.

The Norman County Recorder's office in Ada stated that Norman County split from Polk County in 1881, which explains the census of 1880 and 1885 differences. There is no record of land purchased by Gottlieb Truher in the Polk County Recorder Office in Crookston, Minnesota. It looks like he staked out the land, homesteaded it and got his land grant later.

When comparing the current Wild Rice and Fossum Township maps side by side, the current Truher farm (the Kraft farm) is in the northeast corner of Wild Rice Township, second section in from the East. Wild Rice Township's northern border is Minnesota Highway 200. The north-south frontal road past the Truher-Kraft farm is Norman County 41 (two miles West of the Wild Rice - Fossum townships border. On Minnesota 200, about four miles East of the Truher-Kraft farm and in Fossum Township lies another Pinske farm. It just may be that the 1880 Federal Census showing the Truher and Pinske clans in Fossum Township, Polk County, is no fluke! Then, again, the 1880 Census Taker may have erred, and the Truher and Pinske farms were ALWAYS in Wild Rice Township. We may never know for sure.





newpaper article text:

Caroline Pein Truher Genealogical Report:



Caroline Pein Truher's obituary from the Minneapolis newpapers, December, 1928:

"Services Saturday For Mrs. Truher"


"Funeral services for Mrs. Caroline Truher, 90 years old, cousin of General Von Kluck, wartime marshal of the German Imperial army, will be conducted Saturday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Willam Frank, 2921 Eighteenth avenue S., at 2 p.m.


"Mrs. Truher was born in Germany in 1838 and came to this country 58 years ago. She moved to Minneapolis 37 years ago. She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Frank and Mrs. William haack of Minneapolis; two sons, C. E. F(T)ruher, Dubuque, Iowa, and A. L. F(T)ruher of Seattle; 10 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.


"Further services will be conducted at the Anderson chapel, 1117 East Lake street at 2:30 p.m.. Burial will take place in Lakewood cemetery."


 on August's Seattle residences; from Jack Truher on July 4, 2001:
 more on August's railroad years
 August's railroad career, Milwaukee Road railroad
 Helen Truher recalls: pg A-4 Continued -

JIM TRUHER'S (JWT1) FAMILY

Father (Your grandfather Truher) August Louis Truher was born August 5, 1866 in Dantzig, Germany. An old map I have puts Dantzig in "East Prussia". Anyhow, the Truhers and Paines were Prussians and militarists. August was brought to the U.S. by his parents when he was six years old because his mother was determined to get her sons out of the soldier business. During World War I when August had a relative who was a German general, he wouldn't let his children admit their German extraction. When he grew up, August went to work for the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul railroad. After he married Nellie Barrett and they had 3 children, the family moved from town to town as the railroad was constructed westward. The western terminal was Tacoma, Washington, and they lived there several years before moving to Seattle. When your father was about 11 during WW-I they moved to a small farm in Kent, Washington, He worked as a conductor until he retired at the age of 72. He lived to be 81 and died in Hawaii at the home of his eldest daughter, Helen Alderman. He is buried at Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City next to your Grandmother Truher.

Mother (Your Grandmother Truher) Helen Mary Barrett (called Nellie) was born in Austin Minnesota on May 14, 1876. She had a brother and about 4 sisters. When she was quite young (about 18, I guess) she took a job as a teacher in a one-room country school near Austin. There was very little pay, and she "boarded around" with the families of her students. Apparently, they had a schedule so she would stay in all the homes by the time the year was over.

A-5

Jim Truher's family - continued

I don't know how long she taught school, but she said some of her pupils were taller than she was. Then she took a job as a reporter on the Austin paper. We have a copy of the articles which appeared in that paper at the time of her marriage to August Truher. At that time she was 25 and he was 35. The couple had 5 children--Helen, Louis, James, and the twins--Mary and May. She died in Seattle, Washington in 1945 and is buried in Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City.

Grandfather Truher (your great grandfather) Gottleib Truher was born and died in Germany, presumably in "East Prussia", but I don't really know about that.

Grandmother Truher (your great grandmother) Caroline Paine Truher came from an interesting family. Her sister was an opera singer of some note, according to Helen Alderman (who sang on the radio in Honolulu in her youth). And one of her relatives was General Von Kluk whose name is in the history books as one of the most prominent generals in the German army during World War I. I have heard that he was a half brother of Caroline Paine, also that he was a cousin, and I don't know the exact relationship, nor does Helen Alderman. Anyhow, the story is that Caroline hated all the militarism in her family and in the whole Prussian culture and prevailed upon her husband to emigrate to the United States. I have a note that her father's name was Ludwiq Paine, and her mother's name was Rose.
 following written by Helen Alderman in April, 1980 (this line is an edit by Jack Truher)

"There is some mix-up about when our grandfather lived in Minneapolis--also as to when he died. My father (Augustus L. Truher) told me that his father (Gottlieb) died on their wheat farm in Minnesota when Augustus was 15 or 16 years old. He worked on the farm with his father. His brother, Charles, was still too young. After Gottlieb died, father tried to continue to do the farm work with hired help and the guidance of his mother.

"About a year later his mother had typhoic fever and nearly died. It was several months before she could do anything and the girls were too young to help. Father had to give up the farm work and from his mother's (Caroline Paine) instructions from her bed, he learned to cook. He told me his father had taught him how to butcher, but his mother taught him how to make bread and cookies and cakes and how to can vegetables, smoke meats, make saurkraut, sausage, etc.

"When he was about 18 or 20 he knew he did not want to continue the farming, so they sold the farm and moved to Minneapolis. I understood that his brother Charles was born before they acquired the farm, but that his sisters had been born on the farm. Perhaps the farm was near Hutchinson, Minn. don't know for sure, Perhaps they shared the ownership with others, hut I never understood it that way. It was always what he and his mother decided. The farm was about 300 acres from what he told me--mostly wheat. He said they had good equipment and livestock--horses, a few cows and some chickens. He told me he hated it.

"He told me he loved the sound of the trains and decided that he was going to be a railroad man. That must have been when he was about 20. He was 25 when he and Mother were married. She met him when she was a reporter for the Austin Daily Herald. It was owned by Gertrude and John Skinner. She was 25 years old and used to interview the interesting visitors to Austin, so went to the deport (edit, "depot") to check the incoming people. Austin was the southern end of the line with a "lay-over" there. The train left the next morning for Minneapolis (What better timing for romance?). So he had been a railroad man for nearly 15 years before he and Mother were married. He still owned and lived in the house in Minneapolis--in which hiw (edit, "his") mother and sister (Aunt Gussie) lived. When he and Mother decided to live in Austin, he sold the house to Gussie Haack and her husband. That was in 1902 when he and Mother were married. They lived in a small house in Austin next door to a lot he had purchased on Main Street. They built a nice house on it where I was born in 1903, Louis in 1904, James in 1907.

"Father told me that his mother saw to it that he went to school (Lutheran church schools) and insisted on his speaking "high German". She had been well educated in Prussia and made him study when he was a boy. He did speak beautiful German when I could coax him to help me. (Note During WW-I, he wouldn't let the children admit their German heritage at all.)

Page 2, Helen Alderman's letter

"When I was about 18 I went to Minnesota to visit my mother's sister (Aunt Mary Ferguson) and while I was in Minneapolis I went to see my grandmother Truher. I had been studying German and could speak it a little. (Note: I believe this was the first and only time any of Augustus' children met their grandmother). Grandmother (Caroline Truher -ed.,jbt) had been sick and her hair had been cut short to make it easy to wash. She was in her eighties and was as spry as could be. She ran upstairs to get her comb and brush to show me how easily she could do it. She died in December, 1928, the day I left Seattle to take the ship to Hawaii. She was 90 years old. (Note: James was attending USC at that time.)

"One other thing I remember that Father told me was that he had a cousin named August who was called "Auggie" and that he (Father) was always so glad that his name was Augustus so he could be called Gus. He said it sounded more manly. Did you know that Mother never called him Gus? She told me one time when I asked, that she called him Mr. Truher for quite a while, later called him "dear", and then after I was born he was called Father or Papa from then on.

"Father has written in our family bible that he was born Augustus Louis Truher. He was a baptized Lutheran and then baptized a Catholic before he and mother married."

Edit by Ron Haack: In early August, 1999, I visited Austin, Minnesota. I went to the Church of Saint Augustine where I met Father Nelson. He researched the marriage records of 1902 and confirmed the marriage date of April 15, 1902 for Augustus and Helen Truher. I then visited the Mower County Courthouse in Austin, where I found the location of the land and future home of Augustus and Helen, at the current address of 911 2nd Avenue, N.E., Austin, Minnesota. I have photos of the church and of the house.
• Monday, June 20, 2005
• Nellie Truher w JWT1+Helen: Jim-Jack-Michael
• Subject: Nellie Barrett Truher, April 1940

To:
jim@truher.com , michael@truher.com , Haack_Ronald
From: Jack Truher <
jbt@truher.net >

Brother Michael saw a photo of his grandmother Truher while on his and Sherryl's RV trip, staying overnight with us in Los Altos about a week ago. Because his middle name is Barrett, I scanned this picture for him. I was reminded of my mother's text album, elsewhere included in the my/our <
http://gene.truher.net/TBF.ntweb/ >family online notebook. The picture is of Nellie Barrett Truher , my grandmother.

The picture is a part of photo album, HBT-PA-02, not yet included in this Notebook. Surrounding pictures on the same album page indicate the picture was taken on the Riverton Heights property in April 1940. Lots of room for development. Jack was about two years old. The baby being held in this picture is Claire Louise Truher, daughter of Lewis (my father's brother) and Clara.

Reading again my mother's text album for JWT2, I find mother's (Helen's) recounting of her husband's beginning construction on their first owned home on the corner property given them by grandfather August. Open this story below:
 FEBRUARY through JUNE 1937
3115 So. 135th Street.,
Riverton Heights, Seattle
[ Jim2: 2 yr + 2-6 months old ]

Once in a while Seattle has snow and ice for a week or two. It happened that early in February, 1937, the ground was frozen, then covered with about 8 inches of snow, which stayed on the ground more than a week. But that didn't stop your Dad. He started preparing the ground [for the new house] right away.

He cleared off all the snow where the house was to stand and made a path through the snow from Truher's big house to the new site. We got you dressed in your warm red suit (see previous picture) and you trudged back and forth following him around for an hour or two every day. He had to carry boiling water in a teakettle from Truher's in order to level the ground where the foundation posts were to stand. But in a month or two he had built a little house, which included a living room, a tiny bedroom just large enough for a double bed and your crib, a
bathroom, a kitchen and a back porch with a brand new washing machine. (The underlined words illustrate the importance of the new conveniences, which delighted me and kept you neat and clean.)

Of course the three of us moved in before the house was finished. A few years later we added a larger living room and used the old one as a bedroom. That was because we had Jack and needed more room. It was wonderful to have our own house. You had a big yard to play in and loving grandparents to fuss over you as well as parents, of course.


 I gather a new understanding of place and time from this. While my parents family moved around a lot in my life, their little house in Riverton Heights was built initially - before I was born, and was a place to which they could return. This little house was begun in the winter and Spring of 1937, and improved later in that year, adding just enough room for my arrival in February 1938. More below:
 Jim2 and I moved with our parents to various other places, Scenic most memorably, but the little house, acquired on the corner of our grandparents acreage in Riverton Heights was a place of refuge. In one of her writings my mother, Helen, writes of "not being uncomfortable" living with August and Nellie.

The lesson to me this morning is to put to rest my perception that our parents were desperately poor in this era. They had choices which they were exercising. Money was tight, but they were managing adequately. Family tensions were as much a factor in exercising moving options as was the bottom line.

Helen Nelson told me that the primary tension between Helen Burke Truher and Nellie Barrett Truher had to do with Helen's plans to take a part-time job to augment the family income and otherwise get her out of the confinement of child-rearing two toddlers. Nellie and August were contrary to women's liberation, however defined, and Helen was not. I have the impression that Nellie and August were not interested in helping with child care. What other topics of controversy were at issue was never clear to me. I remember August as laconic and grumpy. When he died, he left zero inheritance to my father - a matter of considerable resentment at the time.

My father appeared to be very attached to his mother, as evidenced by his giving Michael her maiden surname. Nellie in the picture was never consultive with her adult son to my knowledge. There was not much exchange of happy conversation. But I was so young. How could I know. My parents were so driven during my youth.

I am reminded again of my mother's observation when my own children were quite young: "Jack, you will not make the same mistakes I did. You will make different mistakes."
• Monday, May 16, 2005
• HBT Text Album HBTxt Jim2 1934- ...Txt in OCR prep
 HBT text album in progress. Mother wrote an elaborate record for each of her sons on her experience as a mother. The first of these, for Jim Jr., about a third has been scanned so far. This result can be found at:

http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/TA/HBTxt-JWT2.doc in MSword format

http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/TA/HBTxt-JWT2.pdf in Adobe Reader format
• Monday, May 9, 2005
• HBT Text Album HBTxt Jim2 1934- ...Txt in OCR prep
 Clarification, 2005m0508. Mother's text album 1 mentions Walula as one of our temporary homes. Did we live in Wallula or Walla Walla? Now I’m really confused as to where we lived! It appears that there is the American Indian people, town, county & river named “Walla Walla” as well as a Wallula Junction some 30 miles west on the Walla Walla river, all in Walla Walla County.

click at left bullet for more from Jim2, below:
• http://llinkwww.ci.walla-walla.wa.us/ says
Incorporated in 1862, a Mayor and six Council members govern the City of Walla Walla.”

http://hometown.aol.com/Gibson0817/wallula.htm  says
“The name Wallula originates from a Walla Walla Indian word meaning "place of many waters."”

http://www.umatilla.nsn.us/index.html  says
Our three bands were brought together on the Umatilla Indian Reservation, established by a Treaty with the US Government in 1855. We were united as a single tribal government in 1949 when our leaders adopted our Constitution and By-laws.
We currently have over 2,446 tribal members. We are a small group of people who continue to care for and live on the land of our ancestors. We are a small group of people who are doing great things for ourselves and our neighbors...

http://www.wwbwc.org/Main_Pages/Projects/Flows/Flows.htm
as you can see the Walla Walla river isn’t much of a river and apparently has been the subject of some disagreement among the folks living in WA and OR.



Primary Data Source: <
http://www.census.gov >
Census 2000     <http://www.HomeTownLocator.com/CensusGlossary.cfm >Census Glossary
* Density per square mile of land area.
Wallula, Washington http://www.HomeTownLocator.com/CountyDetail.cfm?SCFIPS=53071
Walla Walla County)

Population: 
197
Land Area: 
0.10 miles2
Housing Units: 
64
Water Area: 
0.00 miles2
CDP: 
http://www.HomeTownLocator.com/CityCensusData.cfm?StateFIPS=53&PlaceFIPS=75985
Census Data

Total Area: 
0.10 miles2
County: 
<http://www.HomeTownLocator.com/CountyCensusData.cfm?SCFIPS=53071 >Census Data
Population Density: 
1,978.53*
State: 
<
http://www.HomeTownLocator.com/statecensusdata.cfm?StateFIPS=53&State=Washington >Census Data
Housing Density: 
642.77*


Primary Data Source: <
http://www.census.gov >Census 2000   <http://www.HomeTownLocator.com/CensusGlossary.cfm >Census Glossary
* Density per square mile of land area.
Walla Walla County, Washington (<http://www.HomeTownLocator.com/CountySubs2K.cfm?SCFIPS=53071 >5 Subdivisions)
Population: 
55,180
Land Area: 
1,270.51 miles2
Housing Units: 
21,147
Water Area: 
28.74 miles2
County: 
<http://www.HomeTownLocator.com/CountyCensusData.cfm?SCFIPS=53071 >Census Data
Total Area: 
1,299.25 miles2
State: 
<
http://www.HomeTownLocator.com/StateCensusData.cfm?StateFIPS=53&State=Washington >Census Data
Population Density: 
43.43 *


Housing Density: 
16.64 *
• Saturday, May 7, 2005
• 2005m0507 Nth cousin define √
 1b. EDITOR's VIRTUAL DESK. Removing Cousins -- Gently
A reader recently wrote about finding a cousin with whom he shares a
3-great-grandfather but not the 2-great-grandfather. He wanted to know
"how times removed are we?"

The answer is you are not removed at all. The genealogical term "removed"
means that a person belongs to a different kinship generation.

In this instance the reader and his new cousin are 4th cousins. Their mutual
ancestors are the reader's 3-great-grandparents, which means their
2-great-grandparents were siblings; their great-grandparents were 1st
cousins;
their grandparents were 2nd cousins, and their respective parents were
3rd cousins.

However, the "removed" part enters the picture if you want to compare
what YOUR children are to this new 4th cousin. They would be HIS
4th cousins once removed (because they are one generation removed from this
kinship (4th cousins). Such a relationship is recorded as 4C1R.

You will find links to some relationship charts in RootsWeb's Guide to
Tracing Family Trees:

http://rwguide.rootsweb.com/lesson1.htm
• Nth cousin defined. So you think you might be a 3rd cousin, twice removed. What does that mean?

I saved some text about that:

from RootsWeb Review, 3 December 2003, Vol. 6, No. 49 email
see here below:
• Thursday, April 14, 2005
• Thomas and Catherine Burke , a compilation by Jack Truher √
• On Thomas and Catherine Burke , a compilation by Jack Truher copied here, with links, here below:
• These are some additional records Jack Truher received on August 16, 2003 from Marylou Burke, widow of Joe Burke, nephew of Jack’s (JBT) mother, Helen Burke Truher ( descendent of Thomas and Catherine Burke ). Helen Burke Truher was daughter of Thomas and Catherine Burke's son, James (1864-1924). Mrs. Marylou Burke is currently of Tucson, Arizona.

Image of Thomas Burke
gravestone in Richland Center graveyard. This picture includes marker of Thomas Burke as Mexican War veteran as appears at his gravesite.

page 1, prepared date October 11, 1858. “
To the Judge of the Tippacanoe Circuit Court . This is application for citizenship by Thomas Burk, dated October 11, 1958 at which date Thomas was 27 years old. Thomas was born in Ireland, County Tippirary, emigrated from Liverpool in the year 1842. He arrived in Baltimore, Maryland on September 29, 1842. We know from other documents in this group that Thomas served for a few weeks in the Mexican American War of ~1848.

page 2, prepared date July 8,1892. “
Mexican War Pensions, Act of January 29, 1887 ” This is an application, dated July 8, 1892, for Mexican War widow’s pension. Thomas Burk had died on April 2, 1883. We observe that the clerk spells Thomas’ wife’s name, “Catherine Bourke”, in this document and Thomas’ name, “Bourke”. Thomas and Catherine were married June 28, 1854. It appears that neither the government, nor Catherine, had any solid documentation that Thomas had actually served in the Mexican War. Catherine states that she “believes he (Thomas) served sometime over sixty days (apparently the qualifying term). She remember(s) he said he was in hospital with bloody flux (war wound assumed) for three weeks after the rest (of his military unit) were discharged.”

page 3.
- continues page 2 , prepared date July 8,1892. This page is prepared by a “clerk of the (Catherine’s local) Circuit Court, and certifies that Catherine is a “credible person and of good report for truth and veracity in the community”.

page 4, prepared July 28, 1892. This page, “
Widow’s Service Pension ” may have served to record authorization for pension fund participation, or it may be otherwise. Comment in middle of document is by government clerk, dated July 28, 1892. It stipulates that the government has “no official service (record) for Thomas, and no evidence that he had been “invalid” (ed)”, i.e. disabled. This may simply record a finding of fact, and would not necessarily have negated a widow’s participation in a pension fund. The page has an entry at bottom from Catherine’s attorney, apparently received on July 13, 1892, from the government on her application for pension.

I believe from earlier evidence that Catherine Burke did receive this modest pension, but I can not recall now the source of this impression.

-- Jack Truher August 17, 2003
This page revised 2010m0424 on Notetaker. Links are all OK fixed in text above as of 2010m0424

http://gene.truher.net/burk/dotMacBurk/BurkBourkePension.html

http://gene.truher.net/burk/dotMacBurk/Burk/BurkBourkePension1.jpg

http://gene.truher.net/burk/dotMacBurk/BurkThomas-1.jpg
http://gene.truher.net/burk/dotMacBurk/BourkeCethrene-2.jpg
http://gene.truher.net/burk/dotMacBurk/BourkeCethrene-3.jpg
http://gene.truher.net/burk/dotMacBurk/BourkeCethrene-4.jpg
http://gene.truher.net/burk/dotMacBurk/BurkeThomas_children.jpeg

additionally of interest:
http://www.mickey-cookie.whsites.com/family_tree/james_burke_descend-full.htm
• Friday, April 8, 2005
• Thomas Burke by Lori Manning √
•  Records by Lori Manning (previously Lori Berg) 05/06/00
by John Burke Truher, 05/10/00

Our web friendly
Burke genealogist , Lori Manning, provides email, reconstructed below:
 Thomas Bourke was born in 1833, immigrated to USA in 1844, was a private (age 15-19, or 16-20) in the US Army in the Mexican-American War of 1846-1849. He received a war service bounty which he applied to a homestead in Indiana. He was swindled out of it, and bought the Richland Center, Wisconsin, farm sometime between 1870 and 1873. Thomas Bourke died in 1883. Thomas also may have served in the Civil War, not sure we have hard records on that.

Catherine Stapleton Burke registered for a veteran's wife pension when she was about 60 years old. No details on particulars of award. Catherine lived until aged 75.

OFFICIAL RECORDS:

June 27, 1857 Marriage Certificate, (County Room Brewer Library, given by Helen Sanden of Edgerton, WI), Thomas Burk and Catherine Stapleton married June 27, 1857 in the state if Indiana, Tippecanoe County.

October 11, 1858 Citizenship Papers, (County Room Brewer Library, given by Helen Sanden of Edgerton, WI), "To the Judge of the Tippecanoe Circuit Court, In the State of Indiana: Thomas Burk Being an Alien, and a free white person, makes the following report of himself: upon his solemn oath declares that he is aged 27 years; that he was born in the County of Tippraray in the Kingdom of Great Britain & Ireland that he emigrated from Liverpool in the year one thousand eight hundred and forty two; that he arrived in the United States at the City of Baltimore in the State of Maryland on the 29 day of September eighteen hundred and forty two that he owes allegiance to Victoria Queen of Great Britain & Ireland and that it is bona fide his intention to become a citizen of the United States of America, and to renounce forever allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state or sovereignty whatever; and particularly to Victoria Queen as ? of whom he is a subject. Sworn to and Subscribed, Before me, on the 11 day of October A.D. 1858, William ? Ellis Clerk C.C."

July 13, 1892 Widow's Service Pension, (County Room Brewer Library, given by Helen Sandin of Edgerton, WI), Mexican War "Cathren Bourke, Dayton Twp.- Richland Co., WI, Widow of Thomas Bourke Pvt., [who] died April 2, 1883, [pension] received July 13, 1892."------

Declaration of Widow for Pension, (County Room Brewer Library, given by Helen Sandin of Edgerton, WI), Mexican War Pensions. "On this 8th day of July, A.D. 1892, personally appeared before me, clerk of the Circuit Court the same being a court of record in the State of Wisconsin, Catherine Bourke, a resident of the Township of Dayton in the county of Richland, in the State of Wisconsin who being by me first duly sworn according to law, deposes and says: I am the widow of Thomas Bourke, who served under the name of Thomas Bourke, as a Private in the war with Mexico; That my said husband enlisted at Charleston Virginia, for the term of during war; That I was married under my name of Catharine Stapleton to my said husband, by Father James Cloak on or about the 28th day of June, A.D. 1857 at Lafayette, in the State of Indiana, and lived with my said husband from the date of my said marriage until the day of his death, to wit: the Second day of April, A.D. 1883, when my said husband died at Township of Dayton, Richland Co., in the State of Wisconsin, and that I have not since remarried; That there was never any legal impediment to said marriage. Believes he served sometime over sixty days. Remember he said he was in hospital with bloody ? three weeks after the rest were discharged. That since the death of my said husband I have resided at the following places, to wit: In the same house continuously since my husband died."

Census for 1900, WI, Richland Co., Dayton Twp., E.D. 111, sheet 6, family 94, (Bourk) head, female, date of birth Mar. 1832, age 68, widow, 9 births, 6 living, born Ireland, father Ireland, mother Ireland, immigrated 1846, 54 yrs. in U.S., farmer, can read & write, own home, mortgaged, farm.

September 3, 1908 Burial Permit, (County Room Brewer Library, given by Helen Sandin of Edgerton, WI), "Town of Dayton Sept 4th 1908. A satisfactory certificate of death having been furnished to me, as required by the laws of this State, permission is hereby given for the burial of Catherine Burke who died at Dayton Township in the county of Richland on Sept 3rd 1908; the cause of death being cancer of stomach. Place of burial Richland Center.---Thompson's Richland Co. Cemeteries, St. Mary's Cemetery #211, b: 1833, d: 9-3-1908, 75yrs., "Aged 75 years."
• √ indicates revised 2010m0424 post truher.net fix
 Jack has a couple dozen pictures, some web ready, some otherwise, but they will appear here eventually. Mak ane entry here Why can I not e
• data from Helen Burke Truher √
• folder: burk e Grandmother Burke, misc photos and docs

Ancestor compilation, prepared by Helen Burke Truher about 1965
http://gene.truher.net/burk/earth/KathrynMurphyBurke/Burke_History_HBTtxtWeb.jpg

Scenic, Wash, 1938, Jack Truher's grandmother, Catherine Murphy Burke, with grandchildren Jimmie and baby Jack
http://gene.truher.net/burk/earth/KathrynMurphyBurke/HBT_PA1_16_txt_DR.jpg

Helen Truher's parents, data sheet
http://gene.truher.net/burk/earth/KathrynMurphyBurke/James_Burke_Data_Sheet_2000.jpg

Jim & Helen Truher's parents, essay by HBT (partial here)
http://gene.truher.net/burk/earth/KathrynMurphyBurke/KathrynBurke_GryBstTxt120KB.jpg

Jack with grandmother Kathryn Mary (Murphy) Burke and Jim($) in Altadena about 1943
http://gene.truher.net/burk/earth/KathrynMurphyBurke/KathrynMaryMurphyBurke_90KB.jpg
• Thursday, April 7, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA11 Jim2 1957-1985 La Canada family
 Any text recollections or augmentations which family might wish me to add to these photos will be included. Most of the photos are self-explanatory to the principals. Pages 8, 10, and 31 allow for additional resolution to aid in printing of single pictures.
• Tuesday, April 5, 2005
• JWT1+Helen, + Helen Nelson's 90th birthday testimonial
• Helen Nelson was Jack Truher's Godmother, among many other manifestations of being Helen Burke Truher's best friend. Jack prepared a 90th birthday testimonial for Helen Nelson at request of her daughter, Malinda.

same link:
http://www.truher.net/yymm/0404/HelenNelson90thWeb031502/index.html
• Sunday, April 3, 2005
• August-Nellie
• more detail on Truher family history
• Florentine Lietzau-Truher Genealogy Report (85 pages)
• Florentine Genealogy Report (85 pages) as of 2002m1001 by R.Haack
• Friday, March 25, 2005
• Jack's Army, Nike Missile experience
• About Jack's days as Battery Control Officer (BCO) for Nike Ajax anti-aircraft and Nike Hercules , nuclear-armed anti-air, anti-missile, ground-ground missiles.

In this record of my tarnished past, I am here responding to my lately found cousin, Ron, about my age, who had been a GE electronics engineer until retired.

To: Ron Haack <
cookierhh@verizon.net >

----- Original Message -----
From: <mailto:jbt@truher.net >Jack Truher
To: <mailto:cookierhh@verizon.net >Ron Haack
Sent: Friday, March 25, 2005 6:11 PM
Subject: Re: GE toxic coolant and my Nike weekend missile days

Your hazardous materials experience, Ron, reminds me of my days as Battery Control Officer (BCO) for
Nike Ajax anti-aircraft and Nike Hercules , nuclear-armed anti-air, anti-missile, ground-ground missiles. These hundreds of sites were active only from 1954-1963, exactly my time for training and execution. The national effort was ultimately determined as unworkable, too expensive, and more provocative than disarmament. I found a web site today which includes some "alumni" email address for the sites where I serviced: SF-31, Lake Chabot / Castro Valley where I was Executive Officer; and SF-51, Milagra/Pacifica where I was Site Commanding Officer for 6-8 months as a civilian National Guard placeholder without troops while the actual battery personnel were in training in Texas. Expensive it was, and in some ways preposterous. These sites were all in line of sight with local suburban homes. The radar and control centers were exposed in unprotected trailers to coordinated enemy rifle attack that would have crippled the intended ground to air defense response.

I was called to World War III duty during the Cuban Missile Crisis, and later at a missile firing, training mission in Fort Bliss (El Paso), Texas, during the week that U.S. Pres John Kennedy was killed, November 1963.

Then I was impressed by the Berkeley Free Speech movement a year later. And the rest is history.

When I began my so-called career at SLAC, Stanford, I was immediately impressed again that the so-called management at SLAC was amateurish and incompetent by comparison to the U.S. Army whose officers of my experience, who were by comparison competent, capable, and efficient to a degree that would have made my Prussian ancestors proud.

Ajax fluids include: Missile sustainer motor: JP4 aviation fuel and; hypergolic starter fluid 1.) Aniline/furfuryl alcohol. 2.) Dimethyl-hydrazine. 3.) <http://home.sport.rr.com/nikeajax/35.htm >Red fuming nitric acid. Red fuming nitric acid was the last starter fluid used.

 Ron responds:

Date: Fri, 25 Mar 2005 19:25:04 -0500
From: Ron Haack <
cookierhh@verizon.net >
Subject: Re: GE toxic coolant and my Nike weekend missile days
To: Jack Truher <
jbt@truher.net >
X-ELNK-AV: 0

ah, yes, good old
Dimethyl-hydrazine. I used that in high school as a class demo, mixing it, I believe, with nitric acid, to show how Werner von Brown would power the moon launch. Lucky I and the class are still alive. Could have been worse, my best friend's demo was welding of railroad ties using only a drop chemical mixture - almost set the instructor on fire!! he,he, the good old days, when we thought ourselves indestructible. Thank God now for "inertia".

• Sunday, March 20, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA1 √ Jim2-Jack 1930s-1940s (pics and text)
  picture C. The house of Milo Burke in Beverly Hills. Milo had made a lot of money as founder of a specialty steel company during world war II, after this Milo put his fortune into a home portable air fan manufacturing venture which failed as a business. Milo lost the Beverly Hills home, and died without anything. (open this item for more information!)
 Jack Truher recalls visiting this home about 1948. Milo lived here with his 2nd (or 3rd?) wife, Bonita. My mother, Helen Burke Truher, often said that "Milo had various women in his life, but he was madly in love with Bonita". 

Bonita was a Greto Garbo sort of figure, quite unlike the Burkes or the Truhers, projecting an air of Hollywood glamor and makeup, and fancy things. She was also given to depression, and may have been drug dependent. She would often go incognito for months. In summer of 1958 , she lived alone, or perhaps with her two daughters by Milo, at Lake Arrowhead in a house presumably financed by Milo, which address I knew from HBT. I drove by to gawk, but did not stop. It was simple structure, not so pretentious as the Bel Air house.

The grounds were substantial, at least two acres. The property had it's own running spring coming from a hillside, spilling a few gallons per minute cool water over a three foot retainer dam. I don't recall the date of our visit, but it was not winter. It was a warm day. I recall - summer. There was nothing to do for Jack or Jim on the day of this visit but to tour the grounds. The setting was of unimaginable extravagance.

Milo had made a lot of money through work managing and then owning a small steel foundry, making small orders of special alloys, in Los Angeles region during WWII. He bought this house with that money, and put the rest into a business venture, making home ventilation fans. These were floor mounted propeller fans that were featured stores with the novelty that, when air flow was pointed from floor to ceiling of a room, a balloon would dance stably near the ceiling. This business failed; Milo lost nearly everything, and sold the house. My impression was that Milo & Bonita lived in the Bel Air house from about 1948 - 1953.

Next I heard about Milo was perhaps 1962, that he had started a small company near the Johnson Space Center, making ceramic items for NASA. Milo complained that his few employees there were also NASA workers, and they only knew very expensive ways to do things. He said, "they always wrap a ten dollar bill around every part." This little company bid and won the contract for my SLAC's high radiation environment, vacuum feed-thru electrical connectors, many of which are still in place and working fine. With no comparable manufacturers, these connectors were regarded as irreplaceable.

While I was the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, about 1963, Milo asked me (through mother) to make some contacts at LLNL for similar contract work. I told him that most of this work was classified, and I had no way to investigate the issue for him. Milo complained about the difficulty of penetrating the security shrouds.

About 1966, on a visit to Pasadena, mother told me about Milo's next little company, also making electrical connectors which used ceramic seals in a radiation environment. This was a very small operation.

Mother wrote me shortly after Milo had died during a stopover visit to her home in South Pasadena. He fell over to the floor of a heart attack. Mother was distressed that her arthritis was so advanced that she was not able to give him artificial respiration on the floor.
• Friday, February 25, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA13 √ Jim2 1953-1957 college sports
 No supporting text for PA13 as yet. Check later.
 
• album page HBT_PA13_02
• album page HBT_PA13_03
• 
 
• album page HBT_PA13_04
• album page HBT_PA13_05
 
 
• album page HBT_PA13_06
• album page HBT_PA13_07
 
• Thursday, February 24, 2005
• progress reports
• February 23, 2005 You can find four family albums online. Originally created by Helen Burke Truher, a fifth album will be on the web in 2-3 weeks. High resolution images are available on request.

PA1 In recent months, brother Jim and I have collaborated at length on contextual descriptions for one of these photo albums (PA1) - on our early childhood in Seattle (1934-1944).

PA10 focuses on Jim's childhood family, and also has some newspaper clippings on Jim's early Pac Bell career.

PA11 focuses on his adult family life with Joby and their four children. My mother was obviously delighted with her experiences with how she was able to relate to this family experience.

PA12 features some of Jim's remarkable sports success in high school football and track.

Yet to post on-line:
PA13 features Jim's continuing football and track contributions at Stanford.

The
four on-line albums , and more later, are found at

same link:
http://gene.truher.net/TBF.ntweb/

Select "HBT albums" using the right tab or from Contents, then click on the bullet points to navigate. There are further navigation instructions on the web site.

These web pages are secured for privacy by an index feature that makes them hard for outsiders to access unless they have been told of the exact URL. I can protect them further by password. I don't think its necessary.

Two albums are on Jim's sports notoriety in high school (PA12), and at Stanford (PA13). Thanks to Mary Truher Albert for allowing me access to these four albums for long enough to get them online.
• Tuesday, February 22, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA12 Jim2 1949-1952 high school sports
• HBT_PA12_08.jpg
• HBT_PA12_06.jpg
• HBT_PA12_05JrHi.jpg Jim's Eliot Jr. High graduation ceremony.
•  HBT_PA12_05B.jpg Jim's 9th grade baseball.
• HBT_PA12_04.jpg
• HBT_PA12_03.jpg
• HBT_PA12_02b.jpg
 HBT_PA12_01b.jpg
• HBT_PA12_07.jpg
• HBT_PA12_09.jpg
• HBT_PA12_11.jpg
• HBT_PA12_12.jpg
 HBT_PA12_13.jpg
• HBT_PA12_14c.jpg

From: "James Truher" <james@truher.com >
To: "'Jack Truher'" <
jack@truher.net >
Subject: Re: Blond Thunderbolt 220
Date: Fri, 18 May 2007 10:09:21 -0700


Here is my recollection of this stuff.

It was taken at Burbank High School during the Foothill League championship meet. Four different uniforms are shown in the picture
(see below). I thought it was a two day meet, with prelims on Thursday and Finals on Friday. But it looks like it was over a weekend, with Friday prelims & Monday finals. The date in the photo below appears to be Friday (4/25/52). The story, Tuesday the 29th refers to finals beingyesterday.

Two stories were published, one clipping shows no
date and the other on Tuesday, 4/29/52. It is possible that the news guys and editors were all screwed up and everything happened on Thursday and Friday, but probably not. The photo reports 23.2 for prelim & the write up 22.7 for final.  I remember the wind being about the same for both prelim and final, and one of the other kids in the final said to me just before it started something like, “with this wind, I guess we don’t have a chance.” Based times in other races for everybody, the wind probably made the straight-away 220 a full second slower than in calm conditions.

Under the picture are the words “League qualifying time”. So I’m sure it was taken during a 220 heat of which I believe there were two, and no one was running very fast, because of the wind. I remember feeling no pressure in most 220’s and doing an “over shoulder look around
with about 20 yds to go in a few of those races; that explains the relaxed posture while finishing a sprint. Al “Weary” Walton (Muir track coach) chewed me out for doing that several times and told me it, if I kept it up, I’d lose to somebody I should beat. He was right.

The two news reports differ (3 yds vs 5 yds) re the distance between 1st and 2nd
.  I think the camera greatly distorted the distance; I believe the distance between 1st and 2nd in the photo was really 5 to 8 yards at the most, and it wasn’t much different in the finals. Also two or three of the other guys in the photo were in the finals.  See: http://www.kevinwilley.com/l3_topic04.htm
 HBT_PA12_15.jpg
• HBT_PA12_16Tbolt.jpg

From: "James Truher" <james@truher.com >
To: "'Jack Truher'" <
jack@truher.net >
Subject: Re: Blond Thunderbolt 220
Date: Fri, 18 May 2007 10:09:21 -0700


Here is my recollection of this stuff.

It was taken at Burbank High School during the Foothill League championship meet. Four different uniforms are shown in the picture
(see below). I thought it was a two day meet, with prelims on Thursday and Finals on Friday. But it looks like it was over a weekend, with Friday prelims & Monday finals. The date in the photo below appears to be Friday (4/25/52). The story, Tuesday the 29th refers to finals beingyesterday.

Two stories were published, one clipping shows no
date and the other on Tuesday, 4/29/52. It is possible that the news guys and editors were all screwed up and everything happened on Thursday and Friday, but probably not. The photo reports 23.2 for prelim & the write up 22.7 for final.  I remember the wind being about the same for both prelim and final, and one of the other kids in the final said to me just before it started something like, “with this wind, I guess we don’t have a chance.” Based times in other races for everybody, the wind probably made the straight-away 220 a full second slower than in calm conditions.

Under the picture are the words “League qualifying time”. So I’m sure it was taken during a 220 heat of which I believe there were two, and no one was running very fast, because of the wind. I remember feeling no pressure in most 220’s and doing an “over shoulder look around
with about 20 yds to go in a few of those races; that explains the relaxed posture while finishing a sprint. Al “Weary” Walton (Muir track coach) chewed me out for doing that several times and told me it, if I kept it up, I’d lose to somebody I should beat. He was right.

The two news reports differ (3 yds vs 5 yds) re the distance between 1st and 2nd
.  I think the camera greatly distorted the distance; I believe the distance between 1st and 2nd in the photo was really 5 to 8 yards at the most, and it wasn’t much different in the finals. Also two or three of the other guys in the photo were in the finals.  See: http://www.kevinwilley.com/l3_topic04.htm
 HBT_PA12_17b.jpg

From: "James Truher" <james@truher.com >
To: "'Jack Truher'" <
jack@truher.net >
Subject: Re: Blond Thunderbolt 220
Date: Fri, 18 May 2007 10:09:21 -0700


Here is my recollection of this stuff.

It was taken at Burbank High School during the Foothill League championship meet. Four different uniforms are shown in the picture
(see below). I thought it was a two day meet, with prelims on Thursday and Finals on Friday. But it looks like it was over a weekend, with Friday prelims & Monday finals. The date in the photo below appears to be Friday (4/25/52). The story, Tuesday the 29th refers to finals beingyesterday.

Two stories were published, one clipping shows no
date and the other on Tuesday, 4/29/52. It is possible that the news guys and editors were all screwed up and everything happened on Thursday and Friday, but probably not. The photo reports 23.2 for prelim & the write up 22.7 for final.  I remember the wind being about the same for both prelim and final, and one of the other kids in the final said to me just before it started something like, “with this wind, I guess we don’t have a chance.” Based times in other races for everybody, the wind probably made the straight-away 220 a full second slower than in calm conditions.

Under the picture are the words “League qualifying time”. So I’m sure it was taken during a 220 heat of which I believe there were two, and no one was running very fast, because of the wind. I remember feeling no pressure in most 220’s and doing an “over shoulder look around
with about 20 yds to go in a few of those races; that explains the relaxed posture while finishing a sprint. Al “Weary” Walton (Muir track coach) chewed me out for doing that several times and told me it, if I kept it up, I’d lose to somebody I should beat. He was right.

The two news reports differ (3 yds vs 5 yds) re the distance between 1st and 2nd
.  I think the camera greatly distorted the distance; I believe the distance between 1st and 2nd in the photo was really 5 to 8 yards at the most, and it wasn’t much different in the finals. Also two or three of the other guys in the photo were in the finals.  See: http://www.kevinwilley.com/l3_topic04.htm
• HBT_PA12_10.jpg
 album page HBT_PA12_01
• album page HBT_PA12_03
• album page HBT_PA12_04
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• album page HBT_PA12_06
• album page HBT_PA12_07
• album page HBT_PA12_09
• album page HBT_PA12_10
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• album page HBT_PA12_17
• album page HBT_PA12_02
• album page HBT_PA12_08
 About these pages: Any line without a link on this page may have multiple links. Click on the (+) bullet on such page to find these multiple links. Not much supporting text here.
• Saturday, February 19, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA11 Jim2 1957-1985 La Canada family
  Photo gallery on west wall of Jim & Helen Truher home in South Pasadena. These pictures were stable for many years. Perhaps Jack will return in a later revision to identify the various memories which Helen enjoyed for so long.
• Thursday, February 17, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA1 √ Jim2-Jack 1930s-1940s (pics and text)
  picture F2. Helen Burke Truher left us a record of this early period, which I have converted to text with OCR (optical character recognition). Here are the first three pages of her HBTxt_JWT2 (where *** indicates page separation of original).

======================================================
James Wilder Truher Jr. - as remembered by his mother ~ 1980

July 4, 1934 through December 10, 1934 - THE MOUNTAIN CABIN

You, and I arrived by train to meet your father at Berne, Washington, where your father had spent three days building a little house (a shack really) of three rooms. He was employed by Coyle Construction Company as a superintendent of highway construction. There was no place for me to live (with you) so he built this little place of three tiny rooms -- the first was his office, the second was our living/dining room and the third was our bedroom (just big enough for a double bunk (you and I slept on ,the top bunk), and some orange crates to use as a dresser of sorts. Outside in the woods was the needed toilet. Also outside were beautiful woods and a delightful mountain stream. The house was built across the highway from two tents in which two of your Dad's foremen lived with their wives. A half mile or so down the road was the big camp for the workmen -- about 100 of them who worked, at that time, for 50 cents an hour.

Your grandmother visited us during the summer for a few days and as I think of it now she must have worried about the circumstances in which: her baby daughter was living, but she never complained. She enjoyed the beauty of the surroundings and so did I. Really, it was a very pleasant summer. We had a little excitement one day when they were blasting tree trunks for the new highway, and bur little house could have been destroyed. One huge trunk (about 4 feet in diameter) was blown under the back door of our bedroom. From then on, I had a back porch.

But the big excitement carne early in November when we awakened to see a beautiful white world. Snow on every branch of the evergreens, snow and ice on the road, snow on the rocks of the stream. I ,was very excited, but your Dad was worried, and with good reason, it turned out.

The highway to the coast and to the east was closed and the train, couldn't get through. I Learned later that the two women across the highway began boiling water as soon as they got up, just in case you should decide to arrive a month early. But I wasn't a bit worried -- I just enjoyed that snow. But that night there were avalanches all around us and the stream became a river. We stayed up a long time while Dad went out every hour to measure the rise of the river just in case
we needed to get on higher ground. But the river went down before morning. And by noon the next day the train carne through. And you know who was on it -- you and your mother.

One of the women across the road had a sister named Nell Barber who had 6 kids (aged 2 to 20) and lived in Seattle. Arrangements were made for me to stay in Nell's house and pay board until Jim came home from the construction job. I missed your Dad a lot at that time, but there was a lot of distraction with the Barber family. They were very good to you and me.

***

On December 9, your Dad finished the work at Berne for that year. He loaded our car on a big truck, but again couldn't get to the coast over the shortest route. We had to go a couple of hundred miles out of the way to get to Seattle. I had started into labor before he arrived at the Barber family place, so they took me to Providence Hospital that day (the 9th of December). However, my labor pains were spasmodic so I went to sleep. I had pains off and on the next day, and you were born about midnight. You weighed 7 pounds and 5 ounces and had. a strong pair of lungs. The doctor had to make an instrument delivery (it was Johnny Marcks fault -- really the nurses fault) so your lip was cut and your head was kind of pointed. These things disappeared (the cut and the point) in a couple of days.

Your Dad and I were delighted with our new little son. In fact, your Dad was so excited the night you were born that he called my mother and told her that the baby was 7 feet 5 inches and weighed 20 pounds. Your grandmother and grandfather Truher and May were at the hospital when you were born. You, of course, were the first grandchild in that family and they were almost excited as your dad .

December 10, 1934 through April, 1935 -- SEATTLE APARTMENT

On December 11 and some days following, I was in a state of euphoria because I sincerely felt that I had participated in a miracle. Here was this healthy, strong, cute little boy brand new to the world. I was in a room in PROVIDENCE HOSPITAL and my roommate was Helen Marcks. In those days mothers and babies stayed in the hospital two weeks, so you and I and Helen and Johnny Marcks got well acquainted.

While we were there, Dad scoured Seattle looking for a furnished apartment which we could afford. He found one at
1616 E. Howell on the third floor. I'll never forget going horne from the hospital. I carried you until we got ready to go in the apartment house and then your Dad carried you for the first time. He was so very, very careful of you that I had to smile, but I couldn't let him see me smile because he was so earnest and obviously felt such a sense of responsibility.
I had a hard time walking up all those stairs (no elevators) because I had a lot of stitches and was all bent over. It was a nice enough apartment and we kept you in our bedroom (the only one) .

The four months or so we spent there were pleasant and uneventful after the first couple of weeks. You and I had problems those first two weeks because my doctor insisted that I should nurse you *** and I was anxious to be a good mother. However, you cried and yelled and acted as if you were hungry all the time. The doctor had us buy a baby scale and weigh you before and after feeding and the quantity of fluid was sufficient so the doctor said I must be exaggerating and to let you cry -- it was good for your lungs. But I didn't believe it after a while and went to the drug store and got a baby formula to supplement your feeding and after that you were fine.

Somewhere in March or April we had word that Bob Erskire and three or four other fraternity brothers of your Dad's were coming to Seattle en route home from playing basketball in Japan. The first we knew any more about it was about 8:00 a.m. on a Sunday morning when a lady from downstairs came up and told us there were a bunch of guys down there yelling "Truher! Truher! Truher!" So they got acquainted with you and spent the day with us. The reason this was a big event for me was that I didn't know anyone in Seattle except Nell Barber (You and I lived with her before you were born) and your grandparents and Mike and Minerva McDermott and Mike McDermott Jr. who was about 3 years old.

You were baptized in the church in Renton, Washington, with your Aunt May and Uncle Louis as godparents. Your grandparents and parents also attended. I dont think you cried, but maybe a little.

Your Dad did all your laundry because the tubs were in the basement four floors down. I remember Mike McDermott looking down his nose and saying that was "women's work", but your dad was helping you and me the way he has done all his life.

This apartment was on Capital Hill and grocery shopping was nearby. We never had money to have a baby sitter or go anywhere except drive to your grandparents so you had a great deal of attention from parents and grandparents. I used to take you in your baby carriage over to see Minerva McDermott and past Volunteer Park to see Nell Barber -- but that was only when it wasn't raining, which in those months was very, very rare.

By the time we moved you were about four months old and weighed somewhere around 16 pounds. I took you to a pediatrician regularly and he said you were in perfect health. You had grown about 6 inches, and were beginning to get sore gums because you got your first tooth at five and half months after we moved. You were sweet and good natured and fun to play with. I talked to you a lot and you seemed to try to talk back.
• Wednesday, February 16, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA1 √ Jim2-Jack 1930s-1940s (pics and text)
•  picture F1. There are two stories associated with this picture in the course of this NoteBook preparation. The most likely location of the shack photo was at Berne, (Washington State), not at Sauvies Island (near Portland) as Jim2 has recently reconstructed (just below). The reason that Jack feels confident that picture F is at Berne is from the first page, with accompanying photo page, of the the text description that my mother HBT left us with on Jim2's early life. This story runs some 28 pages, and will hopefully be made available online as well. The picture there, while copied many times, is clearly the same Picture F shack. Mother's contextual story clearly connects this shack with the period of her late pregnancy with Jim2 at Berne, and with the legendarily dynamite blasted tree stump that flew a hundred yards over a roadway to position itself as back porch of dad's new shack.

Berne is located on the same rail line as the
more often discussed Scenic . Berne is on the Eastern side of the "Old Cascade Tunnel" built about 1900, while Scenic is on the Eastern side of that tunnel. There was a New Cascade Tunnel as well.

same URL:
http://www.northwestrailfan.com/scenic.htm

The web page just cited makes connections with several of the locations often referenced in Truher family Lore. Scenic and Berne are on the same rail line which led August Truher from Minnesota to the Tacoma station and with his family to nearby Kent, Washington. On the Eastern side of the Cascades through the same railroad mountain pass is Wenatchee. Skykomish is on the line.

So Jim2's story below, of another smaller shack at Sauvies Island belongs therefore in a different year, when Jim was starting school at five years old. A more appropriate location in this NoteBook for Jim2's recollections will be found in due course.
• Sunday, February 13, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA11 Jim2 1957-1985 La Canada family
 Note to Jim2 & Joby's La Canada family.
• progress reports
 February 06, 2005. We're moving along on the Albums project. Jim and I are annotating album pages as I get them scanned. About 50 pages of text are now associated with the preceeding historical picture album, PA1. If you see anything about any history suggested by the pictures you'd like clarified, let us know. We have largely completed the 40 pages (total) in my Photo Album 1, which is a history of our early Washington State wanderings. Plus the 1st of the two more recent four albums. Sequencing and reconstruction of the second photo album is nearly done. It's about ready to scan.

You can monitor progress over coming weeks or contribute
http://gene.truher.net/TBF.ntweb at the web page.

Start by selecting the "HBT albums" tab at right. Then HBT photo album 1, or 10. Set up two browser windows, one for selecting pages and text, the other for album graphic display.

The albums will be returned in condition so that individual pictures can easily be removed and replaced. I am carefully NOT going to glue anything down that isn't already stuck down tight. You recall the photos were not stuck to the old dried adhesive backing. Often the photot sequence was grossly out of order. The plastic page protectors were cracked and yellowed. The old album covers and backing have been be discarded. Nancy and I have time-sequenced the photos and placed them on "magnetic pages" for a 8.5x11 loose leaf folder. When you get them back, of course, you can easily remount them if you wish. For my purposes, the thin new clear plastic is fine for through-scanning the photos. The sequencing, presentation, and accessibility have been improved, but not to abandon the original album narrative intended.
 January 27, 2005. I have inventoried the content of what are in Helen Burke Truher's four albums which had been with Jim in Orange County. I have named these Photo Album 10, 11, 12, 13.

album content

PA-10 mixed [JWT1/HBT + JWT2/JBT] family

PA-11 JWT2 family photos

PA-12 JWT2 high school sport clippings

PA-13 JWT2 Stanford sports clippings
• Saturday, February 12, 2005
• Gottlieb family and children in Minnesota, 1870-1940
 From: "Ron Haack" <cookierhh@verizon.net >
To: "John Burke Truher" <
truher@earthlink.net >,
Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 16:51:32 -0500Minneapolis City Map, Truher-Haack-Frank terrain 1875-1950s

Hi, Cousins,

Handy little family research tool at:

http://www.mplib.org/history/streets.pdf

From the Minneapolis Public Library, this is a very late model street map of Minneapolis, in color. Big enough so that you can zoom into your old home sites very nicely.

For example, Snelling Avenue comes up a lot in the Haack/Zadach history. The trick is to locate Lake Street (east-west), lower 1/3 of map, scroll over from the vertical center toward the Mississippi until you see the slanted Hiawatha and Minnehaha streets, and there, right between them and touching Lake street, is Snelling Avenue, birthplace of my dad Herb Haack and a lot more!

Off Lake street a bit further west is the Cedar and Lake intersection, heart of old Haack/Zadach/Truher, etc. land. 18th Avenue South is one block west of Cedar Avenue. Homesteads of the Haacks and Zadachs are in that area, as well as the home of Bill and Tillie Frank (where Caroline Pein Truher died). The burial site of many of our clanspeople is further west along Lake street until you get to Hennepin Avenue, then south on Hennepin until it dead ends in Lakewood Cemetery.

Ron Haack
cookierhh@verizon.net
 because the Lietzau line may be traceable in location, to a particular European village. Florentine Lietzau-Truher (b. 1812) - married Martin Truher and then Mr. Johann Lietzau, Sr. , but surviving children by both, and many living descendants.
  Caroline's Obituary newpaper article text: "Services Saturday For Mrs. Truher"

"Funeral services for Mrs. Caroline Truher, 90 years old,
cousin of General Von Kluck, wartime marshal of the German Imperial army, will be conducted Saturday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Willam Frank, 2921 Eighteenth avenue S., at 2 p.m.

"Mrs. Truher was born in Germany in 1838 and came to this country 58 years ago. She moved to Minneapolis 37 years ago. She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Frank and Mrs. William haack of Minneapolis; two sons, C. E. F(T)ruher, Dubuque, Iowa, and A. L. F(T)ruher of Seattle; 10 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

"Further services will be conducted at the Anderson chapel, 1117 East Lake street at 2:30 p.m.. Burial will take place in Lakewood cemetery."
 or perhaps helping out at a large family friend's reception.

http://gene.truher.net/truher/GottliebCaroline/CarolinePeinTruher-wRelatives.jpg
 Kate Reed was wife to Charlie Truher

Descendants of Kate Reed

Generation No. 1

1. KATE REED died December 09, 1938 in Dubuque, Dubuque County Iowa. She married CHARLES EDWARD TRUHER Before 1913 in Dubuque, Iowa, son of GOTTLIEB TRUHER and CAROLINE PEIN. He was born August 11, 1870 in Wisconsin, and died September 27, 1951 in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota.

Notes for KATE REED:

From 1975 notes by Pat Schonborg:

"Mrs. Charles Truher, 37 Locust Street, died 12/9/1938 - graveside service at Mount Olivet Cemetery, (Dubuque, Iowa).

Attending Kate's funeral were:

Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Reed, Anamosa, Jones County Iowa, (brother)
John Harsely and Mrs. M. Yokum, Waterloo, Hawk County Iowa
Mrs. Al Bertsh, Sabula, Jackson County, Iowa
Mr. & Mrs. Sam Brien, Chicago, Illinois
Frank Hepman, Chicago, Illinois
F. Cooper, Chicago, Illinois"

More About KATE REED:

Burial: December 1938, Mount Olivet Cemetery, Dubuque, Dubuque County Iowa

Last Address: 1938, 37 Locust Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County Iowa
 Notes for CHARLES EDWARD TRUHER: Charlie and his wife, Kate Reed, were childless.

Charles Edward Truher's obituary, Minneapolis Star on Friday, September 28, 1951:

"Charles E. Truher, 81, of 5124 Thirty-fourth Avenue S., died Thursday.


"Charles E. Truher, 81, of 5124 Thirty-fourth Avenue S., died Thursday.

"A former policeman in Dubuque, Iowa, Mr. Truher is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Mathilda H. Frank and Mrs. Augusta A. Haack, both of Minneapolis.

"Services will be 10 a.m Saturday at Barney Anderson & Son chapel, with burial in Lakewood cemetery."

Notes by Ron Haack: "My Grandma Gussie Haack took me to see Charlie at a nursing home in Minneapolis in the summer of 1951, just before her train trip to Seattle to see her daughter Delilah. She told me that he was her brother, but not much else. He was in a pretty weak state but still wanted to put on his clothes and go to Seattle with Gussie. She just humoured him. That is all I know about Charlie E. Truher."

Jack can add about Charlie E. Truher, brother to August, Augusta, Mathildea Truher: My mother had a 5"x7" photo of Charlie in an album for many years. She said that Charlie was "very tall", leading me to think that he was perhaps 6' 6" tall. Ron Haack said he saw Charlie in a hospital bed and remembers him as a tall thin man. Jim2 saw Charlie in Seattle about 1942 (when Jim was 8 years old), and says that Charlies didn't seem as big as Jim1. Ron Haack's photo of Charlie Truher.
 The early records of St. Lucas Lutheran Church in Bay View, Wisconsin (era about 1875) show Gottlieb Truher's last name spelled "Truhr, no "e"". Caroline Truher's maiden name is spelled "Pein', several places.

Time line For Gottlieb & Caroline Truher:

November 21, 1832: Born, Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland.

1859: Married, Danzig, Prussia.

July 08, 1870: Gottlieb Immigrated to USA via NYC, with August as infant (August - actually born in 1866 in Prussia). Aboard ship, Caroline was pregnant with Charles Edward.
 Ron Haack: On Wednesday afternoon, August 18, 1999, I met Ramona Weaver as she pulled into the Kraft Farm in Wild Rice Township, Norman County, and Minnesota. This is former farm of Gottlieb Truher in the 1880's. Ramona is the daughter of Mrs. Kraft, who died last year. We talked for over an hour. She showed me the Norman County History book with articles on the Pinske family (Ferdinand, Ernest, etc.). The front half of the current house may be original to the Truher era (no proof). I took three photos, two of the house and outbuildings, and one of Ramona. The current address of the farm is Ramona Weaver, 2162 390th Street, Gary, MN 56545.

Ramona showed me the burial site just South and adjacent of the Kraft-Truher farm, on the current Pinske farm, with a monument to Ernest Pinske and historical markers. Because of poor lighting conditions, I returned the next day and took some photos. Ramona gave me a name of Ervine Pinske, man with one arm, living just north of Trinity Lutheran Church in Twin Valley. I failed to connect with Ervine.

There is a little Lutheran Church on Minnesota 200, about one mile East of the Truher homestead; however, Ramona said it started in 1919 and then folded. Records were transferred to Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Manhomen, Minnesota.

The Norman County Recorder's office in Ada stated that Norman County split from Polk County in 1881, which explains the census of 1880 and 1885 differences. There is no record of land purchased by Gottlieb Truher in the Polk County Recorder Office in Crookston, Minnesota. It looks like he staked out the land, homesteaded it and got his land grant later.

When comparing the current Wild Rice and Fossum Township maps side by side, the current Truher farm (the Kraft farm) is in the northeast corner of Wild Rice Township, second section in from the East. Wild Rice Township's northern border is Minnesota Highway 200. The north-south frontal road past the Truher-Kraft farm is Norman County 41 (two miles West of the Wild Rice - Fossum townships border. On Minnesota 200, about four miles East of the Truher-Kraft farm and in Fossum Township lies another Pinske farm. It just may be that the 1880 Federal Census showing the Truher and Pinske clans in Fossum Township, Polk County, is no fluke! Then, again, the 1880 Census Taker may have erred, and the Truher and Pinske farms were ALWAYS in Wild Rice Township. We may never know for sure.
 The early records of St. Lucas Lutheran Church in Bay View, Wisconsin (era about 1875) show Gottlieb Truher's last name spelled "Truhr, no "e"". Caroline Truher's maiden name is spelled "Pein', several places.

Time line For Gottlieb & Caroline Truher:

November 21, 1832: Born, Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland.

1859: Married, Danzig, Prussia.

July 08, 1870: Immigrated to USA via NYC, with August as infant (? - actually born in 1866 in Prussia). Caroline was pregnant with Charles Edward.

(From Filbey's "Germans to America", Volume 224, 1870:

From Germany to USA, Gottlieb Trur, age 38, Male, Farmer, Caroline Trur, age 32, Female, August Trur, age .11(eleven months, actually born in Prussia in 1866). Ship: Western Metropolis, from Swinemunde, Kiel and Christiansand to New York, arrived 08 July, 1870

From Jack Truher, Feb, 2000: "Now this begins to make sense. Of the three cities you list, two have somewhat different name adaptations. But this definitely begins to support the greater Berlin residency of the Trur family.

We can assume that the Filbey's entry probably means that the ship, Western Metropolis, began it's Western trip from Danzig. But it picked up the Trur family in Swineoujcscie (current Polish name for Swinemunde). Swineoujcscie is a shipping port, on the Baltic coast just at the border between Germany and modern Poland, about 50 miles north of Berlin. Then the ship traveled West to pick up additional passengers at Kiel, a major German port city on the Kiel Bay. In order to get out the Baltic Sea into the Atlantic, the ship must then travel north and then west. On the Southeast coast of Norway, the ship would have conveniently passed Kristiansand, another port where passengers boarded. Then on to New York.

The Danzig connection is: the ship's log would show that its journey began there. That association could be preserved in association with all passengers of that ship. I forget now how many sources have told us that Danzig was the Truher emigration point. I think there were other independent references of Danzig, but I can't name any of them, except the report I got from a German.")


August 11, 1870: Charles Edward was born in Wisconsin, probably Bay View. No Baptism record available as of 1999. Date verified per Confirmation Record at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

August 1872: Brother Jakob emigrates from Danzig, Prussia via Baltimore, Maryland and arrives in Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin sometime later to join Gottlieb.

Note: A picture was discovered in January of 2001 of the brothers Jakob and Gottlieb. The date is unknown, and could have been in the early 1870's in America, or in Germany before they emigrated.

January 22, 1873: Matheldie Helene (Aunt Till) born, Bay View, Wisconsin.

July 7, 1874: Herman Adolph and Julius Albert born, Bay View, Wisconsin.

July 21, 1874: Herman Adolph and Julius Albert die, Bay View, Wisconsin.

November 29, 1875: Gottlieb buys house on 156 Lenox Avenue, Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin (now 2370 and 2372 Lenox Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, 2 houses).

January 14, 1876: Auguste (Gussie) Amelia born, Bay View, Wisconsin.

June 1876: Gottlieb's last recorded communion at St. Lucas Church, Bay View, Wisconsin.

Mid 1876 - Mid 1885: Reconstruction, best guess: Gottlieb and Caroline and family went to Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota sometime after mid 1876. Note: Caroline Lietzau married Gustave Pinske on June 11, 1876 in McLeod County Minnesota. On January 7, 1879, Caroline Pein Truher was a Godparent to their son Theodore Hermann at his baptism in Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

The Truher family eventually migrated to Fossum Township, Polk County, Minnesota by 1880 (Federal Census) where they were shown as living either next door or on the same farm as Gustave and Caroline Pinske. The four children were also there, but Mother Florentine was NOT listed. (This part of Polk County became part of the new Norman County in 1881. Fossum Township is on the eastern border of Norman County, with Wild Rice Township adjacent and to the West).

Between 1880 and 1885, the family moved to Wild Rice Township, Norman County, Minnesota, where they staked and worked their farm. The 1885 special Minnesota State Census shows them in Wild Rice Township, Norman County, Minnesota, again either with the Gustave and Caroline Pinske family, or next door to it (see "Ron Haack", below). Just a short distance away was the Ernest and Johanna Pinske family farm. Again, the four Truher children (August, Charles, Matilde and Augusta are listed, but now Gottlieb's mother Florentine Truher is listed, age 79 and born in Germany.

June 4, 1885: Gottlieb and Caroline Truher sold his house at 156 Lenox Avenue, Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin to brother Jakob Truher for $700. Gottlieb and Caroline are listed as from the town of Wild Rice, Norman County, and Minnesota.

December 24, 1885: United States grants Gottlieb and Caroline their land in Norman County, Minnesota.

June 4, 1886: Gottlieb and Caroline get mortgage on above land from Hiram Upton.

1886: Some major catastrophic event descends upon the Truher family. See the notes on son August Louis Truher where he tells a story of death (?) and his mother Caroline coming down with typhoic fever, rendering her helpless and August forced to learn to cook, etc. Whatever the event, it caused the next several steps in the eventual migration of the Truher's to Minneapolis.

Note: In August of 2000, a Hennepin County Minnesota Probate Court document from the year 1900 was discovered which tells of the commitment of Gottlieb to the State Hospital for the Insane at St. Peter, Minnesota. Details below; however, it speaks of a lawsuit "with his brother" about the 1885 time period. Gottlieb never recovered from that episode. At this writing, there are no details about this lawsuit. During May and June of 2001, Ron Haack wrote letters to the Norman County Minnesota Clerk of Courts, and the Milwaukee County Historical Society (Wisconsin), asking for any information on such a law suit. In both cases, there is NO record of such a lawsuit, either for a Truher/Trur/Truhr as plaintiff or defendants.

September, 27,1886: Gottlieb and Caroline buy 525 Franklin, Hutchinson, and McLeod County, Minnesota. They are listed as from Hennepin County, Minnesota.

December 18, 1886: Gottlieb and Caroline assign land in Norman County, Minnesota to Phelps and Calkins, attorneys for Mr. Upton.

April 17, 1887: Son Charles Edward Truher confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

October 1888: Daughter Mathilda Truher confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

April 5, 1891: Daughter Auguste Amalie confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

April 11, 1891: Norman County, Minnesota sheriff forecloses Gottlieb and Caroline's Norman County land. They still owe $855.35 and they missed a $48 interest payment.

1891/1892: The Minneapolis City Directory lists August Truer, brakeman, as living at 313 10th Avenue North. No mention of the rest of the family.

1892/1893: The Minneapolis City Directory lists at 2932 18th Avenue South: August L. Truer, brakeman, Charles E., brakeman, Gottlieb, Susan (? -Augusta??), folder, Mpls Envelope Co., and Tillie, folder, Mpls. Envelope Co. The family had moved to Minneapolis. Minors and non-working women were not listed in city directories, thus the absence of Caroline.

Note: There is confusion about two addresses, 2930 and 2932 18th Avenue South. 2932 18th Avenue South MAY have become 2930 18th Avenue South by 1900. A Sanborn fire map of 1906 shows the house as 2932, THREE lots north of the east-west alley, just where 2930 stands today. Another possibility is that 2930 and 2932 are really the same house, just downstairs and upstairs. After 1900, 2932 is never mentioned again.

1893/1894: The Minneapolis City Directory now shows at 2932 18th Avenue South: August Truher, conductor, Charles E., brakeman and Gottlieb, but not the women.

November 7, 1894: Gottlieb and Caroline sell 525 Franklin, Hutchinson, and McLeod County, Minnesota.

1894/1895: The Minneapolis City Directory now shows at 2932 18th Avenue South: August Truher, Augusta, seamstress, Charles, brakeman, Gottlieb and Matilda, sewer.

June 1895: The special 1895 Minnesota State Census shows the following: At 2932 18th Avenue South (first floor assumed): Gottlieb Truher, age 65, Caroline, age 56, August, age 28, brakeman, Charles, age 24, brakeman and Gussie, age 19, seamstress.

At 2932 (2nd floor): William F. Frank, age 24, born in New York, Electrician and Matilda Frank, age 22 (Tillie Truher got married 1n 1893)!

At 2930 18th Avenue South (one house north of 2932, no longer there, or see Note above): Albert Frank, age 25, born in Minnesota, Expressman, Ida, age 28, born in Illinois and Sydney Frank, age 2, born in Minnesota (wife and son). It is assumed that Albert was William Franks's brother - verification is needed.

June 16, 1896: Auguste Amelia Truher (daughter) marries William Carl Haack in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, and Minnesota. They will live at 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis, the home of Louis and Amelia Zadach (brother-in-law and sister of William). Louis' father Friederick Wilhelm Gotthilf Zadach and stepmother Florentine (Florence) lived next door at 3032 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis.

November 4, 1896: Son August L. Truher buys 2930 18th Avenue South (old 2932, see above), Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota for $2100 cash plus an assumed mortgage of $1500. (Note: same house only sold for about twice that amount in 1954). This was a 2 family duplex.

January 1, 1898: Grandson Herbert William Haack is born at 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis.

Note: A picture was discovered in January of 2001 of Gottlieb and Caroline Truher with their daughter Augusta Truher Haack and their grandson Herbert William Haack. It is believed that the photo was made sometime in the summer of 1898. There is the possibility that the picture was taken in 1900 at 2930 18th Avenue South, and that the baby was their granddaughter, Delilah H. Haack.

November 27, 1899: Granddaughter Delilah Henrietta Haack is born at 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis.

May 17, 1900: William Carl and Auguste Amelia Haack and their children Herbert William and Delilah Henrietta move into one part of the duplex at 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis.

June 6, 1900: The 1900 Federal Census lists at 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minnesota: William C.Haack, born Nov 1873, cooper, Augusta A. Haack, born Jan, 1875, wife, Herbert, son, born Jan 1898, Delilah Haack, daughter, born Nov. 1899, Gottlieb Truher, born Nov 1831, married 36 years, immigrated 1871, 29 years in USA, not naturalized, retired, Caroline Truher (wife), born Aug 1837, mother of 9 children, 4 still living, August Truher, born Aug 1866 in Germany, not naturalized, railroad conductor. No Charles Edward! Also, William and Matilda Truher Frank had moved.
 i.e. misc on August-Mathilda-Augusta families

March 10, 1902: August L. Truher (single) sells 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis, to William Carl Haack (and wife Gussie, August's sister) for $1500 plus a mortgage assumption.

April 15, 1902: August converts to Roman Catholicism, changes his first name to Augustus and marries Helen Mary Nellie Barrett in the Church of St. Augustine, Austin, Mower County, Minnesota. He moves to Austin. It can only be imagined the profound affect on Caroline Pein Truher, his mother, who was a staunch Prussian Lutheran and sent August to only the best of Lutheran schools.

June 13, 1902: Grandson Harold Carl Haack is born at 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

December 5, 1904: Gottlieb dies in Minneapolis and was buried in Pioneer Cemetery, Cedar Avenue and Lake Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was exhumed in 1919 and re- buried in the new Haack/Truher plot in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota. (The Milwaukee Railroad appropriated part of Pioneer Cemetery in 1919).

July 24, 1912: Grandson Harold Carl Haack killed by streetcar on Lake Street in Minneapolis, Minnesota and was buried in Pioneer Cemetery, Cedar Avenue and Lake Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was exhumed in 1919 and re-buried along with Gottlieb Truher in the new Haack/Truher plot in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

December 12, 1928: Caroline dies at 2921 18th Avenue South, the home of her daughter Matilda Truher Frank and her husband William L. (across the street and a few doors north of Gussie Truher Haack's home where Caroline had lived for many years). She is buried next to Gottlieb and Grandson Harold Carl Haack in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis.

 On Wednesday afternoon, August 18, 1999, I met Ramona Weaver as she pulled into the Kraft Farm in Wild Rice Township, Norman County, and Minnesota. This is former farm of Gottlieb Truher in the 1880's. Ramona is the daughter of Mrs. Kraft, who died last year. We talked for over an hour. She showed me the Norman County History book with articles on the Pinske family (Ferdinand, Ernest, etc.). The front half of the current house may be original to the Truher era (no proof). I took three photos, two of the house and outbuildings, and one of Ramona. The current address of the farm is Ramona Weaver, 2162 390th Street, Gary, MN 56545.

Ramona showed me the burial site just South and adjacent of the Kraft-Truher farm, on the current Pinske farm, with a monument to Ernest Pinske and historical markers. Because of poor lighting conditions, I returned the next day and took some photos. Ramona gave me a name of Ervine Pinske, man with one arm, living just north of Trinity Lutheran Church in Twin Valley. I failed to connect with Ervine.

There is a little Lutheran Church on Minnesota 200, about one mile East of the Truher homestead; however, Ramona said it started in 1919 and then folded. Records were transferred to Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Manhomen, Minnesota.

The Norman County Recorder's office in Ada stated that Norman County split from Polk County in 1881, which explains the census of 1880 and 1885 differences. There is no record of land purchased by Gottlieb Truher in the Polk County Recorder Office in Crookston, Minnesota. It looks like he staked out the land, homesteaded it and got his land grant later.

When comparing the current Wild Rice and Fossum Township maps side by side, the current Truher farm (the Kraft farm) is in the northeast corner of Wild Rice Township, second section in from the East. Wild Rice Township's northern border is Minnesota Highway 200. The north-south frontal road past the Truher-Kraft farm is Norman County 41 (two miles West of the Wild Rice - Fossum townships border. On Minnesota 200, about four miles East of the Truher-Kraft farm and in Fossum Township lies another Pinske farm. It just may be that the 1880 Federal Census showing the Truher and Pinske clans in Fossum Township, Polk County, is no fluke! Then, again, the 1880 Census Taker may have erred, and the Truher and Pinske farms were ALWAYS in Wild Rice Township. We may never know for sure.
 on Gottlieb Truher's mental health diagnosis records.
 summary by Ron Haack

November 27, 1900: There is a commitment hearing in Minneapolis, and Gottlieb Truher is committed to the Minnesota State Hospital for the Insane at St. Peter. From the Certificate of Jury:

Gottlieb was not a member of a Church.

When were the first symptoms of this attack manifested, and in what way? Answer: Spring of 1886 after a law suit with brother, study and unusual interpretation of the Bible, excitable, etc.

Is the disease variable, ....? Answer: Yes. Variable in his moods and for a day or two seems rational. The predominant ideas recur at short intervals.

On what subject, or in what way is derangement now manifested? (State fully): Answer: Religiosity. Claims infidelity of wife and children. Outbursts of rage and temper towards family quotes Bible as his authority. The Bible tells him that he is to kill his wife and that the time is (to be ?) appointed.

Has the patient sown any disposition to injure others? Answer: Except (?) by frequent threats and claims that the time is coming when all should die.

What is supposed to be the cause of the disease? Answer: Worry over lawsuits in 1886.

The patient said (here state what the patient said to either or both examiners): Talked of his suspicions regarding his wife and family and his religious impressions(?). Excitable, talks loudly and boistrously.

Other facts: Suspicious of neighbors and threats of (?) violence. Is at times vulgar. Has frequently struck (?) his wife (?) insulted her.

Gottlieb was admitted to the State Hospital on November 27, 1900 and was discharged on July 29, 1901. There is no further mention of his mental problems, and no family stories about this episode.

[Jack Truher identifies Gottlieb's elderly state as Psychotic Depression]
 `Subject: Gottlieb's Mental Health Crisis began with Property Dispute

To: Michael Truher <
truone@verizon.net >, jim@truher.com
From: Jack Truher <
truher@earthlink.net >
Subject: Re: Truher family history; 1870s onward

October 10, 2003

Michael wrote in response to Jack's email of October 1, 2003 (a collection
of information from Ron Haack's genealogy files on August Truher et al):

MBT: This is absolutely fascinating - but something occurred to me while
reading all this detail. you have the information in this data to do a
'forensic' analysis as to the nature of the Gottlieb lawsuit. take
Haack's time line analysis and you'll be able to plot who lived where,
when and with who. I'd bet money the lawsuit related to a real
property dispute on or about 1885. another clue is that I always
thought our own father was a little "weird" about his own sons 'stealing
his money' - when he had absolutely no evidence or reason to believe
so. this makes me believe that August (and/or someone else) maybe
somehow took over the affairs of Gottlieb at an early age - maybe on a
informal (for the time) conservatorship basis ? this led to the mental
problems which then led to 6 months in the nuthouse. remember at the
time the average life expectancy was something like 47 years.

JBT: Good observations, Michael. I'll respond here to your points.

MBT: This is absolutely fascinating - but something occurred to me while reading all this detail.

JBT: I'm delighted you found as interesting as I do, brother Michael. I'm trying to assemble such information and photo records into a more coherent whole. I know I will never be able to complete that task, but if I can get a skeleton in order with a representative collection, that will be fun for all of us. I can put all the unorganized data, plus emails like this on a CD. Then I can inventory the un-digitized records I have for eventual transmission to survivors. I intend to have an in-progress inventory on CD within a year. Then I can revise it was it becomes refined. I know the circumstances well enough now that I live in one foot in the 19th century.

Remember Michael, when we took that trip on the train around the USA with mother? I had asked to find any Truher's in the cities we visited, and she did go through the phone books. I don't recall the result. I think zero to minimal. She did that again for me by going through some library phone books of big cities sometime 1965-75, and found about five Truher surnames. I wrote to them all, and got a couple replies, which I still have. I wasn't serious. These were sporadic attempts.

The meanings of the recent discoveries to me are many and varied. First - has long been, why were were told so little about a segment of the Truher family that seems in retrospect to have been productive and sensible, particularly August's sisters' families? Perhaps because August and his sister's weren't told much because of the Gottlieb-Jakob tensions, and that Gottlieb-August tensions with his siblings? Sometimes tense relations just get to complicated to continue.

MBT: you have the information in this data to do a 'forensic' analysis as to the nature of the Gottlieb lawsuit. Take Haack's time line analysis and you'll be able to plot who lived where,
when and with who.


Yes, we have done that by inspection. Ron and I have had a periodic banter on the subject.

I'd bet money the lawsuit related to a real property dispute on or about 1885.

JBT: Yes again. And this is from memory. My best guess is that the dispute was between Gottlieb and his brother, Jacob, about the house the Jacob in Milwaukee "bought" from Gottlieb. Ron Haack has searched several municipal records with determination, trying to find any evidence on the point. I suspect that Gottlieb's paranoia was a factor, or his cognitive misunderstanding of contract law at the time, or perhaps a poorly written agreement. We know that Gottlieb lost the Minnesota farm, a substantial property because he was short only a few dollars payment. That would embitter anyone. Perhaps Gottlieb just asked for an advance on a payment schedule? Quite likely that Gottlieb and Jakob were in such dispute that they broke off relations. In all of Ron Haack's searching, Ron found no case that I am aware of when the Gottlieb line of the family were in contact with the Jakob line of the family.

MBT: another clue is that I always thought our own father was a little "weird"
about his own sons 'stealing his money' - when he had absolutely no evidence
or reason to believe so. this makes me believe that August (and/or someone else)
-- maybe somehow took over the affairs of Gottlieb at an early age - maybe on a
informal (for the time) conservatorship basis ?


JBT: We know that August was the conservator of record (though we don't have that word) for the document when August was the responsible family agent which committed Gottlieb for some months to the Minnesota institution for the insane. I have sent you those institutional records, though I doubt that you read them for this fact. I'll put them in order again on the web one of these days.

MBT: this led to the mental problems which then led to 6 months in the nuthouse.

JBT: Let's agree that the property dispute was correlated in the perceived grievances that Gottlieb cited during his state of Psychotic Depression.

MBT: Remember at the time the average life expectancy was something like 47 years.

JBT: Yes, but that was invariably because of infection or accident. People lived in good mental health then to very old age, perhaps not by much different percentages than today.
• Friday, February 11, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA11 Jim2 1957-1985 La Canada family
• album page HBT_PA11_01
• Click on the (+) bullet point at left
 Some text is compressed throughout this document. Watch for bullet points with (+) inside. To maintain viewing contact with the entire album, this album contains compressed bullet points with (+) sign inside, which should be clicked-on for more detail. When all text is expanded, a minus sign (-) is in the bullet point. See for example HBT_PA10_07, where text for pictures A and D contain compressed text.
• View this album's text and pictures together online by first setting up this text outline format web page window to fill the left third , or less, of your monitor viewing area. Leave it open. Click on any of the page links below, which should open a second web window for viewing the album pictures. Set this new window size to fill the right two thirds of your monitor viewing space. Navigate over this right window using the right and bottom border controls to find individual pictures on the page. When you select a new page link, you will replace the page in the right-window.
 Open and view the text associated with each of the album pictures on each page by clicking on the (+) bullet point symbol at left of each line below. This opens up a block of text. Close this text when you are ready to open text for a different page.
 View each album page without text by clicking on any one of highlighted links below,
e.g. page HBT_PA_02
  Jim Truher Jr., Eliot Junior High School, 1949.
• album page HBT_PA11_02
  Jim Truher Jr., Eliot Junior High School, 1950.
• album page HBT_PA11_03
  Jimmie T's first grade class picture, at Sauvies Island, Spring 1940, not far from Portland.
• album page HBT_PA11_04
  Jimmie T's Christmas letter to his father, 1942
• album page HBT_PA11_06
• album page HBT_PA11_05
  A & B. Frost Amphetheater, Stanford University graduation ceremonies for Jim2, 1957.

C. Jim2 and Jim1 standing.
Joby at left, Michael Truher hold JWT3, HBT seated at left.


D.
Babtism of JWT3. Joby holding Jim3. Joby's mother at left. May Truher, JWT1's sister is at right.
  A. Joby hold JWT3.
B. Joby's mother hold JWT3.
• album page HBT_PA11_08
• album page HBT_PA11_07
  A. JWT1,3,2
B. JWT3 with mother Joby
C. JWT3
  A. JWT1, Jack, Michael, JWT3, JWT2

B. JWT3, JWT2
C. JWT3
  D, E, F Sarah Truher in Spring of 1960 joins her brother.
• album page HBT_PA11_09
• album page HBT_PA11_10
  top: Sarah being held by Joby in backyard of Altadena home, 803 Morada Place.

bot: Sarah Truher
 various views of Joby and Jim2 with Jim3 and Sarah. Picture B has Helen Burke Truher holding Sarah.
• album page HBT_PA11_11
  Picture A. Jim2 is holding baby, but could be Julie or Jim3? This picture may not be time sequenced for this page.

Picture B. Sarah, Jim3, Julie.

Picture C. Jim3 and Julie are with grandmother Helen Truher. Sarah closer to mother Joby.

Picture D. Jim2 and Jim1 Truher at 803 Morada place with Jim1's 1957 Cadillac in background.

Picture F. Mary Pat.
• album page HBT_PA11_12
  Picture A. Jim3 with Julie and Sarah.

Picture C. Grandmother Nelson with Joby's four children at New Years' day by float assembly on early morning before parade on Jan. 1st.

Picture E. Jim2-Joby four kids with Jim1 and Joby in background. This is at 245 Hillside Road, South Pasadena, Jim1's new house.

Picture F. Mary Pat with dolls.
• album page HBT_PA11_13
• album page HBT_PA11_14
  All of Julie Truher.
• album page HBT_PA11_15
  Picture C is Mary Pat with Sarah.
• album page HBT_PA11_20
  same family growing up.
• album page HBT_PA11_21
  Picture C. is Kathy (Jim3 wife) with Jim1 and Jim3 receiving present from Mary Pat.
• album page HBT_PA11_22
  Picture C is Jim1 with son Michael.
• album page HBT_PA11_23
  page features Jim3 and Kathy wedding. Picture C is Sarah. Picture E is Mary Pat being assisted..
• album page HBT_PA11_24
  Various pictures of Jim3 and Sarah. Picture E has the four Jim2-Joby children.
  usual subjects
  family on 245 Hillside property.
  Picture E. shows Jim2 in foreground with red sweater in 1971 encounter at 245 Hillside, South Pasadena, as explained below.

Picture F. At right among three men is John Wright, Jim2 college friend who killed himself and wife in a Nevada (?) air show. Jim wrote:

"John Wright and his wife Barbara were among my best friends at Stanford and for many years after - Job and I spent our honeymoon at John's parents' 500,000 acre cattle ranch in Nevada; John was in my fraternity (Delta Tau Delta), an Air Force pilot, a chief pilot for Pan American. He killed himself and wife in 1983 in a rebuilt WWII Mustang Fighter plane while showing off, flying 200 mph, upside down, 500 feet above the ground."

Steve Doctor next to John Wright was a good friend in college too and later. He played fullback on football team, was a Delt and a fellow commiserater at Stanford. I’m pretty sure the left most in this photo is Lucky Palmieri who was/is a good friend of Steve’s.
• album page HBT_PA11_18
• album page HBT_PA11_16
  Picture A is Jim3.

Picture B & C. Mary Pat.

Picture D. Jim1 and Jim2.

Picture E. Helen, Michael, Joby, Jim2, Jim 1.
• album page HBT_PA11_17
• album page HBT_PA11_19
• album page HBT_PA11_26
  Jim3 baby Jim4 has appeared being held in Picture B by great grandmother Helen Truher.
• album page HBT_PA11_25
• album page HBT_PA11_31
• album page HBT_PA11_30
  Julie, Mary Pat, Joby at top with Jim2 at right. Jim2 and Jim3 at bottom.
• album page HBT_PA11_29
  Jim 4 at top. Jim1,3,4 at bottom.
• album page HBT_PA11_27
  features mother Kathy with Jim3.
  some duplicates from previous page
• album page HBT_PA11_28
  page features Jim3 and Jim 4.
• album page HBT_PA11_07 c
• album page HBT_PA11_08ab
 
 
• album page HBT_PA11_08c
 
• album page HBT_PA11_10a
 
• album page HBT_PA11_10b
  album page HBT_PA11_31c2014
  same wall of photos, enlarged for better resolution, but not much improvement for the effort.
• Thursday, February 10, 2005
• August-Nellie
 HBT writes from Helen Alderman Truher letter to Helen Burke Truher, and leaves transcription for her sons. "Below you will find a typed copy of the substantive portions of a letter written to me (Helen Burke Truher) by your father's eldest sister (Helen Truher Alderman). The letter is five handwritten pages, so I will just copy all portions relating to her knowledge of the Truher-Paine family."
• Tuesday, February 8, 2005
• Haack_Ron's, great genealogy charts
 Map of Minneapolis, Truher-Haack-Frank terrain
 Haack: -- related to Truher through Augusta Truher Haack (1876-1953), cousin Ron's grandmother, and sister to Jack's grandfather.

Frank: -- related through husband of Matheldie Helene Truher Frank, Augusta's sister. Matheldie now has her own hourglass chart. I feel like I know these sisters, Matheldie and Augusta, of August better now - though the pictures and stories that Ron has sent me which give breadth and context to grandfather August Truher's relatives.

Deuel: -- related through husband of Delilah Henrietta Haack Deuel (1899-1983), daughter of Augusta Truher Haack

Burke: related through Helen Burke Truher, mother of Jim , Jack, Michael Truher..

Pinske: -- related through Gustave E. Pinske (1847-1911) who married Caroline Lietzau (1849-1923), daughter of Florentine Lietzau Truher. Caroline Lietzau is grandmother of Pat Schonborg (Palmetta Lauretta Gill (1925 - )

Zadach: -- related through Amelia Haack (1867-1949), (descendant of Jakob Truher) who was married to John Louis Zadach - abd related to the current Professor Larry Fike (not Jack's blood relative) which Jack Truher discovered working at Washington State (Spokane or similar univ)

Muelling: -- related through Frederick Muelling (1857-1926) who is maternal grandfather of Ronald Herbert Haack (1937 - )

Jaeger: -- related through Wilhelm Bogislav Jaeger (1791 - ) is generations antecedent to Ronald Herbert Haack (1937 - )

Globke: -- related through grandfather of Augusta Truher Haack's husband, William Carl "Will" Haack.
•  have been identified by me, as associated above. I don't know what is relationship of the three remaining.

"Kathleen Alice Bickelhaupt" <
bmvondra@sedona.net >,
"Kathleen Mary Tako" <
KMTako@aol.com >,
√ "Mike and Kathleen Rancour" <
kajaeger@aol.com >,
"George Robert Janssen" <
grjanssen@excite.com >,
√ "Paul Eugene Zadach" <
pzadach@cox.net >,
√ "Jeanie Smith Zadach" <
DaisyZ@aol.com >,
√ "John Burke Truher" <
truher@earthlink.net >,
√ "Dick Frank" <
dfrankgh@comcast.net >

Ron's first link is a windows media experiment:

http://www.mickey-cookie.whsites.com/media/videos/carl_haack_photo_movie_trial.wvx
 Subject: MINNEAPOLIS MAP IN PDF 1875-1950s

From: "Ron Haack" <
cookierhh@verizon.net >
To: "John Burke Truher" <
truher@earthlink.net >,

Date: Thu, 27 Jan 2005 16:51:32 -0500

Hi, Cousins,

Handy little family research tool at:

http://www.mplib.org/history/streets.pdf

From the Minneapolis Public Library, this is a very late model street map of Minneapolis, in color. Big enough so that you can zoom into your old home sites very nicely.

For example, Snelling Avenue comes up a lot in the Haack/Zadach history. The trick is to locate Lake Street (east-west), lower 1/3 of map, scroll over from the vertical center toward the Mississippi until you see the slanted Hiawatha and Minnehaha streets, and there, right between them and touching Lake street, is Snelling Avenue, birthplace of my dad Herb Haack and a lot more!

Off Lake street a bit further west is the Cedar and Lake intersection, heart of old Haack/Zadach/Truher, etc. land. 18th Avenue South is one block west of Cedar Avenue. Homesteads of the Haacks and Zadachs are in that area, as well as the home of Bill and Tillie Frank (where Caroline Pein Truher died). The burial site of many of our clanspeople is further west along Lake street until you get to Hennepin Avenue, then south on Hennepin until it dead ends in Lakewood Cemetery.

Ron Haack
cookierhh@verizon.net
• Monday, February 7, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA10 Jim2 1934-1952 + 1970s Pac Bell
 album page HBT_PA10_18
• album page HBT_PA10_09
  Jim's 5th grade class picture, St. Elizabeth's Parachial School, Altadena. Jim is 2nd row, 5th from left.
  more TV
 album page HBT_PA10_14
  A. Jim is on board the USS Albert T. Harris somewhere in middle of the Atlantic Ocean. Year is 1957.

B. John Marcks grown up at left, Jim, and Mike Holmes at right.

C. Ensign Truher.
 album page HBT_PA10_15
  text on the page
• Sunday, February 6, 2005
• text modifications in progress
• Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2005 20:57:06 -0800
From: "James W. Truher (ATT)" <
truher@attglobal.net >
Subject: RE: Sauvies Island
To: Jack Truher <
jbt@truher.net >
Reply-to:
truher@attglobal.net
X-ELNK-AV: 0



-----Original Message-----
From: Jack Truher [mailto:jbt@truher.net ]
Sent: Thursday, February 03, 2005 10:09 AM
To: jim@truher.com
Cc: michael@truher.com
Subject: Sauvies Island



With regard to
http://gene.truher.net/HBT/PA10/HBT_PA10_04.jpg

concerning picture E.

E. Dad with Jack and brother Jim. Here dad looks unhappy, even angry. Late 1942. For mother to include these unhappy expressions (see also picture B on this page) is almost certainly deliberate. Marriage is a terrible thing.

Do you think this picture is of the "150 yard, 3 car ferry ride" or a different ferry?
I DON’T SEE THE FERRY BUT THIS COULD WELL BE NEAR THE LOCATION. THE WIDTH OF THE CHANNEL, HILLS ON THE LEFT AND LAND ON THE RIGHT ARE ALL CONSISTENT WITH THE AREA OF THE SAUVIES ISLAND FERRY 60+ YEARS AGO. I VISITED THIS AREA LAST YEAR, DROVE ACROSS THE BRIDGE BUILT IN THE 60’S? AND TOURED SAUVIES.

As to Sauvies Island, I must presume that dad had a job working there while we lived there, or was that simply the parents' chosen place to live.
YES, DAD WORK ON IMPROVING THE INTEGRITY OF THE DIKE AROUND THE ISLAND SO THAT COLUMBIA RIVER HIGH WATER CONDITIONS WOULD NOT FLOOD THE ISLAND.

on today's <
http://gene.truher.net/TBF.ntweb/?9 >TBF web page,


i.e
http://gene.truher.net/TBF.ntweb/?9

for <
http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/HBT_PA1_05web.jpg >album page 5

• Saturday, February 5, 2005
• Gottlieb family and children in Minnesota, 1870-1940
 August Truher's first family home, Austin, Minn.

Ron Haack: In early August, 1999, I went to the Church of Saint Augustine, in Austin, Minnesota. where I met Father Nelson. He researched the marriage records of 1902 and confirmed the marriage date of April 15, 1902 for Augustus and Helen Truher. I then visited the Mower County Courthouse in Austin, where I found the location of the land and future home of Augustus and Helen, at the current address of 911 2nd Avenue, N.E., Austin, Minnesota. I have photos of the church and of the house.
 Truher-Frank-Haack families, Minneapolis, 1902 -1928, from Ron Haack -
 Gottlieb Truher family, 1870-1901. from Ron Haack- ,
 Star Car, initially August Truher's car from about the 1920s; text from a letter exchange between brothers JWT2 (Jim) and JBT (Jack) about 2002.

The Star Car of the 1920s

From Jack to Jim

It was color black, right? Do you remember dad tearing the components off to salvage the frame, and then building the trailer box? Who did the welding? Did you see the removed elements trucked away?From Jim (JWT2) to Jack (JBT)

For years the Star was stored in a small garage type shed some distance behind our house in Riverton Heights. I used to go back there just to look at it, up on blocks and rusting away. Jack was probably too small to go with me, cause I was around 6 or 7. It was black and very interesting, although covered with dust, cobwebs and junk all around in the shed.

It was color black, right? YES Do you remember dad tearing the components off to expose salvage the frame, and then building the trailer box? NO and IT WAS JUST A FLAT BED WITH METAL RETAINERS FOR INSERTION OF THE FOUR VERTICLE STAKE SIDES Who did the welding? DON'T KNOW Did you see the removed elements trucked away? AND NO.

Seems unlikely that grampa August Truher just bought it from a Dealer, since he didn't have an apparent need for it. $700 was a lot to leave rusting in garage. Maybe he "got a deal" on an abandoned shipment that had gone unpaid. Would be interesting if it were built in Michigan or San Leandro. I DON'T KNOW, BUT MY GUESS IS THAT HE BOUGHT IT USED IN 1923, USED IT FOR A FEW YEARS TILL IT WORE OUT,

Grampa August Truher never drove it after that first day, according to Pop.

PUT IT UP ON BLOCKS AND LEFT IT THERE UNTIL IT BECAME A TRAILER. I WAS IN THE SECOND HALF OF THE FIRST GRADE (6 YRS, 1941) WHEN I FIRST SAW IT AND WENT TO LOOK AT IT VARIOUS TIMES AFTER THAT WHEN WE STAYED IN THE HOUSE DAD BUILT THERE.

Here's where we can put our stories together. I remember pretty clearly that pop said that grampa August Truher bought it and drove it home from a dealer. That doesn't necessarily mean new car dealer. I had gathered the impression it was a new car dealer. Also that "the boys drove it" which is why I chose (wrongly) 1923 for the year of purchase; you recalled 1922. The tale that Pop told was that the salesman instructed grampa Truher about the basic operations, and that was all the "driver training" that grampa ever had. He was so tramatized by the ride home, he never drove the car again.

============================================


 Michael Truher comments on Gottlieb mental health, and related experiences later in Truher family.
  Truher's, Caroline Pein obituary from the Minneapolis newpapers, December, 1928:
 COMPARE AGAIN BELOW : LOOK FOR DUPLICATION or UNIQUE LANGUAGE HERE
 by Jack Truher on the Danzig connection
(From Filbey's "Germans to America", Volume 224, 1870:

From Germany to USA, Gottlieb Trur, age 38, Male, Farmer, Caroline Trur, age 32, Female, August Trur, age .11(eleven months, actually born in Prussia in 1866). Ship: Western Metropolis, from Swinemunde, Kiel and Christiansand to New York, arrived 08 July, 1870

From Jack Truher, Feb, 2000: "Now this begins to make sense. Of the three cities you list, two have somewhat different name adaptations. But this definitely begins to support the greater Berlin residency of the Trur family.

We can assume that the Filbey's entry probably means that the ship, Western Metropolis, began it's Western trip from Danzig. But it picked up the Trur family in Swineoujcscie (current Polish name for Swinemunde). Swineoujcscie is a shipping port, on the Baltic coast just at the border between Germany and modern Poland, about 50 miles north of Berlin. Then the ship traveled West to pick up additional passengers at Kiel, a major German port city on the Kiel Bay. In order to get out the Baltic Sea into the Atlantic, the ship must then travel north and then west. On the Southeast coast of Norway, the ship would have conveniently passed Kristiansand, another port where passengers boarded. Then on to New York.

The Danzig connection is: the ship's log would show that its journey began there. That association could be preserved in association with all passengers of that ship. I forget now how many sources have told us that Danzig was the Truher emigration point. I think there were other independent references of Danzig, but I can't name any of them, except the report I got from a German information agency (copy available - Jack).")


 Gottlieb's farm home site in Wild Rice Township, western Minnesota -
  WWW on Gottlieb Truher, era 1875, name spelled Truhr
 dup?dup?jbt? notes on Gottlieb Truher by Ron Haack -- transferred by JBT may duplicate what is above
The early records of St. Lucas Lutheran Church in Bay View, Wisconsin (era about 1875) show Gottlieb Truher's last name spelled "Truhr, no "e"". Caroline Truher's maiden name is spelled "Pein', several places.


Time line For Gottlieb & Caroline Truher:


November 21, 1832: Born, Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland.

1859: Married, Danzig, Prussia.

July 08, 1870: Immigrated to USA via NYC, with August as infant (? - actually born in 1866 in Prussia). Caroline was pregnant with Charles Edward.

(From Filbey's "Germans to America", Volume 224, 1870:

From Germany to USA, Gottlieb Trur, age 38, Male, Farmer, Caroline Trur, age 32, Female, August Trur, age .11(eleven months, actually born in Prussia in 1866). Ship: Western Metropolis, from Swinemunde, Kiel and Christiansand to New York, arrived 08 July, 1870

From Jack Truher, Feb, 2000: "Now this begins to make sense. Of the three cities you list, two have somewhat different name adaptations. But this definitely begins to support the greater Berlin residency of the Trur family.

We can assume that the Filbey's entry probably means that the ship, Western Metropolis, began it's Western trip from Danzig. But it picked up the Trur family in Swineoujcscie (current Polish name for Swinemunde). Swineoujcscie is a shipping port, on the Baltic coast just at the border between Germany and modern Poland, about 50 miles north of Berlin. Then the ship traveled West to pick up additional passengers at Kiel, a major German port city on the Kiel Bay. In order to get out the Baltic Sea into the Atlantic, the ship must then travel north and then west. On the Southeast coast of Norway, the ship would have conveniently passed Kristiansand, another port where passengers boarded. Then on to New York.

The Danzig connection is: the ship's log would show that its journey began there. That association could be preserved in association with all passengers of that ship. I forget now how many sources have told us that Danzig was the Truher emigration point. I think there were other independent references of Danzig, but I can't name any of them, except the report I got from a German.")


August 11, 1870: Charles Edward was born in Wisconsin, probably Bay View. No Baptism record available as of 1999. Date verified per Confirmation Record at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

August 1872: Brother Jakob emigrates from Danzig, Prussia via Baltimore, Maryland and arrives in Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin sometime later to join Gottlieb.

Note: A picture was discovered in January of 2001 of the brothers Jakob and Gottlieb. The date is unknown, and could have been in the early 1870's in America, or in Germany before they emigrated.

January 22, 1873: Matheldie Helene (Aunt Till) born, Bay View, Wisconsin.

July 7, 1874: Herman Adolph and Julius Albert born, Bay View, Wisconsin.

July 21, 1874: Herman Adolph and Julius Albert die, Bay View, Wisconsin.

November 29, 1875: Gottlieb buys house on 156 Lenox Avenue, Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin (now 2370 and 2372 Lenox Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, 2 houses).

January 14, 1876: Auguste (Gussie) Amelia born, Bay View, Wisconsin.

June 1876: Gottlieb's last recorded communion at St. Lucas Church, Bay View, Wisconsin.

Mid 1876 - Mid 1885: Reconstruction, best guess: Gottlieb and Caroline and family went to Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota sometime after mid 1876. Note: Caroline Lietzau married Gustave Pinske on June 11, 1876 in McLeod County Minnesota. On January 7, 1879, Caroline Pein Truher was a Godparent to their son Theodore Hermann at his baptism in Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

The Truher family eventually migrated to Fossum Township, Polk County, Minnesota by 1880 (Federal Census) where they were shown as living either next door or on the same farm as Gustave and Caroline Pinske. The four children were also there, but Mother Florentine was NOT listed. (This part of Polk County became part of the new Norman County in 1881. Fossum Township is on the eastern border of Norman County, with Wild Rice Township adjacent and to the West).

Between 1880 and 1885, the family moved to Wild Rice Township, Norman County, Minnesota, where they staked and worked their farm. The 1885 special Minnesota State Census shows them in Wild Rice Township, Norman County, Minnesota, again either with the Gustave and Caroline Pinske family, or next door to it (see "Ron Haack", below). Just a short distance away was the Ernest and Johanna Pinske family farm. Again, the four Truher children (August, Charles, Matilde and Augusta are listed, but now Gottlieb's mother Florentine Truher is listed, age 79 and born in Germany.

June 4, 1885: Gottlieb and Caroline Truher sold his house at 156 Lenox Avenue, Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin to brother Jakob Truher for $700. Gottlieb and Caroline are listed as from the town of Wild Rice, Norman County, and Minnesota.

December 24, 1885: United States grants Gottlieb and Caroline their land in Norman County, Minnesota.

June 4, 1886: Gottlieb and Caroline get mortgage on above land from Hiram Upton.

1886: Some major catastrophic event descends upon the Truher family. See the notes on son August Louis Truher where he tells a story of death (?) and his mother Caroline coming down with typhoic fever, rendering her helpless and August forced to learn to cook, etc. Whatever the event, it caused the next several steps in the eventual migration of the Truher's to Minneapolis.

Note: In August of 2000, a Hennepin County Minnesota Probate Court document from the year 1900 was discovered which tells of the commitment of Gottlieb to the State Hospital for the Insane at St. Peter, Minnesota. Details below; however, it speaks of a lawsuit "with his brother" about the 1885 time period. Gottlieb never recovered from that episode. At this writing, there are no details about this lawsuit. During May and June of 2001, Ron Haack wrote letters to the Norman County Minnesota Clerk of Courts, and the Milwaukee County Historical Society (Wisconsin), asking for any information on such a law suit. In both cases, there is NO record of such a lawsuit, either for a Truher/Trur/Truhr as plaintiff or defendants.

September, 27,1886: Gottlieb and Caroline buy 525 Franklin, Hutchinson, and McLeod County, Minnesota. They are listed as from Hennepin County, Minnesota.

December 18, 1886: Gottlieb and Caroline assign land in Norman County, Minnesota to Phelps and Calkins, attorneys for Mr. Upton.

April 17, 1887: Son Charles Edward Truher confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

October 1888: Daughter Mathilda Truher confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

April 5, 1891: Daughter Auguste Amalie confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran Church, Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota.

April 11, 1891: Norman County, Minnesota sheriff forecloses Gottlieb and Caroline's Norman County land. They still owe $855.35 and they missed a $48 interest payment.

1891/1892: The Minneapolis City Directory lists August Truer, brakeman, as living at 313 10th Avenue North. No mention of the rest of the family.

1892/1893: The Minneapolis City Directory lists at 2932 18th Avenue South: August L. Truer, brakeman, Charles E., brakeman, Gottlieb, Susan (? -Augusta??), folder, Mpls Envelope Co., and Tillie, folder, Mpls. Envelope Co. The family had moved to Minneapolis. Minors and non-working women were not listed in city directories, thus the absence of Caroline.

Note: There is confusion about two addresses, 2930 and 2932 18th Avenue South. 2932 18th Avenue South MAY have become 2930 18th Avenue South by 1900. A Sanborn fire map of 1906 shows the house as 2932, THREE lots north of the east-west alley, just where 2930 stands today. Another possibility is that 2930 and 2932 are really the same house, just downstairs and upstairs. After 1900, 2932 is never mentioned again.

1893/1894: The Minneapolis City Directory now shows at 2932 18th Avenue South: August Truher, conductor, Charles E., brakeman and Gottlieb, but not the women.

November 7, 1894: Gottlieb and Caroline sell 525 Franklin, Hutchinson, and McLeod County, Minnesota.

1894/1895: The Minneapolis City Directory now shows at 2932 18th Avenue South: August Truher, Augusta, seamstress, Charles, brakeman, Gottlieb and Matilda, sewer.

June 1895: The special 1895 Minnesota State Census shows the following: At 2932 18th Avenue South (first floor assumed): Gottlieb Truher, age 65, Caroline, age 56, August, age 28, brakeman, Charles, age 24, brakeman and Gussie, age 19, seamstress.

At 2932 (2nd floor): William F. Frank, age 24, born in New York, Electrician and Matilda Frank, age 22 (Tillie Truher got married 1n 1893)!

At 2930 18th Avenue South (one house north of 2932, no longer there, or see Note above): Albert Frank, age 25, born in Minnesota, Expressman, Ida, age 28, born in Illinois and Sydney Frank, age 2, born in Minnesota (wife and son). It is assumed that Albert was William Franks's brother - verification is needed.

June 16, 1896: Auguste Amelia Truher (daughter) marries William Carl Haack in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, and Minnesota. They will live at 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis, the home of Louis and Amelia Zadach (brother-in-law and sister of William). Louis' father Friederick Wilhelm Gotthilf Zadach and stepmother Florentine (Florence) lived next door at 3032 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis.

November 4, 1896: Son August L. Truher buys 2930 18th Avenue South (old 2932, see above), Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota for $2100 cash plus an assumed mortgage of $1500. (Note: same house only sold for about twice that amount in 1954). This was a 2 family duplex.

January 1, 1898: Grandson Herbert William Haack is born at 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis.

Note: A picture was discovered in January of 2001 of Gottlieb and Caroline Truher with their daughter Augusta Truher Haack and their grandson Herbert William Haack. It is believed that the photo was made sometime in the summer of 1898. There is the possibility that the picture was taken in 1900 at 2930 18th Avenue South, and that the baby was their granddaughter, Delilah H. Haack.

November 27, 1899: Granddaughter Delilah Henrietta Haack is born at 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis.

May 17, 1900: William Carl and Auguste Amelia Haack and their children Herbert William and Delilah Henrietta move into one part of the duplex at 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis.

June 6, 1900: The 1900 Federal Census lists at 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minnesota: William C.Haack, born Nov 1873, cooper, Augusta A. Haack, born Jan, 1875, wife, Herbert, son, born Jan 1898, Delilah Haack, daughter, born Nov. 1899, Gottlieb Truher, born Nov 1831, married 36 years, immigrated 1871, 29 years in USA, not naturalized, retired, Caroline Truher (wife), born Aug 1837, mother of 9 children, 4 still living, August Truher, born Aug 1866 in Germany, not naturalized, railroad conductor. No Charles Edward! Also, William and Matilda Truher Frank had moved.


November 27, 1900: There is a commitment hearing in Minneapolis, and Gottlieb Truher is committed to the Minnesota State Hospital for the Insane at St. Peter. From the Certificate of Jury:

Gottlieb was not a member of a Church.

When were the first symptoms of this attack manifested, and in what way? Answer: Spring of 1886 after a law suit with brother, study and unusual interpretation of the Bible, excitable, etc.

Is the disease variable, ....? Answer: Yes. Variable in his moods and for a day or two seems rational. The predominant ideas recur at short intervals.
On what subject, or in what way is derangement now manifested? (State fully): Answer: Religiosity. Claims infidelity of wife and children. Outbursts of rage and temper towards family quotes Bible as his authority. The Bible tells him that he is to kill his wife and that the time is (to be ?) appointed.

Has the patient sown any disposition to injure others? Answer: Except (?) by frequent threats and claims that the time is coming when all should die.

What is supposed to be the cause of the disease? Answer: Worry over lawsuits in 1886.

The patient said (here state what the patient said to either or both examiners): Talked of his suspicions regarding his wife and family and his religious impressions(?). Excitable, talks loudly and boistrously.

Other facts: Suspicious of neighbors and threats of (?) violence. Is at times vulgar. Has frequently struck (?) his wife (?) insulted her.

Gottlieb was admitted to the State Hospital on November 27, 1900 and was discharged on July 29, 1901. There is no further mention of his mental problems, and no family stories about this episode.



March 10, 1902: August L. Truher (single) sells 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis, to William Carl Haack (and wife Gussie, August's sister) for $1500 plus a mortgage assumption.

April 15, 1902: August converts to Roman Catholicism, changes his first name to Augustus and marries Helen Mary Nellie Barrett in the Church of St. Augustine, Austin, Mower County, Minnesota. He moves to Austin. It can only be imagined the profound affect on Caroline Pein Truher, his mother, who was a staunch Prussian Lutheran and sent August to only the best of Lutheran schools.

June 13, 1902: Grandson Harold Carl Haack is born at 2930 18th Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

December 5, 1904: Gottlieb dies in Minneapolis and was buried in Pioneer Cemetery, Cedar Avenue and Lake Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was exhumed in 1919 and re- buried in the new Haack/Truher plot in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota. (The Milwaukee Railroad appropriated part of Pioneer Cemetery in 1919).

July 24, 1912: Grandson Harold Carl Haack killed by streetcar on Lake Street in Minneapolis, Minnesota and was buried in Pioneer Cemetery, Cedar Avenue and Lake Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was exhumed in 1919 and re-buried along with Gottlieb Truher in the new Haack/Truher plot in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

December 12, 1928: Caroline dies at 2921 18th Avenue South, the home of her daughter Matilda Truher Frank and her husband William L. (across the street and a few doors north of Gussie Truher Haack's home where Caroline had lived for many years). She is buried next to Gottlieb and Grandson Harold Carl Haack in Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis.


Ron Haack: On Wednesday afternoon, August 18, 1999, I met Ramona Weaver as she pulled into the Kraft Farm in Wild Rice Township, Norman County, and Minnesota. This is former farm of Gottlieb Truher in the 1880's. Ramona is the daughter of Mrs. Kraft, who died last year. We talked for over an hour. She showed me the Norman County History book with articles on the Pinske family (Ferdinand, Ernest, etc.). The front half of the current house may be original to the Truher era (no proof). I took three photos, two of the house and outbuildings, and one of Ramona. The current address of the farm is Ramona Weaver, 2162 390th Street, Gary, MN 56545.

Ramona showed me the burial site just South and adjacent of the Kraft-Truher farm, on the current Pinske farm, with a monument to Ernest Pinske and historical markers. Because of poor lighting conditions, I returned the next day and took some photos. Ramona gave me a name of Ervine Pinske, man with one arm, living just north of Trinity Lutheran Church in Twin Valley. I failed to connect with Ervine.

There is a little Lutheran Church on Minnesota 200, about one mile East of the Truher homestead; however, Ramona said it started in 1919 and then folded. Records were transferred to Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Manhomen, Minnesota.

The Norman County Recorder's office in Ada stated that Norman County split from Polk County in 1881, which explains the census of 1880 and 1885 differences. There is no record of land purchased by Gottlieb Truher in the Polk County Recorder Office in Crookston, Minnesota. It looks like he staked out the land, homesteaded it and got his land grant later.

When comparing the current Wild Rice and Fossum Township maps side by side, the current Truher farm (the Kraft farm) is in the northeast corner of Wild Rice Township, second section in from the East. Wild Rice Township's northern border is Minnesota Highway 200. The north-south frontal road past the Truher-Kraft farm is Norman County 41 (two miles West of the Wild Rice - Fossum townships border. On Minnesota 200, about four miles East of the Truher-Kraft farm and in Fossum Township lies another Pinske farm. It just may be that the 1880 Federal Census showing the Truher and Pinske clans in Fossum Township, Polk County, is no fluke! Then, again, the 1880 Census Taker may have erred, and the Truher and Pinske farms were ALWAYS in Wild Rice Township. We may never know for sure.





 Gottlieb Truher in Wild Rice township. Truher-Pinske country by Ron Haack, 1999.
 Ron Haack found record on Mental Health confinement of Gottlieb Truher, record of November 27, 1900:
• August-Nellie
 2003m1006 -- Jack Truher

My father almost never spoke about his own family background in any detail. There were so many unmentionable issues, off the table for discussion, that I never pressed my father about the larger Truher family.

Some of this reticence was due to the conflicted war years' experiences. Two world wars made identification as German risky in America.

Dad would tell occasional stories from his childhood in Kent, Washington. But I was curious about the residual Truher's in the mid-west. Knowing my interest in this, my mother checked in library through a number of big city phone books for me in the 1960s, looking for Truher surnames. I actually wrote to a few of these, and got perhaps three responses then.

In recent years, as a result of being found by cousin Ron Haack, I am able to put together what our grandfather August Truher's family was about. The short of it is that August's two sisters both married maintenance workers at the Minneapolis-St Paul railroad line terminal for a major rail company called The Milwaukee Road. Those sisters were then Mathilda Truher Frank and Augusta Truher Haack, whose lifetime family incomes were derived from that rail line. I think that Ron Haack's father became an electrician there. August also raised his family by the income of the Milwaukee Road, first laying new rail, then as a brakeman when that meant hopping atop moving cars to turn brake shaft wheels, and finally as a conductor for most of his working years.

My father told us only that "August was a conductor". We were told nothing about the rest of the railroading family. I'm not sure what Pop knew either. August was a very taciturn figure. My mother did not get along with August's wife, Nellie. There was probably some sort of family estrangement due to August's committing his father, Gottlieb, to a mental institution for a time -- or some combination of reasons. There was a religious family schism.

What I have learned through Ron Haack is that Mathilda and Augusta lived across the street from each other in comfortable, modest two-story houses in Minneapolis, raising their own families. There were active Lutheran cathedral affiliates.

Augusta had a daughter, named Delilah, who became Delilah Haack Deuel. In 1951 Augusta took a train to visit Delilah (and probably August) in the Seattle area.
What follows is an account by Ron Haack of his recollection of a drive to the train depot, starting Augusta on her journey.
 From: "Ron Haack" <cookierhh@verizon.net >

Subject: Milwaukee Road 1947

Date: Sun, 5 Oct 2003 00:50:48 -0500

This email has some Milwaukee Road's train pictures, scanned from a book, and my account of my grandmother Gussie Haack's trip to Seattle in about 1951. The book is "The Milwaukee Road" 1928-1985 by Jim Scribbins.

Attached is a Milwaukee Road photo from the summer of 1947. It brings fond memories back to me from that era.

The "Columbian" is the train that Augusta Truher Haack took to Seattle to visit the Deuel family and daughter Delilah, either in the Summer of 1950 or 1951, but definitely before the death of her brother Charlie Truher in Minneapolis in September of 1951. The advent of the much faster Olympian Hiawatha in 1947 resulted in changing the old "Olympian" to a new name, the "Columbian", older cars and drawn by a steam engine. Slower, more stops, old fashioned sleeper cars (bunks above each other, all in one car, none of those fancy rooms, etc.) You Deuel folks maybe could pinpoint the year better. I remember her telling us that she preferred the Columbian because it was a slower train than the Olympian Hiawatha. She also had her Milwaukee Road pass for free coach travel, sleeper extra.

I remember visiting Charlie Truher with my Grandma Gussie in a Minneapolis nursing home early that Summer. Charlie was in pretty bad shape, but wanted to with her to visit Delilah. Gussie encouraged him along, fully knowing he was in no shape to go, which makes me believe it was 1951. My dad Herb Haack and I and maybe others drove Gussie to the Milwaukee Depot on Washington Avenue in Minneapolis one nice Summer morning.

We saw her off in the station, then drove to a rail siding where my dad knew the "Columbian" would side until under way. Sure enough, there it was stopped, it's big old steam locomotive spewing smoke, ashes and steam. We parked along side the tracks, and when the train started to roll, there was Gussie at an open window, waving to us. All of us waved back.

Gussie had a good trip, but came down with a very bad cold, almost pneumonia, that Summer. She died of lung Cancer in August of 1953 in Minneapolis.

The Hiawatha in the top picture is very similar to the Twin Cities Hiawatha that my dad took me for an excursion one Summer day from Saint Paul to Winona, Minnesota. I remember the General Motors diesel-electric engine, shown in the top picture. We spent several hours in Winona, me eating too much ice cream that I got sick and heaved all up on the return trip to Saint Paul on the Afternoon Hiawatha from Chicago (a very crowded train). Methinks all this took place in the late forties, maybe 19548 or 1946, I can't be sure.

Sure beat our modern air travel! he,he.

 Ron Haack
<
mailto:cookierhh@verizon.net >cookierhh@verizon.net

Hi, Buffs (again),

I read in my Milwaukee Road book WHY Gussie took the Columbian over the Olympian Hiawatha. Remember that I said she told us she preferred the Columbian because it was not as fast as the Hiawatha.

My book later mentioned railroad passes. Employee's passes (and their spouse's) did not entitle them to ride the faster Hiawathas. Gussie was just trying to placate us, because no way was she going to pay full fare to ride the Hiawatha. That was Gussie, never complaining!

 Augusta Truher Haack's train trip to Seattle, 1951
 WW1 era, August's family repression of German heritage
 2003m1006 The information blackout about the Truher family that was communicated to August's grandchildren suggests some deliberate repression. We were reminded of this repression in the previous section on August Truher as told by his daughter Helen Truher Alderman:
 The article that follows bears on the repression that reached Jim-Jack-Mike Truher. The American population in WW1 had been deliberately taught to fear and disdain German soldiers as baby-killing, mutilating barbarians, in most instances, falsely.

In the 1960s, I became aware of stories of atrocities in Belgium during the march of Alexander von Kluck's Prussian first Army at the start of WW1. I read Barbara Tuchman's "Guns of August" carefully on this point many years ago. I do not think that Tuchman challenged the validity of the atrocity reports, which have been shown as largely false. This correction of history, which affected our understanding of our heritage, is explained below.
 Mr. Fleming's latest book is The Illusion of Victory: America in World War I (Basic Books, 2003). He is a member of the board of directors of HNN.

rom
http://hnn.us/articles/1489.html

6-09-03: Historians/History
by Thomas Fleming

on The Historian Who Sold Out

With historians heavily involved in either defending or damning the war in Iraq, it might be good time to ponder the case of Viscount James Bryce, the historian who sold out.

From the start of World War I, stories of German atrocities filled British and American newspapers. Most emanated from the German march through Belgium to outflank French defenses in their drive on Paris. Eyewitnesses described infantrymen spearing Belgian babies on their bayonets as they marched along, singing war songs. Accounts of Belgian boys with amputated hands (supposedly to prevent them from using guns) abounded. Tales of women with amputated breasts multiplied even faster.

At the top of the atrocity hit parade were rape stories. One eyewitness claimed the Germans dragged twenty young women out of their houses in a captured Belgian town and stretched them on tables in the village square, where each was violated by at least twelve "Huns" while the rest of the division watched and cheered. At British expense, a group of Belgians toured the United States telling these stories. President Woodrow Wilson solemnly received them in the White House.

The Germans angrily denied these stories. So did American reporters with the German army. Early in 1915, the British government asked Viscount Bryce to head a royal commission to investigate the atrocity reports. Bryce was one of the best known historians of the era; he had written widely praised books on the American government and on Irish history, sympathetically portraying the Gaels hard lot under British rule. In 1907, he had collaborated with an Anglo-Irish diplomat, Roger Casement, to expose horrendous exploitation of Indian peoples on the Amazon by a British rubber company. From 1907-1913, he had served as British ambassador in Washington, where he became a popular, even beloved figure. It would have been hard to find a more admired scholar.

Bryce and his six fellow commissioners, an amalgam of distinguished lawyers, historians and jurists, "analyzed" 1,200 depositions of eyewitnesses who claimed to have seen atrocious German behavior. Almost all the testimony came from Belgians who had fled to England as refugees; some were statements from Belgian and British soldiers, collected in France. The commissioners never interrogated one of these eyewitnesses; that task was left to "gentlemen of legal knowledge and experience" -- lawyers. Since the asserted crimes took place in what continued to be a war zone, there was no on site investigation of any report.

Not a single witness was identified by name; the commissioners said this was justified in the case of Belgians by the fear that there might be German reprisals against family members. But British soldier witnesses remained equally anonymous, for no apparent reason. Nevertheless in his introduction, Bryce said he and his fellow commissioners had tested the evidence "severely."

The Bryce Report was released on May 13, 1915. British propaganda headquarters in Wellington House, near Buckingham Palace, made sure it went to virtually every newspaper in America. The impact was stupendous, as the headline and subheads in the New York Times make clear.


GERMAN ATROCITIES
ARE PROVED, FINDS
BRYCE COMMITTEE

Not Only Individual Crimes, but
Premeditated Slaughter
in Belgium

YOUNG AND OLD MUTILATED

Women Attacked, Children Bru-
tally Slain, Arson and
Pillage Systematic

COUNTENANCED BY OFFICERS

Wanton Firing on Red Cross and
White Flag: Prisoners and
Wounded Shot

CIVILIANS USED AS SHIELDS

On May 27, 1915, Wellington House operatives in America reported to London: "Even in papers hostile to the Allies, there is not the slightest attempt to impugn the correctness of the facts alleged. Lord Bryce's prestige in America put skepticism out of the question." Charles Masterman, the head of Wellington House, told Bryce: "Your report has swept America."

Among the few critics of the Bryce Report was Sir Roger Casement. "It is only necessary to turn to James Bryce, the historian, to convict Lord Bryce, the partisan," Casement wrote in a furious essay, "The Far Extended Baleful Power of the Lie." By this time Casement had become an advocate of Irish independence. Few people paid any attention to his dissent, which was dismissed as biased. Clarence Darrow, the famously iconoclastic American lawyer, who specialized in winning acquittals for seemingly guilty clients, was another skeptic. He went to France later in 1915 and searched in vain for a single eyewitness who could confirm even one of the Bryce stories. Increasingly dubious, Darrow announced he would pay $1,000, a very large sum in 1915 -- more than $17,000 in 21st Century money -- to anyone who could produce a Belgian or French boy whose hands had been amputated by a German soldier. There were no takers.

After the war, historians who sought to examine the documentation for Bryce's stories were told that the files had mysteriously disappeared. This blatant evasion prompted most historians to dismiss 99 percent of Bryce's atrocities as fabrications. One called the report "in itself one of the worst atrocities of the war."
More recent scholarship has scaled down the percentage of the Bryce Report's fabrications; several thousand Belgian civilians, including some women and children, were apparently shot by the Germans in the summer of 1914 and Bryce more or less accurately summarized some of the worst excesses, such as the executions in the town of Dinant. But even these latter day scholars admit Bryce's report was seriously "contaminated" by the rapes, amputations and speared babies. They blamed this lapse on hysteria and war rage. This amounts to giving Bryce a free pass.

Correspondence between the members of the Bryce committee survived the destruction of the documents; it reveals severe doubts about the tales of mutilation and rape. One of the committee's secretaries admitted that he had been given numerous English addresses of Belgian women supposedly made pregnant by German rapes but could not locate a single case. Even the story of a member of Parliament sheltering two pregnant women turned out to be fraudulent. Bryce apparently brushed aside this negative evidence.

Lord Bryce the scholar should have known -- and almost certainly did know - -that tales of spearing babies and cutting off the breasts of murdered women were standard "hate-this-enemy" fables hundreds of years old, So were mass rapes in fields and public squares. He should have rejected such fabrications out of hand. Instead, he lumped them all into a general condemnation of the German army and people.

Why didn't Bryce dismiss the fabrications and concentrate on the German executions of civilians? Because that opened a very sticky subject. A high percentage of the Belgian Army were "home guards" who wore no uniforms except for an insignia pinned to their shirts or hats. The Germans, desperately trying to win in the West before the invading Russian Army smashed through their lightly held lines in the East, were infuriated by these seemingly civilian combatants, and showed them no mercy. They were entitled to do so by the rules of war in 1914. Some German field commanders obviously lost their heads and retaliated excessively against whole towns, such as Dinant. But a defense of sorts could be mounted, even for these men. The ensuing debate would have produced yawns in newspaper readers. They wanted what Bryce gave them -- blood and lust and horror.

The Bryce Report unquestionably helped England win the war. It convinced millions of Americans and other neutrals -- it was translated into 27 languages -- that the Germans were beasts in human form. No one except a few outsiders such as Casement ever reproached Lord Bryce for these vicious lies. He went to his grave loaded with royal and academic honors.

From a perspective of a hundred years, we ought to take a harsher view. The Bryce Report has obvious connections to the British decision to maintain the blockade of Germany for seven months after the armistice in 1918, causing the starvation deaths of an estimated 600,000 elderly and very young Germans. This was far and away the greatest atrocity of World war I and it made every German man and woman hunger for revenge. By creating blind hatred of Germany, Bryce sowed the dragons teeth of World War II.
 "Father told me that his mother (Caroline) saw to it that he went to school (Lutheran church schools) and insisted on his speaking "high German". She had been well educated in Prussia and made him study when he was a boy. He did speak beautiful German when I could coax him to help me. (Note During WW-I, he wouldn't let the children admit their German heritage at all.)
 August & Gottlieb families: records by Helen Truher,
mailed by Michael Barrett Truher of Los Angeles, CA, in 1999: optical character recognition of Helen Truher's typed copy supplied later by Ron Haack. - minor ed for clarity-2005m0205JBT printed to August-Minn-2005m0205.rtf temporarily on desktop
 August and Nellie Marriage Certificate, Austin, Minnesota,

http://gene.truher.net//truher/August/_ta002-AugustNellieTruher-Married-cropped.jpg

 August Truher married Catholic Nellie Barrett in this Church,

http://gene.truher.net/truher/August/_ta005-ChurchOfStAugustine.jpg

• August and Nellie Truher were married, here (interior of this Catholic Church , where was such an enormous investment when built. That implies a lot about ideology and social style. It is interesting for the very spare, undecorated, non-commucative, top-down learning style - perhaps more about Minnesota than about Catholic

Here is an interior photo taken by Ron Haack in the 1980-90 era..
ame URL:

http://www.truher.net/dot-mac-jbt/sites/NoteTaker/graphics/gen-ta/ChurchStAugustineAust1324.jpg

My sense:

The style is responsive to subdued communications of the region. The lighting of the sacristy is subdued as well; windows are very high. I would imagine the side walls are lined with stained glass windows, but still dark.

What is achieved is "rest", contemplative withdrawal. This is no center for dancing, dialogue, debate, or waving of arms and legs. Not much participation is implied. More about sitting still and don't get crazy. Listen to what the clergy says.

The big Catholic Churches I knew in the 1950s, built in the 1930s, in Southern California were covered with art-work. Little of the fleshy Italian, but lots of complicated colorful art.

Churches built after WWII were plainer, of less European influence, but brightly illuminated. More connection to the natural environment would be nice, but not too much.
 Ronald H. Haack finds August-Nellie marriage record
1715 Kinross Lane
Ft. Wayne, IN 46804-1481

1715 Kinross Lane
Fort Wayne, IN 46804-1481
September 1, 1999


Father Nelson
Church of St. Augustine
405 Fourth Street N.W.
Austin, MN 55912


Dear Father Nelson,


Thank you for your help in early August in finding and copying the 1902-marriage record of Augustus and Helen Barrett Truher. Enclosed is an annotated copy of that record plus a family tree of Helen Mary Nellie Barrett. From this union came a Sister, a Doctor of Education, a physicist, engineers and a preparing medical doctor. They all reside in the California area.

My connection to this family is through Augustus Louis Truher. His father (and my great grandfather) was Gottlieb Truher of Minnesota.
 Truher, August Accident of Record.
From an ICC accident report:

"Milwaukee Road Employees Involved in ICC Reportable Accidents, 1911-1940

NAME JOB TITLE LOCATION RR DIVISION DATE ICC REPORT ACCIDENT COMMENTS


Truher Conductor Ranier, Washington Not Stated Jul. 3, 1913 278 Derailment"
• Truher, August & Nellie
 "I checked with my brother Jim. August and Nellie lived in a fine Victorian, 3.5 story house on Queen Anne Hill from about 1940-45. That house is where the photos were taken that I sent you of my brother Jim and I being read a story on the floor while Nellie read seated on a stool above us. I was nearly four years old and Jim nearly 8.

From about 1935-1940, August and Nellie lived at a smaller 2 story property within steps of a tiny house my dad built on August's property including the tiny house at 3115 South 135 Street, Riverton Heights in 1937. August owned about 5 acres there, then only had his house and the little one my dad built for us. The little house was sold about 1945, and probably the larger house about the same time. This Riverton Heights location is now in the flight path, very near, and just north of the main Seattle-Tacoma Airport. The little house is still there. I suspect that August and Nellie's Riverton Heights house. Jim Jr. reports that the Queen Ann Hill house has been replaced by an apartment complex. Jim has seen, within the last couple of years, the tiny house where he and I lived, in Riverton Heights.

I don't have records or knowledge of August and Nellie's residence after about 1945. Somewhere in Seattle until Nellie died; then August moved briefly to Altadena and then to Hawaii where he died with his oldest daughter."
• Haack_Ron's, great genealogy charts
• On Ron's genealogy web site, there are the basic surname connections to Truher surname. Many of these relations are remote to the immediate interest of a Truher oriented reader. But the connections are real, and indicate the richness of the lives Ron Haack and researched and from which we were (unfortunately) so disconnected personally. But there are cultural connections. We learn more about ourselves when we consider what choices our relatives made. Finally we find that we are part of history.
 Cousin Ron Haack's wonderful web genealogy charts
• Ron writes to a contemporary email list. Those with the √ mark
• Friday, February 4, 2005
• Gottlieb family and children in Minnesota, 1870-1940
• Subject: MINNEAPOLIS MAP IN PDF
• Truher, Caroline Pein. Here is a web version photo of Caroline Pein at right perhaps helping with food services at a Haack family wedding, or serving at a wealthy family event.
We have also online in the same folder a picture of elderly immigrant Caroline Pein Truher, Gottlieb's wife, at high resolution
same url:

http://www.truher.net/gene/truher/GottliebCaroline/CarolinePeinTruher-wRelatives.jpg
 Charles Edward Truher's obituary, Minneapolis Star on Friday, September 28, 1951:
• Thursday, February 3, 2005
• Social Security Death Records for Truher surname
• social security death records for "Truher"

Entry Truher in here to find some death records online

Ancestry.com
• Wednesday, February 2, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA10 Jim2 1934-1952 + 1970s Pac Bell
  I know the story of the happy-go-lucky sailor hat boy. He was of a neighbor family. The boy wandered around and got acquainted. As he got older, he became difficult in school. Today he would be ADHD. He may have gotten in a few school yard tussles.

In 5th grade, his parents elected to have him lobotomized, a popular procedure at the time; since discredited. I was appalled at the time to learn of such an atrocity, and to see the impact on the boy's personality. He certainly quieted down. He became lethargic, dormant, stupid, absent curiosity. A real horror awareness of medical abuse as I saw this develop. I have never "trusted" the medical establishment since. I tolerate low risk medical interventions, and those reluctantly.
  B. Jim, Mike, Jack - early 1949. The film is fuzzy, not the processing.

C. Dad taking boys to shoot a pistol in the desert about five miles toward Los Angeles from Palm Springs.
 Jack recognizes the tall man at center as Val Rankin and his wife to our left. Rankin was a Seattle telephone company manager. The woman to right is probably Edna Burke's adopted and photogenic daughter, Donna. Donna married Benji anyway, and had several children in a what appeared a long-term marriage. Benji was family heir to a Los Angeles garbage empire. Benji was adjudged by Edna as too low class for Donna. Much tension. Benjie Kazarian's garbage company is BKK, which was in the headlines some years ago for law suit alledging massive pollution of a city in Los Angeles County.

Helen Truher may be 3rd from left. Boy behind her may be Jack or Jim? Boy with back to camera is unknown. Don Nasby looks to be behind that boy. The other women are not familiar. Not clear who all these people are.
  C. John Wright, friend of Jim2 with Jim1 behind Wright's chin. Jim writes: "John Wright and his wife Barbara were among my best friends at stanford and for many years after - John was a Delt at Stanford (as were Jim2 and Jack), an Air Force pilot; chief pilot for Pan American Airlines. He killed himself and wife in 1983 in a rebuilt WWII mustang fighter plane while showing off flying 200 mph, upside down, 500 ft above the ground.
  D. Jim2 about 1960.
  B.&C Jim2 as supervising Ensign, Skaggs Island Navy communications facility near Napa, California, 1957 or 58.
• 2004m1219 Genealogy Inventory Redundancy. √
 Redundancy is essential in preservation of information. That's rule one. So my intentions center on that notion.

We need a collaboration which gathers together information on who has what genealogy source materials, and whatever has been processed into readable materials. Our goal should be not only to preserve source materials in our various homes. We should also be sharing what we have. We should establish and maintain the best inventory we can in whatever time and priority anybody puts into that effort. We should also be taking steps to convert source materials to on-line scanned versions.
• Gottlieb family and children in Minnesota, 1870-1940
• Lietzau European family can lead to finding Truher European origins
• data sheet 2 rhhimage
• data sheet 3 imagerhh
• data sheet 1: rhhimage
• Tuesday, February 1, 2005
• Florentine Truher-Lietzau family origins, out of Europe
• Emerging investigation as to Truher European emigrant origins.

Much of what follows is based on a brief conversation with a niece of Pat Schonborg, a distant Truher-Lietzau cousin. Remember Florentine Truher-Lietzau was married first to Martin Truher with whom she had two sons; then Florentine married a Mr. Lietzau with other children. All this in Germany. Florentine's sons emigrated to America in late 1870s. These last village in Europe is not confirmed,. My best guess about their last point of origin is
Koscierzynak (German name: Berent).

image

same url:
http://www.koscierzyna.gda.pl/eng/

Here are some possible village origins, currently being re-evaluated) from this region of West Prussia, southwest of Danzig, Pomerania, etc.

1. PLAESCHEN

2. BUKOVITZ, BUKOWWITZIEC

3. PORORESKIE

4. KOSCIERZYNA (BERENT)

German records were largely destroyed by the Poles after WWII, but there is also reconstruction or removal of records to East German territory organizations.

We even have located an 18th century Susanna Truher, but no confirmation of our blood line.

http://gene.truher.net/truher/Susanna/LDS-SusannaTruher3.jpg

http://gene.truher.net/truher/Susanna/SusannaTruher-Year1713Chemnitz.jpg

We have other indications that the Florentine Truher-Lietzau people were from much farther south - Lietzau near Leipzig. Florentine herself said she was from just south of Berlin, according to Ron Haack's tape with Augusta Truher Haack's daughter.

Wherever they came from in the particular, these people were Saxon stock - the same who invaded England and left their mark there, long before they invaded America to Minnesota, leaving California with us.
 We are hoping to establish place of origin for Truher-Lietzau somewhere near Danzig, now Poland.

Jack wrote to Ron, mid-February 2005 10:38 PM

DID YOU GET Johann Lietzau Jr.'s MARRIAGE AND CHILDREN DATA FROM PAT SCHONBORG'S DATA BASE OR FROM YOUR OWN RESEARCH EARLY OR LATELY? SOMETHING NEW FROM THERE WOULD BE EUREKA FOR SURE.

I am not so sure that it was MY data. I looked up the data area of my Family Tree Maker and I show NO notes, or ANY sources, not typical if it was MY data;however, ALL entries are in the form of "Name" whereas anything from Pat Schonborg would have been "NAME" (all capitals, a sure signature of HER origin). I need to review my 25 year old hand written notes. At the time I was researching at St. Lucas Church in Milwaukee, I had no idea that Lietzau was so important, I simply noticed Caroline Pein Truher at Caroline Lietzau's wedding, and at least copied everything I could find.

--------------------------------------
Ron continued later:

Date: Wed, 16 Feb 2005 00:37:26 -0500

I have been examining (ransacking) my files all evening. I have found my original Saint Lucas Church notes, along with a 1978 letter that I sent to Pat Schonborg. Pat Schonborg also sent some tree charts to me in 2000, and one of my letters to her indicated I still had not entered all my family stuff into my computer as of 1999.

The data in my Family Tree Maker for siblings Johann Lietzau Jr. and Caroline Lietzau, and some other areas, was a partial entry typed in by ME from PAT's snail mail charts. It is incomplete, and so I must go MAKE it complete from her paper charts;however, my notes from Saint Lucas Church show that, verbatim:

"Bay View, Wisconsin - St. Lucas Lutheran Church. Baptized was Emilie Litzow, born 28 October, 1875, baptized 30 October 1875. Parents: Johann Litzow and Amalie nee Burant. godparents: Gottlieb and Caroline Truher."

Soooooo, our Lietzau family DID start out in Bay View (Milwaukee) Wisconsin, along with our Truher family, and all in the same church. Now, I show by Pats paper trees that Johann Lietzau had descendants (which are not yet in my computer) that ended up in northern Minnesota, blended into the Pinske line (ASIDE from Caroline Lietzau marrying into the Pinske line), AND THAT I MET SOME OF THEM, HAVE PHONE NUMBERS, ETC. AND NEVER KNEW IT! he,he, now I REALLY have some telephone calls to make!
 See Caroline Pein Truher (Gottlieb's wife) on right of next photo, apparently acting as caterer to wealthy family, or perhaps serving at large family reception.

http://gene.truher.net/truher/GottliebCaroline/CarolinePeinTruher-wRelatives.jpg

First home of August and Nellie Truher,

http://gene.truher.net//truher/August/_ta001-1903HomeAugustusTruher.jpg

Marriage Certificate, Austin, Minnesota,

http://gene.truher.net//truher/August/_ta002-AugustNellieTruher-Married-cropped.jpg

Jack with grandfather August Truher,

http://gene.truher.net/truher/August/_ta003-Augustus-John.jpg

August left the Lutheran Church to marry Catholic Nellie,

http://gene.truher.net/truher/August/_ta005-ChurchOfStAugustine.jpg

grandmother Nellie Truher with Jack and Jim,

http://gene.truher.net/truher/August/_ta006-NellieWilderJamesJohn.jpg
• Gottlieb family and children in Minnesota, 1870-1940
• Truher, Caroline Pein (Gottlieb's wife) on right of next photo, shown catering to a wealthy family,
• HBT Photo Album PA10 Jim2 1934-1952 + 1970s Pac Bell
• album page HBT_PA10_19
• album page HBT_PA10_10
  A. Jack remembers this as at a motel in Escondido, California, then a remote desert where Jim had a phone company summer job midway in college. 1953-54.

B. Jim home from college having learned the bad habits of the leisure classes, 1954.

C.& D. Jim's Stanford graduation, June 1957.
• album page HBT_PA10_11
  A. Joe Burke, youngest son of Glen and Mamie Burke, as Air Force Lieutenant with Jim2 as Navy Ensign. Chrismas 1957-58.
• album page HBT_PA10_12
  A. Jim1 and Jim2 Truher, 1966.

B. Mother with Jim2, 1968.

C. Joel, Heather(age 3), Nate Truher, 1974. Jk-Ny kids.

D. Mary Pat Truher (Jim2 daughter), 1970.

E. Jim2 newspaper clipping. 1968
• album page HBT_PA10_13
  Jim featured in newspaper clipping as telecommunications manager.
• album page HBT_PA10_16
  Jim on TV. Year?
 album page HBT_PA10_17
  A, B, C. Jim featured in Pac Bell corporate news.
  Jim2, 8th grade graduation picture, June 1948. Jim is top row, 3rd from left with a surprisingly tall group of Altadena cohorts.
• Monday, January 31, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA10 Jim2 1934-1952 + 1970s Pac Bell
 James Wilder Truher Jr., high school graduation year book photo
  A. Mother Helen with Jack, about 1943.

B. Jim, Jack, Helen Truher early 1939.

C. Jack at 8 months with Jim2.
  A. Jimmie at age 4

B. Helen Truher with baby Jim at age 7 months.

C. Jim standing by Jack (age 4 months.

D. This picture of Jack and Jim is in August's Queen Ann Hill Victorian. Jim says that August and Nellie lived in their Riverton Heights two-story from 1935-1939, and then moved to Queen Ann Hill about 1940 where they stayed until Nellie died and soon August left about 1946 for California and then Hawaii with his daughter where he died. This makes sense. I had the order reversed in my head until now.

Jim clarifies: "I was in part of the first grade while living in the house dad built in Riverton Heights, so that would be late 1940 or early 1941 (grand parents were still in Riverton Heights then. It is also possible that after the baby died we may have gone back from Chehalis to stay briefly in Riverton Heights before leaving for California."

Jack adds: Actually mother's record says that we moved to the Underwood Resort briefly in December mid-way in the Kaufman apartment era when I was four, and then moved back after my I attempted to jump out of the row boat to escape shark attack.

Jim continues: "I think that was some time after 1941, August moved to the Queen Ann Hill home. I remember being in the fourth grade in Chehalis, and was also in the second grade there, but don’t remember much about it except that we lived in two story house at the corner of the main street through town (Market St.)and the street that the grade school is on (7th St.??) about a block away. The Catholic grade school is still there but most all else has changed. When we lived there I think to population of Chehalis was 800."

What Jack remembers most is living in Chahalis Kaufman Apartment. Because I remember that so well, and remember almost nothing of the Riverton Heights house, we were living in the Kaufman apartments when we moved to Los Angeles. My collections in the Kaufman apartments include:

1. Spending a Christmas season there. Mother made a friend there, "Dori". I was very struck by Dori because she had at least two children, and was pregnant with a 3rd. She smelled very pregnant, which was good.

2. Dori had a wild and uncontrollable 6 year old - who broke into the Christmas presents stash and opened many of them prior to Christmas day. He would scream and trash and carry on. On at least one day, he became violent while in the care of mother, who locked him in our closet until his mother came home.

3. I also remember a boy about my age with a scarred face who had crashed through a glass door in the basement, where we both roller skated for exercise, especially when it was raining as usual.

4. I remember walking down the hill by myself to the tiny grocery story with a quarter to buy a loaf of break. I visited there in summer of 1959. Nothing had changed including the tiny grocery store down the hill, and the tiny immigrant couple running it still. I didn't introduce myself.

5. I remember accidentally locking myself into the bathroom of the Queen Ann Hill Victorian when I was about 3-4 years old. Whatever instructions I was getting to open the door were incomprehensible. Poor language skills. Big commotion. Somehow I got out of there.

I just looked up Mother's record of era (later going onto the web). Mother wrote we lived in Kaufman apartments for about 1.5 years, before we moved to L.A., i.e. from December 3rd, 1942 to June 1st, 1944. Our house in Altadena was in construction from June 1st, 1944 until September 24, 1944 when we moved in with the house in very rough, but habitable condition. I remember dad banging on the hardwood floors all hours of the day and night for weeks - before and after he went to work. So I was 5.6 years old when I started 1st grade at St. Elizabeth's.

August 30, 1943 was when baby Terese Truher was born and died. Big mom depression ensued.

Putting this text for this picture location is not very appropriate, but there is no picture of the Kaufman apartments in Photo Album 1.
  A. Jim & Jack Truher with John and Michael Marcks, 1941, in the Kaufman apartments.

B. Jim, Helen, Jack Truher in "Catlin Apts". Jack appears to be about 3.5 years old, or June 1941. Mother looks depressed in this picture. But baby Terese will die nearly two years later of defective heart at age one day, when Helen got really depressed - for about 3 years.

C. Jim2 thinks this might be around Sauvies Island. A lake in a hilly terrain.

D. This is Jack and Jim in early 1942 with Bobbie Burke at the Riverton Heights house. Not sure who is the girl. That's our 1941 Chevrolet.

E. Dad with Jack and brother Jim. Here dad looks unhappy, even angry. Late 1942. For mother to include these unhappy expressions (see also picture B on this page) is almost certainly deliberate. Marriage is a terrible thing.
  A. Gary Nelson with his sister Margie, brother Bill who died in childhood, neighbor boy with sailor hat, Jack, and Jim.
  A. Jimmie Truher with Bobbie Burke (Milo's son from 1st wife), 1936, near what might be grandmother Kate Burke's house.

B. Jim2 as courtier, taken at grandmother Kate Burkes's 73rd Street, Los Angeles house. The play was presented at St. Elizabeth's school.

C. Altadena house of Jim & Helen Truher, prehaps 1945.
  A. Uncharacteristic for mother to be caught and preserve such a cough, standing next to Leo (Glen) Burke, probably 1946. Kate Burke, with Edna makes three of her children here.

B. Three Truher boys. Michael at about 7 months.

C. Jim & Jack (looking unhappy to be dressed for church).

D. Jack(?) in the snow about 1949.

  Jim Truher as 9th grader at Eliot Jr High School.
• text modifications in progress
• THESE FACTS ARE CORRECT; TRANSFER INTO BODY OF HBTalbum_

This station is probably earliest, perhaps 1910.
1.
http://home.earthlink.net/~truher/genealogy/burke/KathrynMurphyBurke/ScenicWashStateRail.jpg

========================================================================

Photos of Kathryn Burke on trip to Scenic, 1938

The Scenic mountain low-cost housing scene with Kathryn Burke holding Jack as sleepy baby is from 1938.
Scenic, Wash, 1938, Jack Truher's grandmother, Catherine Murphy Burke, with grandchildren Jimmie and baby Jack
2.
http://home.earthlink.net/~truher/genealogy/burke/KathrynMurphyBurke/HBT_PA1_16_txt_DR.jpg

========================================================================

Kathryn Burke with boys, Jim and Jack Truher, 1943
3.
http://home.earthlink.net/~truher/genealogy/burke/KathrynMurphyBurke/KathrynMaryMurphyBurke_90KB.jpg

========================================================================

Historical text about Kathryn Murphy Burke,
4.
http://home.earthlink.net/~truher/genealogy/burke/KathrynMurphyBurke/KathrynBurke_GryBstTxt120KB.jpg

========================================================================

Descendants of James and Kathryn Burke
5.
http://home.earthlink.net/~truher/genealogy/burke/KathrynMurphyBurke/James_Burke_Data_Sheet_2000.jpg

========================================================================

Genealogy as from Helen Burke Truher, 1965.
6.
http://home.earthlink.net/~truher/genealogy/burke/KathrynMurphyBurke/Burke_History_HBTtxtWeb.jpg

========================================================================
 Save this text for PA12

At: <
http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/HBT-PA1-wComment.html >http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/HBT-PA1-wComment.html

Jack had written "Mother often commended dad for working so diligently to make the apartment over the 803 garage ready for Grandmother Burke. That was very important to mother, who took primary responsibility for her mother in old age. On the apartment, I recall that Jim2 did the framing and sheeting, but I wasn't involved in the early construction. Later in the finishing stages, I spent what seemed like a thousand hours as fetch helper in that apartment while dad installed the doors and cabinets, etc. While these were not jovial encounters,I learned a lot about what it takes to do that kind of work. Pop would sometimes become unreasonable -- preparing me to tolerate and cultivate all the cantankerous but productive coworkers I have known since."

Jim replies: I remember being the carpenter and holleree at the apartment over the grarage and that your “two years before the mast” were next door building an entire house. I worked on every element of the apartment construction from foundation to roof sheeting.  Except for the brick laying, the worst part was nailing the hardwood floors by hand then sanding the floor to perfection.  Dad brought in professionals for electrical wiring and plumbing. I recall doing all the rest with morning, evening and weekend under loud & critical supervision. One of the most interesting projects was the construction of the reinforced concrete beam over the automobile entrance to the garage. I have often thought that it was designed to withstand a 10 megaton nuclear blast in the front yard."

Jack adds: "I was assistant for various details to the carpenter (dad) while he did the doors and cabinet work, finishing, staining, varnishing. I was pressed to hold parts for nailing and screwing, endless, fetch tools, etc. All the heavy work that you did earlier was when I was too young to be much good for anything. When big brother left, then there was need for somebody to run for pieces. Much of this time, grandma Burke was actually resting in the bedroom part of the Apartment. All I remember now is the bedroom and living room. I don't remember where the toilet was, nor the kitchenette, but there must have been such because, after Gramma Burke died, when I was in high school, there was a couple living in there. What I remember most is that I would rather have been someplace else. It's puzzled me since that, given that clumsy introduction, I actually learned to prefer working on such crafts, mostly alone, rather than all the social situations that made me uncomfortable. It led to experimental physics because I had a sense of competence in adapting to building and using equipment."
• HBT Photo Album PA1 √ Jim2-Jack 1930s-1940s (pics and text)
• Jack Looks up Google on "Big Four Inn" & "Washington" on google:

Mountain Loop Highway a golden gateway to hiking

same url: http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/getaways/4931_hike09.shtml


Big Four Inn,
An Exclusive Hide-Away

Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest - Darrington Ranger District

http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/mbs/about/drd.shtml

First known as Trout's Marsh homestead, Big Four Mountain lured the industrious Rucker brothers to cash in on the exquisite scenery and construct an elaborate 50-room, three-story hotel in 1920. Tennis courts, a nine-hole golf course, and an artificial lake completed the grand scene for thousands of guests who arrived by railroad every summer. Today, only the chimney and sidewalks remain of the Inn, which burned to the ground in September 1949. However, the meadow, beaver ponds, and picnic area still attract thousands of recreationists who wish to enjoy the history and outstanding scenery that tempted the Rucker brothers many years ago.
• The Big Four Inn was home to the wandering Truher family at Silverton was on the lowlands below Mount Rainier. JWT2 adds that Big Four Inn was on a gentle downhill slope of Mount Rainer. The Inn burned down in 1946.

From: "James W. Truher"
Date: Tue, 22 Oct 2002 13:46:30 -0700

The Big Four Inn was on the road that went through Silverton. And Yea! That little rickety swaying wooden bridge across the river scared the hell out of me and made me afraid of high places until I was in my 40s!!!!

same URL
http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/Silverton_BigFourInnColor.jpg

James W. Truher "Great stuff, pictures that I don't recall seeing
. I have visited Silverton in recent years to see if what I remember is accurate. The population is now 25 (I recall hearing from mom that is was 50+ when we were there) and I believe there is a photo somewhere that includes most of the women and children who lived there in the late 30’s. "
this addendum: January 23, 2004
• virtual page Silverton
 No Phone Service Still for Silverton, Washington

email from JWT2 on 2002m0922

The below was written in May 1999, about 60 years after we lived there!

A recent New York Times article reminds us that in America some communities still don't have telephone service, and won't have, until some basic economic principles change or some corporations have a change of heart.

Less than 65 miles from Seattle, the high tech capitol of the Northwest, tiny Silverton, Washington, sits in the shadow of high mountains and low ambition. No phone service or 911, just a police radio to call for help. That is, when the people who have the police radio are home to work it. Too expensive for a teleco to run a cable. Too costly for a wireless link.

How many other communities in America are like this? Many people throughout the west are off the electrical grid and the PSTN deliberately, since they build houses where no utility lines exist. But that's a different thing than a town, no matter how small, having never had phone service at all.

http://www.privateline.com/Newsletters/PLNews4b.html
 Still -- No phone service at Silverton in 2001
Thursday, November 29, 2001


By <mailto:mikelewis@seattlepi.com >

MIKE LEWIS

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER


This 2001 story is available online, complete with graphics.

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/48616_phones29.shtml

SILVERTON -- Invariably the question comes. While buying cassette tapes at Radio Shack or applying for a credit card. When writing a check for two weeks' worth of groceries after a 20-mile drive to the store or when meeting a new friend.

image

Diane Boyd knows it will be asked, so sometimes she lies.

"How do you tell people you don't have a phone number?" she wondered, smiling. "They always look at you funny, like you are from another planet. So sometimes I just make one up."

For 13 years, Boyd has wanted a phone number. She just can't have one -- yet. Neither can the 50 other residents of Silverton, a former silver and copper mining village surrounded by the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest.

In one of the most-wired states in the nation, a place where Internet access is considered a Gates-given right, Silverton remains one of the largest communities in the state -- and one of a few in the country -- without phone service.

No cell phones. No Internet. Not even a late-night wrong number.

But with a little luck, a fast snowmelt and a willing Seattle company, residents next summer will get the opportunity to screen calls from relatives, enjoy dinnertime interruptions and download e-mail spam.

They'll also be able to call 911, check on their families, look for jobs and, finally, stop lying to the counter help in electronics stores.

"It isn't asking too much," said Boyd, a U.S. Forest Service employee who lives here year round. "You see these commercials with some company bragging about Internet access in Katmandu, and I can't even make a call from Silverton, Washington."

Bob Shirley, a telecommunications analyst for the state's Utilities and Transportation Commission who has helped other remote Washington towns without phone service find willing companies, secure financing and run lines, called the situation, "unusual."


image
 
Gulf War veteran Jay Murray places a flag near the driveway to his family's home in Silverton. The town is scheduled to receive phone service next summer. Paul Joseph Brown / Seattle Post-Intelligencer



<
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/photos/photo.asp?PhotoID=7405

Click for larger photo


And even though the state and federal governments have programs to encourage "universal access," some towns still fall through the cracks.

"That is what has happened with Silverton," Shirley said. "It you are in a world without telephones, I guess it wouldn't be a big deal, but here it makes you a bit of an odd ball."

That oddball status could soon end.

Joel Eisenberg, founder of Seattle-based International Telecom LTD, learned about Silverton's plight and founded Beaver Creek Telephone Co.

A project too small to interest the large carriers in Washington's $3 billion phone market, Beaver Creek is small enough to want the low profit in spending roughly $1 million to run a fiber-optic cable from Silverton into the nearest phone line, a GTE cable that ends at a Verlot pay phone 11 miles west of town.

For Boyd and the 20 or so full-time residents of Silverton, the $50 monthly bill can't come soon enough.

She and her husband, Denny, run the town's telecommunications link to the outside world: a Forest Service emergency phone that sits in a corner of their enclosed porch.

If the Boyds aren't home when someone's house catches on fire or when one of the thousands of motorists who pass by on the Mountain Loop Highway breaks down, the only other options are the 20-minute serpentine drive to the nearest pay phone or a 4,500-foot hike up Mount Forgotten, where, legend has it, a cell phone can find a signal on a clear day.

"The radio has gotten us this far," she said of what has passed for an emergency phone for decades. "But I don't think anyone is going to miss it much. It's a long time coming."

'Two longs and a short'

Founded in the folds of Silver Gulch in August of 1891, Silverton boomed over the next two years with 300 residents, a post office, two general stores, a saloon and a printing office.

But by 1911, Silverton began to fade. From 300 to 200 residents, then 150 over the next 20 years. The post office closed. So did the hotel and one of the stores.

As more and more dial tones hummed across the rest of the nation, Silverton residents remained free of outside phone contact. So did much of rural America.

In 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Communications Act to put an affordable phone in every home. American Telephone & Telegraph was allowed to charge expensive long-distance rates to help bring low-cost local phone service to the masses.

It worked. In 1934, one third of American homes had a phone. By 1980, 90 percent did. In a way, Silverton joined the forward march, thanks to Clarence Murray, its resident tinkerer. A master machinist who hand-built precision oceanographic measuring instruments, Murray was the town handyman and de facto mayor.

Murray, who bought the first in what would be a series of rustic homes along Highway 92 and the Stillaguamish River, wanted residents to be able to reach each other without the required hike between homes.

So he installed an Army surplus, hand-crank party-line phone system, similar to those found in many small towns then. Except this one lacked outside contact.

When she moved to town in 1983, Diane Boyd's Silverton phone still worked. With old party lines, every phone is wired to the next. You only answered it, she explained, when you heard your ring (except for eavesdropping, of course).

"Two longs and a short," she said, recalling hers. A continual ring meant an emergency, and everyone picked up.

But in a self-contained party-line system, when one phone goes down they all do. Silverton's system hasn't worked for a decade. Then, as now, anything serious meant also using the emergency radio and contact with Robe, Verlot or Granite Falls.

As the nation became increasingly connected in the late 1980s, Silverton slid backward.

Deregulation hurt -- and helped

When the breakup of AT&T began in 1983, the seven regional companies created didn't have the large pot of long-distance money to wire up remote places.

Moreover, the ensuing free market competition removed the incentive to build a low-profit project for a handful of people, so much of the work to wire remote towns stopped.

In 1996, Congress responded and set up the universal access fund, which essentially repays the cost of running phone lines to remote places, allowing companies to keep the profit from the ongoing service fees.

Because these places generally have fewer than 100 customers, many of the large companies, such as nearby GTE, didn't want to bother.

Washington phone regulators solicited bids anyway and even looked at the possibility of forcing companies to accept the Silverton project, and projects for Hobart near Issaquah and Stehekin on Lake Chelan.

Eventually, phone companies did step forward, and many communities are expected to have phones within a year or two. In Silverton, Brett Boyd, Diane's son, says he'll believe in phone service when he hears it.

He points to Beaver Creek, which successfully bid for the rights in 1999, but has delayed the project a couple of times.

And Boyd and others worry a little that the 80-acre town will change with the phone service. Property values will rise. The lack of phones and outside electricity -- many homeowners have their own generators and propane heat -- kept away big-money vacation homes from the narrow valley, where coho salmon spawn in the river next to the highway and granite peaks dominate the vertical horizon like skyscrapers.

"There is a little concern," said Brett Boyd. "But the benefits outweigh that."

So one more lonely winter to go for Silverton.

The coming snow and inability to chat at a distance makes the town and valley so lonely and isolated that in decades past, emergency radio operators used to all get on air Saturday nights for sing-alongs.

Phones have silenced the other towns' radios. And today's sheriff's deputies don't sing.

The Boyds, the Murrays and others can't wait for radio silence here, too. Diane wants to call family first. So does Denny. Brett laughed and said he'd finally be able to call in sick.

Silverton will get its first pay phone, too. Soon after -- its first jammed coin slot.


P-I reporter Mike Lewis can be reached at 206-448-8140 or <
mailto:mikelewis@seattlepi.com >mikelewis@seattlepi.com

• Brother Jim found a map which includes Silverton, Scenic, and Wenatchee (upper left in sequence to lower right on map). All of these place were major stopping points on the tour of Truher family adventures from 1934 - 1941.

same url: http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/SilvertonScenic-Wenatchee-uL-Lr.png
• Brother Jim believes he recognizes some of the photos in this album as from Silverton, which Jim remembers, but I do not. So I had to find another HBT album in the house for a better picture of Silverton. Here's what we have around the house and on the web.

From: "JBT"
Sent: Tuesday, October 22, 2002 1:06 PM
Subject: Silverton

"Jim, as you asked, I found a Silverton, Washington State
photo . It's not in this album, but I've put a copy here anyway"

same url:
http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/Silverton_BigFourInnColor.jpg
• Saturday, January 29, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA10 Jim2 1934-1952 + 1970s Pac Bell
• album page HBT_PA10_08
 Open and view the text associated with each of the album pictures on each page by clicking on the (+) bullet point symbol at left of each line below. This opens up a block of text. Close this text when you are ready to open text for a different page.
 View this album's text and pictures together online by first setting up this text outline format web page window to fill the left third , or less, of your monitor viewing area. Leave it open. Click on any of the page links below, which should open a second web window for viewing the album pictures. Set this new window size to fill the right two thirds of your monitor viewing space. Navigate over this right window using the right and bottom border controls to find individual pictures on the page. When you select a new page link, you will replace the page in the right-window.
 There is hidden text throughout this document. Watch for bullet points with (+) inside. To maintain viewing contact with the entire album, this album contains compressed bullet points with (+) sign inside, which should be clicked-on for more detail. When all text is shown, uncompressed (-), a minus sign is in the bullet point. See for example HBT_PA_07, where pictures A and D contain compressed text.
• Click on the (+) bullet point at left
 album page HBT_PA10_01
 album page HBT_PA10_02
• album page HBT_PA10_03
• album page HBT_PA10_04
• album page HBT_PA10_05
• album page HBT_PA10_06
• album page HBT_PA10_07
 View each album page without text by clicking on any one of highlighted links below,
e.g. page HBT_PA_02
• Friday, January 28, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA1 √ Jim2-Jack 1930s-1940s (pics and text)
  Picture A. Jimmie with Helen Truher.

Picture B. Rear entrance and backyard of father JWT1's first serious home building project, the little Riverton Heights house.

Picture C. Two pairs of boys with mothers. Babies Michael Marcks and Jackie Truher, with 3 years olds John Marcks and JWT2 Truher.

Picture D. JWT2 with unknown child. Looks like Silverton, Jim or Scenic?

Picture E. Marcks and Truher boys with young pair at about 6-8 months, almost walking.

Picture F. JWT2 at age 3.

Picture G. New babies Jack at left, William Marcks at right, held by our mothers.
 More of the Helen Truher - Helen Marcks connection. Our mother Helen Truher felt very isolated as a young mother, and somewhat berated by her grandmother Nellie Truher for being too uppity, i.e. think about working for money.

In child-birth with JWT2, Helen Truher's Seattle Providence Hospital room-mate was Helen Marcks, a chatty and bright and enthusiastic new mother who would live in Portland, with the Marcks bakery in Gresham (I think), where Uncle Dan and Aunt Marie lives.. So these young women were likely both to have cohort children and to live near each other at times. Lots to share.

Add dad's obsession with driving to Seattle, and the nice stopping point in Portland, and a long term relationship was facilitated for many years.

I've looked on the web for Marcks names in Portland. There are some, but no relatives or descendants as yet.
•  Picture A. Baby Jack with brother Jim.

Picture B. unknown woman

Picture C. unknown man with baby girl.

Picture D. Farmland in Wenatchee perhaps.

Picture E. JWT2

Picture F. Helen and Jimmie Truher. Woman may be grandmother Kate Burke; not clear.

Picture G. Jackie at perhaps 3 months old with Jimmie standing guard.

Picture H. Perhaps the Scenic Rail yard. A couple years ago, I found this Scenic Railroad scene which I labeled and remember as from a website about Scenic. Also notice that the building at left of this Scenic Railroad depot has a sign which ends in "enic". We may assume that elements of the Truher family used this train regularly, as did Truher visitors. Comparing this Picture G with the URL of this paragraph shows the same steep hills.

same URL: http://home.earthlink.net/~truher/genealogy/burke/KathrynMurphyBurke/ScenicWashStateRail.jpg
 August Truher's Elgin Pocket Watch came into possession of JWT1 and then JWT2. Jim found early 1900s catalog ; this from his email as follows:

"I have our GF Truher’s 19-jewel Elgin gold pocket watch that was made in 1912 (I think based on a number on the movement) and used when he was a railroad conductor. It still works like a fine pocket watch should. It is displayed in a glass bell on the top of my dresser and is shown as the center watch in the photo below. The warranty is no good anymore since it expired after 20 years. There are several etched indications of maintenance activities on the inside of the back cover that easily screws off."

same URL http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/ElginRailroadWatch-AugustTruher.jpg

Elgin URL
http://elginwatches.org/scans/sales_catalogs/1917_Oskamp-Nolting/m_pg_E3.html
• Wednesday, January 26, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA1 √ Jim2-Jack 1930s-1940s (pics and text)
  Picture A. Scenic

Picture B & E. Grandmother Kate Burke holding baby Jack, with two other young mothers and their babies. Seems a strange coincidence, so many babies of identical age in such a small community.

Brother Jim writes, "The house we lived in at Scenic was built long before we moved in. It was two stories – the second story was really an attic for sleeping. It was the house that had a bear on the back porch raiding the ice box. "

Picture C. Grandmother Burke with baby Jack and 3 year old Jimmie.

Picture D. Jimmie is 2nd from left, but no other Truher-Burke family here. The woman at left appears elsewhere in this album (yet to search).

Picture E & B. Identical picture. Perhaps Helen was making this album from copies, and didn't notice.
  Picture A. Kate Burke centered between the two windows. JWT2 may be just to our left of Kate.

Picture B. Jimmie Truher with John Marcks on Sauvies Island (per JWT2, 2005).
  Picture A. JWT1 (smoking pipe) & JWT2, on what appears to be a morning jaunt.

Picture B. Helen Truher and Jimmie are inside the car. The house behind car is August and Nellie Truher's Riverton Heights home. This is a pretty nice house for a 1940 working man, the result of August's nearly four decades as a railroad conductor. Close inspection of the film photograph indicates the man standing beside the car is not JWT1. Perhaps it is Mr. Coyle again, looking very business-like.

Picture C. Jimmie and Jack standing beside the new family 1941 Chevrolet sedan. Jack remembers riding in this car, to include the long journey to LA.

Picture D. Baby Jack Truher behind with another of same age being held by unidentified woman. The woman is not Helen Marcks, who can be found on this album, picture 19C.
 JBT would not know the first name of Helen Marcks, nor how how to spell the second name. But Jack has a copy of HBT's personal address book, which JWT1 copied after HBT death. From that copied photo is most likely that Helen Marcks remarried to become Helen Hood of 3255 S W Evergreen Lane, Portland, Oregon 97201 (1-503-223-1049 Jack called - disconnected 2005). Also possible that this Helen Marcks-Hood was daughter of the mother, but Jack thinks this is unlikely.

The copy that dad made of this address book is worth comment. This was after mother died. I thought the book was perhaps 26 pages, as the alphabet. I asked dad to make me a copy of that book, thinking he would just copy a couple dozen pages and mail it to me.

When the copy arrived I saw it was a carefully created duplicate of a more elaborate original than I expected. Dad's copy for me was in a red loose leaf binder of many pages which stack to 5/8th of an inch thick. Each page is cut to about 5" x 9" with punched holes. He had to have copied each page, cute each page three times for size, punched the pages with three holes. He added dividers for each letter. The letter "M" is 28 pages. It was an enormous job.

Dad never acted as if this response was remarkable, nor did I. I thanked him.
  Picture E. Jack's guess is that this is JWT2 overlooking creekside workman on Sauvies Island. There appears to be a larger river in background, reinforcing the guess that this is watery Sauvies Island near Portland.

Picture F. JWT2 with unidentified girl.

Picture G. Baby Jack, likely in mother HBT's arms.

Picture H. JWT2 pulling wagon with child of woman who recurrently appears in this album.
• Monday, January 24, 2005
• Thomas Burke Descendant's Report from Lori Manning, RAA, JBT √
 Thomas Burke Descendants, per Lori Manning (previously Lori Berg), Wisconsin Burke volunteer genealogist

My outline descendant tree:
Descendants of Thomas Burke
1 Thomas Burke b: Abt. 1831 in County of Tipprary in the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland d: 02 Apr 1883 in Dayton Twp., Richland Co., WI
.. +Catharine Stapleton b: Mar 1833 in Ireland m: 28 Jun 1857 in Layfayette, Tippecanoe Co., IN d: 03 Sep 1908 in Dayton Twp., Richland Co., WI Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #211
........ 2 Patrick Burke
........ 2 Hannora Burke b: 10 Apr 1858 in Indiana d: 07 Mar 1883
............ +Patrick Manning b: Abt. 05 Sep 1848 in New Jersey d: 04 Sep 1917 in Eagle Twp., Richland Co., WI Burial: 06 Sep 1917 Muscoda Cemetery, Grant Co., WI
.................. 3 Kate Manning b: 27 Apr 1877 in Eagle Twp., Richland Co., WI
.................. 3 Timothy Theron Manning b: 07 Jul 1878 in Orion, Richland Co., WI d: 18 Apr 1937 in Dayton Twp., Richland Co., WI Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richland Center, WI
...................... +Lydia Mae Leffler b: 04 Aug 1886 in Hartford City/Musiny, Indiana m: 14 Jan 1904 d: 09 Jul 1959 in Richland Hospital, Richland Center, WI Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richland Center, WI
........ 2 Judith Burke b: Abt. 1860
........ 2 Thomas Frances Burke b: 1861 in Indiana d: 1936 Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #211
............ +Etta Florence Briggs b: Oct 1875 in WI m: 1895 d: 1960 Burial: Fancy Creek
.................. 3 Oscar Leo Burke b: 10 Jan 1895 d: Sep 1962
.................. 3 Mary G. Burke b: 01 May 1897 d: 06 Jan 1972
...................... +Albert Jansky m: 1934 in Richland Co., WI
.................. 3 Clarence Burke b: 22 May 1902 d: 01 Jan 1969 Burial: Fancy Creek
...................... +Margaret (Burke) b: 1915 Burial: Fancy Creek
.................. 3 Freda G. Burke b: 18 Jul 1908
...................... +Louis Marshall
.................. *2nd Husband of Freda G. Burke:
...................... +Troy Beighly m: 11 Jun
.................. 3 Donald L. Burke b: 19 Oct 1914
...................... +Esther Hoopengardner m: 20 Oct 1943
........ 2 James Burke, Sr. b: Abt. Mar 1865 in Indiana d: Oct 1924
............ +Catharine 'Kate' Murphy b: Dec 1871 in IL m: Abt. 06 Nov 1888 d: Aft. Oct 1924
.................. 3 Leo Glen Burke b: Apr 1890 in WI d: 1964 Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #122
...................... +Mayme J. Stedele b: 1895 in WI d: 1967 Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #122
.................. 3 James Burke b: Mar 1894 in WI d: Bef. Oct 1924
.................. 3 Edna M. Burke b: Abt. 1902 d: Bef. Oct 1924
.................. 3 Milo F. Burke b: Abt. 1905 d: Bef. Oct 1924
........ 2 Margaret 'Marge' Burke b: Abt. 1866
........ 2 Bridget Burke b: Abt. 1868
........ 2 John Burke b: 1870 in WI d: 1941 Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #211
............ +Hannah M. O'Keefe b: 1871 in Ireland d: 1949 Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #211
.................. 3 Thomas F. Burke b: 1907 in WI d: 21 Jul 1956 Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #68
...................... +Marie B. Nicks b: 14 Aug 1916 in Richland Center, Richland Co., WI m: 1936 in Rockford, IL d: 29 Feb 1996 in St. Joseph's Hospital Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #68
.................. 3 Agnes C. Burke b: 22 Apr 1910 in Dayton Twp., Richland Co., WI d: 19 Dec 1980 in Pine Valley Nursing Home, Richland Co., WI Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI - North C
.................. 3 James Burke, Jr. b: 02 Nov 1911 d: 02 Nov 1911 Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #211 (no marker)
........ 2 Michael Burke b: Abt. Sep 1877 in WI d: 13 Jun 1911 Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #211
............ +Rose Josephine Harris b: 23 Mar 1879 in WI m: 27 Nov 1902 in Richland County, WI d: 25 Nov 1947 in Eagle Twp., Basswood, Richland Co., WI Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #211
.................. 3 Gertrude Hazel Burke b: Abt. 1903 d: Bef. Aug 1994
...................... +Michael Hartnett m: 1920 in Richland County, WI
.................. 3 Harold M. Burke b: 1905 d: 1968 Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #9
...................... +Anastasia Moore b: 1906 d: 1966 Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #9
.................. *2nd Wife of Harold M. Burke:
...................... +Barbara Sinnett-Emshoff m: Oct 1967
.................. 3 Rolland Burke b: 22 Jan 1907 d: 08 Sep 1971 Burial: Basswood Cemetery
...................... +Mary Cavanaugh
.................. *2nd Wife of Rolland Burke:
...................... +Lela L. Anderson b: 1910 m: 1925 d: 24 Dec 1968 Burial: Basswood Cemetery
.................. 3 Leo Raymond Burke b: 1910 d: 23 Aug 1994 Burial: St. Mary's Cemetery, Richand Center, WI #211
.................. 3 Myron J. Burke b: Abt. 1912 d: 22 Apr 1947
It looks like my dates for Edna and Milo must be wrong. I must have figured out their death dates by someone else's obituary. I'll have to look into that later. Many of our dates are the same or mighty close. Sometimes you have more info and sometimes I do. I'll have to get my papers out later. -- Lori
• Thomas Burke, Tale of, by Ron Haack √
• The Tale of Thomas Burke:

Ron Haack:

separate chart
http://www.mickey-cookie.whsites.com/family_tree/james_burke_descend-full.htm

Here is a stripped down report on Thomas Burke. It shows who was born when and which state. It sort of jibes with Lori's tree, except she has more names. This and her data show Indiana births before, during and after the Civil War (there was a lull from 12/22/1861 to 3/6/1964), and then a transition to Wisconsin somewhere around 1869.

Descendants of Thomas Burke
Generation No. 1
1. THOMAS2 BURKE (JAMES1)1 was born 1831 in Bally Griffen, County Tipperary, Ireland1,2, and died April 02, 1883 in Richland Center, Wisconsin3. He married CATHERINE STAPLETON3 June 27, 1857 in Tippecanoe County Indiana4, daughter of PATRICK STAPLETON and ?. She was born 1835 in Bally Griffen, Tipperary County, Ireland5, and died September 03, 1908 in Richland Center, Wisconsin5.
Children of THOMAS BURKE and CATHERINE STAPLETON are:
i. H
ANNORAH3 BURKE5, b. 1859, Dayton, Tippecanoe County Indiana5; m. PATRICK MANNING5.
ii. T
HOMAS BURKE5, b. December 22, 1861, Dayton, Tippecanoe County Indiana5; d. November 19, 1936, Marshall, Wisconsin5; m. ETTA BRIGGS5, February 26, 1895, Richland Center, Wisconsin5.
iii. J
AMES DANIEL BURKE6, b. March 06, 1864, Lafayette, Tippecanoe County, Indiana6; d. October 15, 1924, Torrence, California6; m. CATHERINE MARY MURPHY, November 06, 1888, Richland Center, Wisconsin6; b. November 13, 1871, Chicago, Illinois6; d. August 1955, Altadena, California6.
iv. M
ARGARET BURKE7, b. 1868, Dayton, Tippecanoe County Indiana7; d. September 22, 1933, Chicago, Illinois7; m. JOHN O'KEEFE7, Abt. 1899, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois7.
v. J
OHN BURKE7, b. November 14, 1870, Dayton Township, Richland County Wisconsin7; d. January 04, 1944, Richland Center, Wisconsin7; m. HANNAH O'KEEFE7, 1906, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois7.
vi. P
ATRICK BURKE7, b. May 14, 1873, Richland Center, Wisconsin7; d. June 13, 1911, Eagle Township, Richland County Wisconsin7; m. ELIZABETH BURTON7.
vii. M
ICHAEL FRANCIS BURKE7, b. September 18, 1877, Richland Center, Wisconsin7; d. June 13, 1911, Eagle Township, Richland County Wisconsin7; m. ROSE HARRIS7, November 27, 1902, Richland Center, Wisconsin7.
Endnotes
1. Thomas Burke Data Sheet by Helen Kathryn Burke, EdD, handwritten, about 1980, Burke, Thomas, General List of Family Data, is attached to Thomas Burke Scrapbook.
2. Naturalization Petition, Thomas Burke, October 11, 1858, Citizenship Papers, (County Room Brewer Library, given by Helen Sandenof Edgerton, WI), "To the Judge of the Tippecanoe Circuit Court, In theState of Indiana: Thomas Burk Being an Alien, and a free white person,makes the following report of himself: upon his solemn oath declaresthat he is aged 27 years; that he was born in the County of Tippraray inthe Kingdom of Great Britain & Ireland that he emigrated from Liverpoolin the year one thousand eight hundred and forty two; that he arrived inthe United States at the City of Baltimore in the State of Maryland onthe 29 day of September eighteen hundred and forty two that he owesallegiance to Victoria Queen of Great Britain & Ireland and that it isbona fide his intention to become a citizen of the United States ofAmerica, and to renounce forever allegiance and fidelity to any foreignprince, potentate, state or sovereignty whatever; and particularly toVictoria Queen as ? of whom he is a subject. Sworn to and Subscribed,Before me, on the 11 day of October A.D. 1858, William ? Ellis ClerkC.C."In this petition in 1858, Thomas Burke states that he is 27 years old, which would put his birth year as about 1831, which differs from the first source oh Helen Burke Truher. This second source appears to be more reliable..
3. Thomas Burke Data Sheet by Helen Kathryn Burke, EdD, handwritten, about 1980, Burke, Thomas, General List of Family Data, is attached to Thomas Burke Scrapbook.
4. Marriage Certificate of Thomas Burke and Catherine Stapleton, Marriage Certificate, (County Room Brewer Library, given by Helen Sandenof Edgerton, WI), Thomas Burk and Catherine Stapleton married June 27,1857 in the state if Indiana, Tippecanoe County..
5. Thomas Burke Data Sheet by Helen Kathryn Burke, EdD, handwritten, about 1980, Burke, Thomas, General List of Family Data, is attached to Thomas Burke Scrapbook.
6. James Burke Data Sheet by Helen Kathryn Burke, EdD, handwritten, about 1980, Burke, James, General List of Family Data, is attached to James Burke Scrapbook.
7. Thomas Burke Data Sheet by Helen Kathryn Burke, EdD, handwritten, about 1980, Burke, Thomas, General List of Family Data, is attached to Thomas Burke Scrapbook.

• Thomas Burke + Catherine Stapleton, Wedding Certificate, 1857 √
• Here is a hand written copy of the 1857 State of Indiana Wedding Certificate for Thomas Burke and Catherine Stapleton. I believe this was received from Mrs. Marylou Burke, wife of Joe Burke (Leo [Glen] Burke's son), now living at 2324 W. Calle Zamora, AZ 85710

same URL:
http://gene.truher.net/burk/dotMacBurk/scan/BurkeThomas-Stapleton-WedCert.jpg
• Sunday, January 23, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA1 √ Jim2-Jack 1930s-1940s (pics and text)
  picture G. Another unidentified woman in unidentified location.
•  picture F3. Brother Jim wrote, "this is the one room shack that dad built on Sauvies Island, although it looks slightly larger than I remember. The thumbnail picture below is the house that dad built in a day at Sauvies Island. Dad standing with an unidentified woman. What I do remember is the privy outside, the porch was the stump of a tree about the size of the felled tree in the photo, a room divider made of a rope and blanket, and starting school a short distance away in a 2 room school house with 4 grades in each room, eating a real mud pie with sugar given to me by two mean little girls."

image

www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/HBT_PA1_05web.jpg

Other of Jim's report follow:

From: "James W. Truher"
Subject: "House" where Jack and I lived summer/fall in 1940.
Date: Fri, 18 Oct 2002 19:26:25 -0700

"I started 1st grade in a 2 room school house while
living in this shack with Jack and parents. Sauvies Island then was reachable only by a 3 car, 150 yard ferry ride. Sauvies is a few miles N/W of Portland on the edge of the Columbia River. The porch was a tree stump and the toilet was an outside hole in the ground with a shed built around it behind the house. My memory is that Dad built this in a day, it was one room inside divided by a blanket hung from a clothes line inside."
==========================================================

Sent: Friday, October 18, 2002 4:51 PM
Subject: Jim & Helen Truher family, on road jobs

"Jim is looking for some scenes from Scenic, the mountain areas near Seattle when our dad was a highway superintendent for a small, contractor name Coyle (more eventually explained later in this book).

Jack adds here: From this album, PA1, here are the most likely pages I could find set the Scenic:
PA1_12 (A-E; not F), PA1-16 A, PA1_17 (A; less B), PA1_18 (all; less B & C)."

Brother Jim found a map which
includes Silverton, Scenic, and Wenatchee (upper left in sequence to lower right on map). All of these place were major stopping points on the tour of Truher family adventures from 1934 - 1941.

same url: http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/SilvertonScenic-Wenatchee-uL-Lr.png
• Saturday, January 22, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA1 √ Jim2-Jack 1930s-1940s (pics and text)
  Clarified by JTW2: "The house is the second one West of Gramercy on the North side of 73rd. In 2005 the house is in a rough district, but not the worst gangland. I drove by 6 mos ago. The property is newly painted, blue I think, well cared for with lots of black kids out in the neighborhood."

Jack asks: "
Did you ever hear the story of how they wound up with this 73rd street house? Mother (born Dec 23, 1910) went to high school in Monrovia. They all moved to LA not long before mother was ready to start high school. Her father died when she was 14. So far as I knew, nobody had any money for anything. Mother's father died of heart trouble inTorrance at age 60. They must have moved pretty quick from Torrance to Monrovia where mother went to high school.  

Jim responds: "They moved into a house on Foothill Boulevard in Monrovia when mom started high school and Grandma Burke moved to 73rd St. when mom was at UCLA. Don’t know how they paid for it, but there was the farm and much older brothers that may have helped."


  The property (originally 5 acres) actually begins on North side of 135th St. about 5 doors West of Military Road. There are 3 homes on the property along 135th with the 3rd one have been built between the original grandparents house and the house Dad built. On the rear (North) of the property there is now a grade school.

The location of the two houses I just sent is in South West Seattle in an area called Riverton Heights. It is in the 3000 block of 135th St a hundred yards or so East of Military Road.

Jim3 took these photos Friday while I visited him recently. The house that built was about 1/2 its present size when we lived there. Dad hand dug a basement under his parents house in return for the 1/4 acre on which he built our small house. The grand parents property was 5 acres surrounded by fields and trees.

 
picture B. The house at 245 Hillside Road that JWT1 and HBT built beginning about 1958, when Jack was away at Stanford. Michael was home at South Pasadena High School mostly and participated in the planning, and likely some considerable helping out.

 
picture B. Jimmie (JWT2) walking at about one year old in the backyard of Kate Burke's home.

picture C. Jimmie with characteristic enthusiasm, also at just over one year old.
 
picture E. JWT2 at about 18 months old, looking out a side, main floor, entrance of what I believe was the big house of August Truher on Queen Ann Hill in Seattle. JWT2 agrees that this is the old Queen Ann Hill victorian house. Jim told Jack in 2002 that this house had been demolished, along with many of its kind, to make room for multiples.

picture F. JWT2 at about 18 months old with his parents, on a different expedition. Father JWT1 appears thinner and less muscular than most other early pictures. JWT2 believes this photo may have been taken at the Riverton Heights home of grandparents before JWT1 built house there.
  The name of the small construction company was, Coyle Construction, after the owner. JWT1 worked for this small company as road construction superintendent and paymaster for perhaps 3 years, one of his most interesting work experiences. The relationship only ended when the company owner-manager and one or two others of his family were killed in small plane accident in Alaska. This trip was for bidding on a highway job there, perhaps the great Alaska highway. JWT1 was invited but chose not to go, thinking the flying plans too dangerous. [This is general story as repeated by HBT and JWT1.]
•  picture D. Jimmie at over two years old with his father, and two men. The man at left is Jack Coyle, dad's (JWT1's) construction company owner and boss for much of the era. The other man could be his son or, by appearance, his younger brother. JWT2 confirmed this independently after checking this picture online. Jack Coyle, and perhaps the other man, were killed on a bid trip to Alaska, ending my father's business relationship with that company, and the little company itself. I don't know what the work was in Alaska. It may have been the Great Alaska Highway , "built as a military road between 1942-44." It may be that Jack's parents' peculiar early compromise which named JBT as John Truher, but nicknamed as Jack Truher, was motivated by the respect appreciation that father JWT1 had for Jack Coyle. Emotional ties were not easy for my father to express. The name, John, was traceable to my mother's uncle John Burke. Michael Barrett Truher was named for my grandmother Helen Barrett (Nellie) Truher.

same link:
http://www.explorenorth.com/library/roads/alcan-signs.html
 There is hidden text throughout this document. Watch for bullet points with (+) inside. To maintain viewing contact with the entire album, this album contains compressed bullet points with (+) sign inside, which should be clicked-on for more detail. When all text is shown, uncompressed (-), a minus sign is in the bullet point. See for example HBT_PA_07, where pictures A and D contain compressed text.
  picture B. JWT1, August, and Lewis Truher. Note that Lewis appears to be dressed Greyhound Bus company uniform cloths. Lewis was manager of Greyhound station when in died.

picture C. JWT1, Nellie, August, May, Lewis Truher. My guess is that Helen Burke Truher took these pictures of family on August's Riverton Heights property.

picture D. Helen Nelson with Jimmie (JWT2), and Helen Truher. Not clear where this is. JWT2 said recently (2005) that he thinks this scene is probably in eastern or central Washington State.

picture E and F. Jimmie (JWT2) in same location of picture D.
• The property (originally 5 acres) actually begins on North side of 135th St. about 5 doors West of Military Road. JWT2 continues by email in 2001, there are 3 homes on the property along 135th with the 3rd one have been built between the original grandparents house and the house Dad built. On the rear (North) of the property there is now a grade school.

This paragraph is from an email exchange of JBT/JWT2 on July 4, 2001: "From about 1935-1940, August and Nellie lived at a 2 story property within steps of a tiny house my dad built on August's property including the tiny house at 3115 South 135 Street, Riverton Heights in 1937. August owned about 5 acres there, then only had his house and the little one my dad built for us. The little house was sold about 1945, and probably the larger house about the same time. This Riverton Heights location is now in the flight path, very near, and just north of the main Seattle-Tacoma Airport. The little house is still there, but it has been added-onto so it is more than twice the size my father built originally." JWT2 and JWT3 have seen within the last couple of years, the little house that he and I lived in in Riverton Heights. Additions have doubled its size.

JWT2 wrote me on Nov 25, 2001: "Dad hand dug a basement under his parents' house in return for the 1/4 acre on which he built our small house. The grand parents property was 5 acres surrounded by fields and trees."

I don't have records or knowledge of August and Nellie's residence after about 1945. Somewhere in Seattle until Nellie died; then August moved briefly to Altadena and then to Hawaii where he died with his oldest daughter.

 Edna was always an enthusiastic traveler. The big smile of presumed Kate is uncharacteristic of how we knew her as elderly. It seems a younger person - but the dress, the hair style, the body are otherwise so close to the other pictures here, it must be Kate. Yes, look at the accentuated collar of the dress, an unusual feature. It appears also in picture C. so thanks Grandma Burke, for that big smile. We can even see the high toothy smile and basic facial lines of her daughter, Helen. What was she laughing about. No matter, Edna had a sense of irony, appreciation for something silly. Edna was a school teacher too, and a good one. In her later years, she was off with Don on various trips: Egypt, Europe. Until his asthma got the best of him. When Edna died, mother Helen shared none of it with me. I wrote Don Nasby a letter about 1962, shortly before he died. He wrote back. We saw a lot of Don as Edna visited with Helen often. We got used to them. Don was always quiet, calm, thoughtful, unpretentious. A really pleasant fellow. He taught me that men don't have to be gorillas, which I might have concluded if I extrapolated only from JWT1's at his worst.
  picture F. "Yosemite our camp July 1936". Jack is persuaded this is our grandmother, Kate Burke, in photo taken by Edna returning from visit to Washington State in the car of picture C on this page.
 Mona was unusual in that she had inherited money and was relatively rich even in college, so she had time and money to travel. Mona became schizophrenic in later life, though she was able to live at home for many years in a fancy Pasadena house, first with her parents and later alone. The last time, Jack saw her was on Morada place about 1947, when she was running around, calling out delusionally, on the street. She had to be subdued, perhaps by police. In later life, I have her in a picture with other elderly friends of my mother.
  Picture E. HBT's sorority sister, Mona, with an unknown woman and baby, with JWT2 standing at age 3.5. (more text at (+))
•  Picture D. Brother Jim thinks this is himself with grandmother Burke and mother Helen at Silverton , in Snohomish County , Washington State. Note the steep hill in background.
 Kate Burke was probably visiting her brother on way to see her daughter's family in Seattle. Uncle Dan Murphy had owned one of the many hotel-tavern's in Chicago catering to the Irish immigrants there, until he and Aunt Marie move to Gresham, perhaps in 1920s? Jack recalls visiting a small professional center for a half-dozen physicians or dentists. Uncle Dan was a small scale, commercial property developer, among whatever else he did. Uncle Dan's house was, comfortable with a basement where Jim & I stacked fire wood one memorable day. There was an upstairs bedroom, wherein son Danny Murphy had a 1930s style phonograph that played mostly pop songs of the day.
  Picture A. Mother Helen Truher happy with arrival of Jack. Now things get serious.
  Picture B. Jack resting.
  Picture D. Jack at weeks old with mother, dad, and brother Jimmie.
  Picture F. John Marcks with JWT1
standing over their younger brothers. When Jack was a training officer at Ford Ord in 1961, my young Marcks age peer here (name forgot) was an enlisted man. Mother had stayed in touch with the Marcks family, and asked me to introduce myself to the soldier, which I did. Older brother John (Jim's cohort) became a lawyer in Portland, if I recall.
  Picture C. Jimmie pleased with toy in hand.
  Picture E. Jack is getting started right by pulling Jimmie's ear, being supervised by mother.
• The Silverton web page welcome to tourists today warns:

Welcome to Silverton

"Founded in the 1890's as a mining town, Silverton is on a partially paved, partially unpaved backroad, that is not for the faint of heart or those afraid of heights as it has steep dropoffs, but for those willing to make the ride you will not be disappointed. This road goes right through the Boulder River Wilderness, you will find mostly homes in Silverton and a campground for the local schools."

Indeed Jack as a three year old can remember father JWT1 driving much too fast down steep hills on hairpin turns, with mother screaming in the front seat. Based on my limited experience, her screaming appeared to be not without merit. Life in the Truher family in those days was not always calm or reassuring.

Father JWT kept a striking photo of a rushing mountain river, which I think he identified as the Snohomish River. I may be remembering another native Indian name for the River. Dad very much enjoyed being in this rugged country, but he often cautioned, "you have to have something to do when you get there." Not being a fisherman, a hiker, or otherwise into diversionary relaxation, his enjoyment with mother in later trips north to his place of origin was limited mostly to frantic
touring by auto.
  North Cascades of Washington
The Northern Cascades are possibly the most rugged mountains in North America.  The mountains are among the youngest on the continent, permeated with glaciers and snowfields.  Because of the ubiquitous presence of ice, naturally, there are waterfalls around.  The region's glacial greatly accentuates where and how tall the region's waterfalls occur.  Glacial cirques, hanging valleys, glacial headwalls and paternoster lake valleys are extremely common in this region.  The majority of the regions waterfalls occur because of these geologic features, and because these features often create expansive exposures of rock, the waterfalls of this region tend to be quite tall; many stretching to over 1000 feet or more. This region is bordered on the west by Puget Sound (the San Juan Islands are included in this section), on the south by the Skykomish Watershed divide, on the east by Highway 97, and on the north by the Canadian border.
 The Marcks family came into contact with the Truher family in Seattle because Helen became friends with Mrs. Marcks in the maternity war in the Providence Hospital, Seattle, where JWT2 was born. Helen wasn't otherwise well connected, and Mrs. Marcks appeared to be an educated woman, enthusiastic about her children.

Helen and Mrs. Marcks stayed in touch over the years, visiting each others homes in a recreational sort of way. Mr. Marcks was owner-operator of his own sizable bakery somewhere in greater Portland. Or perhaps it was also in Gresham(?)

Jack recalls visiting the Marcks family home on a trip with parents. I don't know if Jim Jr was with us. Perhaps he was in college. This home was adjacent to a large public garden, comparable to the one in La Canada, California. We walked through the gardens and back to the Marcks home.
We toured the Marcks bakery at least on two different trips. I recall being impressed by the copious insects, flies, feeding on the pastries, cakes, and bread. It was a completely outrageous health problem, which went on for years.

The Marcks bakery, from mother's reports, was very successful in the 1940s, but ran into unionization, labor struggles. Mr. Marcks became bitterly anti-union. His business suffered and was liquidated, I think.



• Friday, January 21, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA1 √ Jim2-Jack 1930s-1940s (pics and text)
• An earlier, very partial version of this outline format web presentation is available elsewhere .

http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/HBT-PA1-wComment.html

From there or from the links below, you can also preview the album pages, full screen, without text, using only the web page BACK function. But you can do that much better from this page. So use this alternative page only if you can't operate this page. Let me know of any problems.

I don't know when I got this album. Because mother has added my wife Nancy's picture on the cover, I may have received the album directly from mother HBT. Perhaps I got the album from JWT2 a couple years ago.
 These pictures are from the album cover, page 00, a composite in time from different eras.

Picture A. Mother HBT sometime after she had been working as a permanent Pasadena Elementary Schools teacher. This was probably about 1952.

Picture B Mother Helen Truher with her two sons, Jim and Jack. Mother was making a connection for me about our two generations with this album page.

Picture C. Nancy Truher with our children Nate and Joel as toddlers about 1970.

Picture D. Grandmother Kathryn Burke. I think I remember the day when my mother prepared her own mother for this picture by a professional photographer.

Picture E. Father JWT1, probably about 1952
 
picture A. The house that dad build on a corner of his father's property on Riverton Heights land - north and in the flight path of, the Seattle-Tacoma airport. This is where Jack learned to walk.

Jim (JWT2) wrote to Jack (JBT) in February-November 2001:
 
picture A.
Caption is "Hotel Oakland" in the 1930s. Perhaps this is a photo of one of JWT1's trip to Berkeley playing basketball. Perhaps it was a trip of Helen and Jim Truher. Jack never heard any other explanation of what this photo was about.

picture B. JWT at what looks like fraternity row at USC, probably the Phi Sigma Kappa house of which he was President for a time.

picture C. JWT1 basketball photo of USC

picture D: JWT1 in suit

picture E: Unidentifed co-ed, probably at UCLA. Does not look like HBT.

picture F: scene of UCLA campus, where mother HBT was member of first graduating class.
 
picture A: Milo Burke, brother of Helen Burke.

picture B: Jim Truher at USC about 1931. Notice standard Truher arms are too long for standard sweaters.

picture C: Helen Burke about 1931 in nice street scene. Helen and Jim seem to be taking pictures of each other.

picture D: Aunt Marie Murphy of Gresham, Oregon is at left in the 1930s. Aunt Marie was the wife of Kate Murphy Burke's brother. Their home in Gresham was a regular stopping off point as the Truher's traveled back and forth from Seattle to Los Angeles in the late 1930s and early 1940s. At center is Aunt Marie's geeky son, Danny, probably in high school. Woman at right is unrecognized.

picture E: Kate Murphy Burke, mother of Helen Burke Truher in mid-1930s, est.

picture F. Kate Murphy Burke with her son, Leo (Glen) about 1936, est.

picture G. Unrecognized scene of two women and a child picking fruit from a tree
 
picture A.
Look carefully at pictures A & C together. Picture C is grandmother Kate Burke's House in Los Angeles, so Picture A may be the back side of that house. Aunt Marie Murphy appears to be the seated woman (as is best seen on the original copy, but would also be clear on high res copy of this page). The woman picking tomatoes may be Helen Burke Truher, who had a particular fondness for tomatoes.

JWT2 doesn't thing that Picture A is behind Kate's Burke's LA house. Instead he suggests: "This may be mother's Torrance house that I have never seen; the roof line isi not consistent with Kate Burke's 73rd Street house"

picture B. Edna Burke and Milo Burke, Helen Burke's siblings, are shown together, probably at Kate Murphy Burke's home of the same era.

picture C. Kate Murphy Burke's home while Helen Burke was in college and until mid to late 1940s.

picture D. Helen Burke Truher dressed up in gloves, looking a bit pigeon-toed (inherited by son, Jack). The dog is Kate Burke's Chi-Wa-Wa, a breed she kept so long as she lived at the East L.A. house.

picture E. This dog belonged to Helen Burke Truher before and during her early marriage to Jim Truher. The house in background is probably where they lived as newly weds, a guess made likely because of it's simple rustic (cheap) state, and because we never heard a word about the location.

picture F. Kate Burke with an unidentified woman on what appears to be a shopping trip?
  picture A. Jim Truher with lake scene at background. The context of this page suggests that most nature scenes are of Scenic in the Cascades.

picture B. Helen Burke Truher with unidentified woman with river in background.

picture C. Helen Burke Truher with her dog. The pants that Helen and Jim are wearing might be for horseback riding, though we never heard of this activity. Maybe for snake protection?

picture D. Helen's dog.

picture E. River scene shows children and dog with two unidentified women.
 
picture A. Snowy view of JWT1 unknown location, probably at Scenic.

picture B. Snow bound river scene, same location. Brother Jim says: "I recall mom saying this photo is of the Scenic River. There is a river like this along the road up to Scenic. The road does go East through the mountains and MAY even now is BE closed AT TIMES during the Winter months. The road that does close for sure is the 410/123 road complex through the mountains by Mt Rainier. I drove it a few years ago until I came to the point where signs said “Road Closed till late spring” 

picture C. Helen Burke Truher, thin tummy with her dog and unknown woman.

picture D. Jimmie (JWT2) has arrived, we know, from Providence Hospital in Seattle, which is either the same building as named Maynard Hospital where Jack was born.

picture E. Jimmie looking alert at about 6 months old.

picture F. Mother Helen Truher with Jimmie at a less than a month old.
• 
picture A. HBT's sister Edna Burke with her mother, Kate Burke, at porch of Kate's home in south-central-west Los Angeles on West 73rd Street (see map) between Van Ness St. and Western Ave in Los Angeles, near Figueroa. Boy is Bobbie Burke, Milo's son by his first wife.
 
picture A. Seated on grass, from left to right, grandmother Nellie Truher, JWT1's sister, May Truher, JWT2 pulling on shirt of JWT1's brother Lewis Truher, and August Truher. Scene is probably set in the back yard of August and Nellie Truher in their new house at 3115 South 153rd Street, Riverton Heights, Seattle.
 
picture A. Unknown scene. JWT2 says eastern Washington State, maybe Winnatchee.

picture B. JWT2 about age 2 with JWT1 in snow, probably Seattle in 1936. Jack not on scene yet.

picture C. JWT1 family probably at August Truher's home in Riverton Heights on day of light snow.

picture D. Jimmie (JWT1) featured as much loved first child of parents. Helen Truher was a super mom enthusiast about her children. Few reservations. No looking back. Great pride. Serious endeavor. Jack learned never to underestimate the determination of a healthy woman in midst of child-bearing.
 
picture A,B,C. Jimmie with proud mom, Helen Truher, and grand mother Nellie Truher. There were emerging tensions between Helen and Nellie. Nellie was very much the German traditionalist. Helen was tried of being broke and wanted to work part time to make some money. Big tension.

picture D. Riverside Motel has no place in my recollection of any mention. Jack wasn't born yet.

picture D. JW1, JWT2, August Truher appears to be same snow scene at Riverton Heights property, 1936.
 
picture A. JWT1 and Johnny Marcks, unknown location.

picture B. JWT1,2 perhaps at Scenic.

picture C. Edna Nasby, Helen Truher, and grandmother Kate Burke in Springtime visit (notice flowers), with JWT1 (wheelbarrow). Helen may show some evidence of early pregnancy (Jack).

picture D.` JWT2 with unknown child, perhaps a Marcks sibling. Guess here is that this is from a visit by Marcks family (more in later pictures).
 
Picture A & C. Edna Burke Nasby (Helen's sister) with grandmother Kate Burke at Scenic. JWT1 appears to be more about 3.5 years old. PIctures surely taken by Helen Burke Truher.

Picture B, D, E. JWT2 with unknown mother and baby. Perhaps at Scenic, though many such work camp locations must have been used. This woman was likely an important companion for Helen to get this much album space.
 View each album page without text by clicking on any one of highlighted links below,
e.g. page HBT_PA_02
 Open and view the text associated with each of the album pictures on each page by clicking on the (+) bullet point symbol at left of each line below. This opens up a block of text. Close this text when you are ready to open text for a different page.
 View this album's text and pictures together online by first setting up this text outline format web page window to fill the left third , or less, of your monitor viewing area. Leave it open. Click on any of the page links below, which should open a second web window for viewing the album pictures. Set this new window size to fill the right two thirds of your monitor viewing space. Navigate over this right window using the right and bottom border controls to find individual pictures on the page. When you select a new page link, you will replace the page in the right-window.
• Click on the (+) bullet point at left
• Wednesday, January 19, 2005
• HBT Photo Album PA1 √ Jim2-Jack 1930s-1940s (pics and text)
• album page HBT_PA1_01
•  Photo Album 1 is 20 pages plus cover
• album page HBT_PA1_02
• album page HBT_PA1_03
• album page HBT_PA1_04
• album page HBT_PA1_05
• album page HBT_PA1_06
• album page HBT_PA1_07
• album page HBT_PA1_08
• album page HBT_PA1_09
• album page HBT_PA1_10
• album page HBT_PA1_11
• album page HBT_PA1_20
• album page HBT_PA1_18
• album page HBT_PA1_17
• album page HBT_PA1_16
• album page HBT_PA1_15
• album page HBT_PA1_14
• album page HBT_PA1_13
• album page HBT_PA1_12
• album page HBT_PA1_00 cover
• album page HBT_PA1_19
• Sunday, January 16, 2005
• Outline of Ford Family √
 Descendants of Unknown Ford January 6, 2004

1 Unknown FORD
2 Richard FORD Born: England Died: 1809 Between Delaware and Ohio
+Mary GILLS Born: England Died: January 08, 1808 Delaware
3 Henry FORD Born: November 15, 1780 Delaware Died: July 07, 1839 Hamilton Township,
Warren County Ohio Burial: 1839 Plum Run Cemetery, Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio
+Susannah UNKNOWNU Born: Abt. 1778 Delaware Died: January 12, 1851 Hamiltion Township,
Warren County Ohio Burial: 1851 Plum Run Cemetery, Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio
4 Richard FORD Born: October 28, 1812 Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio
+Cynthia Ann LUDLUM Born: March 25, 1817 Married: January 07, 1834
Died: August 11, 1889 Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio Burial: Plum Run Cemetery,
Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio
5 Margaret L. FORD
5 Rebecca E. FORD
5 John H. FORD Born: September 23, 1837 Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio
Died: May 07, 1839 Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio Burial: Plum Run Cemetery,
Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio
5 [1] Smith Moses FORD Born: 1844 Morrow, Ohio Died: April 11, 1901 Kansas City, Missouri
+Kate CLAIBORN
6 Guilford Claiborn FORD I Born: 1874 Paola, Kansas Died: 1936
+Ida UNKNOWN
*2nd Wife of [1] Smith Moses FORD:
+Mary Hanford FINNEY Born: November 01, 1856 Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Died: February 06, 1937 Clearwater, Florida
6 Roland Hanford FORD Born: July 07, 1879 Kansas City, Missouri
Died: November 08, 1950 Kansas City, Missouri
+Clara Amelia "Clarice" BAYERSDOERFER Born: October 10, 1876 Saint Louis, Missouri
Married: June 18, 1902 Saint Louis, Missouri Died: February 17, 1960
7 Hanford FORD Born: 1903
7 Roland Ford JR. Born: 1904
+Virginia UNKNOWN
8 STILLBORN
7 Guilford Claiborne "Clay" FORD II Born: March 22, 1909 Kansas City, Missouri
Died: October 30, 1993 Long Beach, Los Angeles California
+Fleta May SMITH Born: March 10, 1917 Independence, Missouri
Married: June 04, 1938 Kansas City, Missouri Died: December 10, 1962
Palos Verdes, California
8 Nancy Ann FORD Born: July 23, 1940 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota
+John Burke "Jack" TRUHER Born: February 05, 1938 Seattle, Washington
Married: January 29, 1966 San Antonio de Padua Mission, Jolon, California
9 Nathaniel Luke TRUHER Born: December 20, 1966 Stanford Hospital, California
9 Joel Burke TRUHER Born: June 06, 1968 Stanford Hospital, California
+Tammy ZIEHM Born: 1965 Married: August 02, 1996 San Francisco, California
10 Ryan Ziehm TRUHER Born: March 01, 2003 Sequoia Hospital, Redwood City, California
10 Molly Elizabeth TRUHER Born: December 08, 2004 Sequoia Hospital, Redwood City, California
9 Heather Lee TRUHER Born: October 07, 1971 Stanford Hospital, California
+Nathanael COUSINS Born: February 21, 1970 Married: June 27, 1998
10 Amanda Claire COUSINS Born: August 19, 2000 University of Chicago Hospital,
Chicago, Cook County Illinois
10 Kate Audrey COUSINS Born: May 05, 2004 Pacific Medical Center,
San Francisco, California, 4:00 PM PDT
8 Joan Marie FORD Born: July 01, 1943 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota
7 Mary Elizabeth FORD Born: February 14, 1914
+Arthur MAURER Married: Abt. 1934 Died: Abt. 1970
8 Karen MAURER Born: 1938
+Unknown THEOBALD
9 David THEOBALD
9 Claire THEOBALD
+UNKNOWN
9 Steve THEOBALD Born: Australia
8 Ford MAURER Born: 1940
+Christine UNKNOWN
9 Bo MAURER
9 Ashley MAURER
9 Unknown MAURER
8 Susan MAURER Born: 1943
+UNKNOWN
9 Mimi UNKNOWN
+UNKOWN
10 Ryan UNKNOWN Born: August 2004
10 Jack UNKNOWN Born: 2001
8 Craig MAURER Born: 1946
+UNKNOWN
9 Jacob MAURER
9 Bethany MAURER
6 Garreth FORD
6 Lynette FORD
+Unknown STORM
4 Henry FORD Born: May 21, 1817 Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio Died: August 19, 1881
+UNKNOWN Born: 1789 Near Lexington, Kentucky Married: January 14, 1841
5 Samuel H. FORD
5 Eliza C. FORD
5 Mary J. FORD
5 Margaret FORD
3 Elijah FORD Born: August 06, 1782 Delaware Died: January 19, 1831 Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio
+Jerusha KIBBEY Married: August 08, 1811 Died: February 26, 1843 Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio
4 Phoebe FORD Born: August 13, 1811
+John FOREMAN
4 Richard FORD Born: April 02, 1815
+Elizabeth MCFERREN
5 James M. FORD Born: 1846 Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio
Died: October 23, 1848 Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio
4 Julia FORD Born: February 24, 1817
+William PENQUITE
4 Jemima FORD Born: March 16, 1818
+James MCFERREN
4 Ephriam FORD Born: December 01, 1820
+Sophia CLINE
4 Sarah A. FORD Born: May 13, 1821
4 Samuel D. FORD Born: May 31, 1823 Hamilton County Ohio
Died: August 01, 1888 Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio Burial: 1888 Plum Run Cemetery,
Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio
+Margaret E. WELLS Born: January 04, 1825 Warren County Ohio Died: March 15, 1871
Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio Burial: 1871 Plum Run Cemetery, Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio
5 Sarah A. FORD
5 James H. FORD
5 Adella FORD
5 Jerusha E. FORD
5 Edward G. FORD
5 Ida J. FORD
5 David F. FORD
4 Harriet P. FORD Born: October 11, 1824
4 [2] Claudius W. FORD Born: March 01, 1826
+Elizabeth HALE
*2nd Wife of [2] Claudius W. FORD:
+UNKNOWN
4 John P. FORD Born: October 11, 1827
+Emma HEWITT
4 Mary E. FORD Born: January 27, 1831
+Unkown MOON
3 Jonathan FORD Born: June 12, 1784 Died: Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio
3 Amelia FORD Born: June 10, 1786 Died: Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio
3 Joseph FORD Born: March 29, 1797 Died: Putnam County Ohio
+Phebe KIBBEY
4 Jonathan G. FORD
+Sarah A. ROHRER
5 [3] Benjamin G. FORD
+Olive Mae DEFFENBAUGH Married: November 05, 1855
*2nd Wife of [3] Benjamin G. FORD:
+Marilda Jane Myers STAUFFER Married: June 29, 1895
2 Brother One FORD
2 Brother Two FORD
• Report on Ford Family √
 Report on Descendants of Unknown Ford


Generation No. 1

1. Unknown1 Ford

Children of Unknown Ford are:
+ 2 i. Richard2 Ford, born in England; died 1809 in Between Delaware and Ohio.
3 ii. Brother One Ford.
4 iii. Brother Two Ford.


Generation No. 2

2. Richard2 Ford (Unknown1) was born in England, and died 1809 in Between Delaware and Ohio. He married Mary Gills. She was born in England, and died January 08, 1808 in Delaware.

Notes for Richard Ford:

http://www.rootsweb.com/~ohwarren/Beers/V/ham/0945_ford-samuel-d.htm

FROM THE HISTORY OF GRANDSON SAMUEL D. FORD:

Samuel D. Ford
Previous Index Next
Contributor:: Transcription contributed by Arne H Trelvik 30 May 2003

Sources: The History of Warren County Ohio
Part V. Biographical Sketches
Hamilton Township
(Chicago, IL: W. H. Beers Co, 1882; reprint, Mt. Vernon, IN: Windmill Publications, 1992)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 945

SAMUEL D. FORD, farmer, P.O., Morrow, was born in Hamilton Co., O. in 1823, and is a son of Elijah and Jerusha (Kibbey) Ford. He (Elijah) was born in Delaware, Aug. 6, 1782, and was a son of

Richard Ford, who, with two brothers, emigrated from England to America about the year 1774 or 1775, and settled
in either Virginia or Maryland. All went into the war on the American side and
fought throughout the lengthy struggle. Richard was married to Mary Gills, who
bore him 5 children viz: Henry, born Nov. 15, 1780; Elijah, (date above);
Jonathan, born June 12, 1784; Amelia, born June 10, 1786; Joseph, born March
29, 1797. Mary, wife of Richard, died Jan. 8, 1808. In 1809, he started for
Ohio and on the road was accidentally killed by being run over by his loaded
wagon. The family came on and settled in this township where all lived and
died, except Joseph, who died in Putnam County Ohio.



References:
(1) Genealogy chart "Ancestors of Nancy Ann Ford"
(2) Newspaper article "Mrs. Smith M. Ford Dies"
(3) Kansas City Star newspaper article "Oldest Library Book Gift from the Star"
(4) Newspaper article "Guilford C. Ford Dies"
(5) Computer printout "Kansas Patriotism Aroused/Call for a State Mass Meeting/A Great Civic Demonstration"
(6) Computer printout "Newspaper History" from URL
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/wyandott/history/1911/volume1/295.html
(7) Xerox-copy of biographical listing for Richard Ford and relatives, on p. 945 of unknown document. NOTE (by Ron Haack, January 06, 2005): The book is "The history of Warren County, Ohio" by Josiah Morrow, publisher W. H. Beers & Company, 1882.
(8) Hand-transcription by Nancy Ford Truher of family historical items conveyed verbally


More About Richard Ford:
Immigration: England

Children of Richard Ford and Mary Gills are:
+ 5 i. Henry3 Ford, born November 15, 1780 in Delaware; died July 07, 1839 in Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio.
+ 6 ii. Elijah Ford, born August 06, 1782 in Delaware; died January 19, 1831 in Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio.
7 iii. Jonathan Ford, born June 12, 1784; died in Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio.

Notes for Jonathan Ford:
References:
(1) Genealogy chart "Ancestors of Nancy Ann Ford"
(2) Newspaper article "Mrs. Smith M. Ford Dies"
(3) Kansas City Star newspaper article "Oldest Library Book Gift from the Star"
(4) Newspaper article "Guilford C. Ford Dies"
(5) Computer printout "Kansas Patriotism Aroused/Call for a State Mass Meeting/A Great Civic Demonstration"
(6) Computer printout "Newspaper History" from URL
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/wyandott/history/1911/volume1/295.html
(7) Xerox-copy of biographical listing for Richard Ford and relatives, on p. 945 of unknown document. NOTE (by Ron Haack, January 06, 2005): The book is "The history of Warren County, Ohio" by Josiah Morrow, publisher W. H. Beers & Company, 1882.
(8) Hand-transcription by Nancy Ford Truher of family historical items conveyed verbally


8 iv. Amelia Ford, born June 10, 1786; died in Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio.
+ 9 v. Joseph Ford, born March 29, 1797; died in Putnam County Ohio.


Generation No. 3

5. Henry3 Ford (Richard2, Unknown1) was born November 15, 1780 in Delaware, and died July 07, 1839 in Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio. He married Susannah Unknownu. She was born Abt. 1778 in Delaware, and died January 12, 1851 in Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio.

Notes for Henry Ford:


References:
(1) Genealogy chart "Ancestors of Nancy Ann Ford"
(2) Newspaper article "Mrs. Smith M. Ford Dies"
(3) Kansas City Star newspaper article "Oldest Library Book Gift from the Star"
(4) Newspaper article "Guilford C. Ford Dies"
(5) Computer printout "Kansas Patriotism Aroused/Call for a State Mass Meeting/A Great Civic Demonstration"
(6) Computer printout "Newspaper History" from URL
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/wyandott/history/1911/volume1/295.html
(7) Xerox-copy of biographical listing for Richard Ford and relatives, on p. 945 of unknown document. NOTE (by Ron Haack, January 06, 2005): The book is "The history of Warren County, Ohio" by Josiah Morrow, publisher W. H. Beers & Company, 1882.
(8) Hand-transcription by Nancy Ford Truher of family historical items conveyed verbally


More About Henry Ford:
Burial: 1839, Plum Run Cemetery, Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio

More About Susannah Unknownu:
Burial: 1851, Plum Run Cemetery, Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio

Children of Henry Ford and Susannah Unknownu are:
+ 10 i. Richard4 Ford, born October 28, 1812 in Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio.
+ 11 ii. Henry Ford, born May 21, 1817 in Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio; died August 19, 1881.


6. Elijah3 Ford (Richard2, Unknown1) was born August 06, 1782 in Delaware, and died January 19, 1831 in Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio. He married Jerusha Kibbey August 08, 1811, daughter of Joseph Kibbey. She died February 26, 1843 in Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio.

Notes for Elijah Ford:
References:
(1) Genealogy chart "Ancestors of Nancy Ann Ford"
(2) Newspaper article "Mrs. Smith M. Ford Dies"
(3) Kansas City Star newspaper article "Oldest Library Book Gift from the Star"
(4) Newspaper article "Guilford C. Ford Dies"
(5) Computer printout "Kansas Patriotism Aroused/Call for a State Mass Meeting/A Great Civic Demonstration"
(6) Computer printout "Newspaper History" from URL
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/wyandott/history/1911/volume1/295.html
(7) Xerox-copy of biographical listing for Richard Ford and relatives, on p. 945 of unknown document. NOTE (by Ron Haack, January 06, 2005): The book is "The history of Warren County, Ohio" by Josiah Morrow, publisher W. H. Beers & Company, 1882.
(8) Hand-transcription by Nancy Ford Truher of family historical items conveyed verbally


Notes for Jerusha Kibbey:
References:
(1) Genealogy chart "Ancestors of Nancy Ann Ford"
(2) Newspaper article "Mrs. Smith M. Ford Dies"
(3) Kansas City Star newspaper article "Oldest Library Book Gift from the Star"
(4) Newspaper article "Guilford C. Ford Dies"
(5) Computer printout "Kansas Patriotism Aroused/Call for a State Mass Meeting/A Great Civic Demonstration"
(6) Computer printout "Newspaper History" from URL
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/wyandott/history/1911/volume1/295.html
(7) Xerox-copy of biographical listing for Richard Ford and relatives, on p. 945 of unknown document. NOTE (by Ron Haack, January 06, 2005): The book is "The history of Warren County, Ohio" by Josiah Morrow, publisher W. H. Beers & Company, 1882.
(8) Hand-transcription by Nancy Ford Truher of family historical items conveyed verbally


Children of Elijah Ford and Jerusha Kibbey are:
12 i. Phoebe4 Ford, born August 13, 1811. She married John Foreman.
+ 13 ii. Richard Ford, born April 02, 1815.
14 iii. Julia Ford, born February 24, 1817. She married William Penquite.
15 iv. Jemima Ford, born March 16, 1818. She married James McFerren.
16 v. Ephriam Ford, born December 01, 1820. He married Sophia Cline.
17 vi. Sarah A. Ford, born May 13, 1821.
+ 18 vii. Samuel D. Ford, born May 31, 1823 in Hamilton County Ohio; died August 01, 1888 in Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio.
19 viii. Harriet P. Ford, born October 11, 1824.
20 ix. Claudius W. Ford, born March 01, 1826. He married (1) Elizabeth Hale. He married (2) Unknown.
21 x. John P. Ford, born October 11, 1827. He married Emma Hewitt.
22 xi. Mary E. Ford, born January 27, 1831. She married Unkown Moon.


9. Joseph3 Ford (Richard2, Unknown1) was born March 29, 1797, and died in Putnam County Ohio. He married Phebe Kibbey.

Notes for Joseph Ford:
References:
(1) Genealogy chart "Ancestors of Nancy Ann Ford"
(2) Newspaper article "Mrs. Smith M. Ford Dies"
(3) Kansas City Star newspaper article "Oldest Library Book Gift from the Star"
(4) Newspaper article "Guilford C. Ford Dies"
(5) Computer printout "Kansas Patriotism Aroused/Call for a State Mass Meeting/A Great Civic Demonstration"
(6) Computer printout "Newspaper History" from URL
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/wyandott/history/1911/volume1/295.html
(7) Xerox-copy of biographical listing for Richard Ford and relatives, on p. 945 of unknown document. NOTE (by Ron Haack, January 06, 2005): The book is "The history of Warren County, Ohio" by Josiah Morrow, publisher W. H. Beers & Company, 1882.
(8) Hand-transcription by Nancy Ford Truher of family historical items conveyed verbally


Child of Joseph Ford and Phebe Kibbey is:
+ 23 i. Jonathan G.4 Ford.


Generation No. 4

10. Richard4 Ford (Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born October 28, 1812 in Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio. He married Cynthia Ann Ludlum January 07, 1834. She was born March 25, 1817, and died August 11, 1889 in Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio.

Notes for Richard Ford:

http://www.rootsweb.com/~ohwarren/Beers/V/ham/0945_ford-richard.htm

Sources: The History of Warren County Ohio
Part V. Biographical Sketches
Hamilton Township
(Chicago, IL: W. H. Beers Co, 1882; reprint, Mt. Vernon, IN: Windmill Publications, 1992)
Related Links:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 945

RICHARD FORD, farmer, P.O., Morrow. Richard Ford, the subject of our sketch, was born in Hamilton Township, Warren Co., O., on Oct. 28, 1812. He was the son of Henry and Susan Ford, who were among Warren Co.’s first settlers. Richard was reared on a farm, and received his education in a district school. He was married Jan. 7, 1834, to Cynthia L. Ludlum. To them have been born three children, viz: Margaret L., Smith M. and Rebecca E. He had been successful in business, and is at present the owner of 100 acres of tillable land. Smith M., Mr. Ford’s only son, was reared on a farm till he arrived at the age of 13, at which age he attended the Maineville Academy, from whence he went to Delaware University at the age of 16, and graduated with honors in his 20th year. He was a teacher in the Female Academy of Xenia in 1866. He is a talented speaker, and very successful in business matters.





References:
(1) Genealogy chart "Ancestors of Nancy Ann Ford"
(2) Newspaper article "Mrs. Smith M. Ford Dies"
(3) Kansas City Star newspaper article "Oldest Library Book Gift from the Star"
(4) Newspaper article "Guilford C. Ford Dies"
(5) Computer printout "Kansas Patriotism Aroused/Call for a State Mass Meeting/A Great Civic Demonstration"
(6) Computer printout "Newspaper History" from URL
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/wyandott/history/1911/volume1/295.html
(7) Xerox-copy of biographical listing for Richard Ford and relatives, on p. 945 of unknown document. NOTE (by Ron Haack, January 06, 2005): The book is "The history of Warren County, Ohio" by Josiah Morrow, publisher W. H. Beers & Company, 1882.
(8) Hand-transcription by Nancy Ford Truher of family historical items conveyed verbally



More About Cynthia Ann Ludlum:
Burial: Plum Run Cemetery, Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio

Children of Richard Ford and Cynthia Ludlum are:
24 i. Margaret L.5 Ford.
25 ii. Rebecca E. Ford.
26 iii. John H. Ford, born September 23, 1837 in Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio; died May 07, 1839 in Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio.

More About John H. Ford:
Burial: Plum Run Cemetery, Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio

+ 27 iv. Smith Moses Ford, born 1844 in Morrow, Ohio; died April 11, 1901 in Kansas City, Missouri.


11. Henry4 Ford (Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born May 21, 1817 in Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio, and died August 19, 1881. He married Unknown January 14, 1841. She was born 1789 in Near Lexington, Kentucky.

Notes for Henry Ford:

http://www.rootsweb.com/~ohwarren/Beers/V/ham/0945_ford-henry.htm

Sources: The History of Warren County Ohio
Part V. Biographical Sketches
Hamilton Township
(Chicago, IL: W. H. Beers Co, 1882; reprint, Mt. Vernon, IN: Windmill Publications, 1992)
Related Links:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Page 945

HENRY FORD, deceased, was born in Hamilton Township, May 21, 1817, and was a son of Henry and Susan Ford, who were born in Delaware. His early education was received in the traditional log school house. Jan. 14, 1841, he was married. Mrs. Ford born near Lexington, Ky., in the year 1789. After his marriage he located on a farm left him by his father. To them were born eight children, two of whom are living, viz: Samuel H. and Eliza C. The deceased are: Mary J. and Margaret S. The others died in infancy. He lived on the home place eleven years; then removed to a farm south of Maineville, and finally to the home occupied at this time by his widow. During his business career he was largely engaged in dealing in stock, and was one of the best farmers in the township. He was a large, portly man, and when in health weighed 350 pounds. He was a consistent and exemplary member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The last five years of his life were years of continual suffering, but he managed his business up to within a few days of his death, and was ready for the fell destroyer when he came, and calmly fell into that sleep which knows no waking Aug. 19, 1881. The father of Mrs. F. was married to Jane Pollock, who died at the age of 23 years. They were parents of three children – all deceased. His second marriage was celebrated with Margaret Liggett, Jan. 13, 1813, and to them were born nine children, and Mrs. F. is the only surviving one. He engaged in farming in which he continued in until his death. He and his estimable wife were members of the Presbyterian Church, to which they belonged for a term of years.




References:
(1) Genealogy chart "Ancestors of Nancy Ann Ford"
(2) Newspaper article "Mrs. Smith M. Ford Dies"
(3) Kansas City Star newspaper article "Oldest Library Book Gift from the Star"
(4) Newspaper article "Guilford C. Ford Dies"
(5) Computer printout "Kansas Patriotism Aroused/Call for a State Mass Meeting/A Great Civic Demonstration"
(6) Computer printout "Newspaper History" from URL
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/wyandott/history/1911/volume1/295.html
(7) Xerox-copy of biographical listing for Richard Ford and relatives, on p. 945 of unknown document. NOTE (by Ron Haack, January 06, 2005): The book is "The history of Warren County, Ohio" by Josiah Morrow, publisher W. H. Beers & Company, 1882.
(8) Hand-transcription by Nancy Ford Truher of family historical items conveyed verbally


More About Henry Ford:
Religion: Methodist Episcopal Church

Children of Henry Ford and Unknown are:
28 i. Samuel H.5 Ford.
29 ii. Eliza C. Ford.
30 iii. Mary J. Ford.
31 iv. Margaret Ford.


13. Richard4 Ford (Elijah3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born April 02, 1815. He married Elizabeth McFerren.

Child of Richard Ford and Elizabeth McFerren is:
32 i. James M.5 Ford, born 1846 in Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio; died October 23, 1848 in Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio.


18. Samuel D.4 Ford (Elijah3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born May 31, 1823 in Hamilton County Ohio, and died August 01, 1888 in Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio. He married Margaret E. Wells, daughter of Z. Wells. She was born January 04, 1825 in Warren County Ohio, and died March 15, 1871 in Hamiltion Township, Warren County Ohio.

Notes for Samuel D. Ford:
SAMUEL D. FORD, farmer, P.O., Morrow, was born in Hamilton Co., O.
in 1823, and is a son of Elijah and Jerusha (Kibbey) Ford. He (Elijah) was born
in Delaware, Aug. 6, 1782, and was a son of Richard Ford, who, with two brothers,
emigrated from England to America about the year 1774 or 1775, and settled
in either Virginia or Maryland. All went into the war on the American side and
fought throughout the lengthy struggle. Richard was married to Mary Gills, who
bore him 5 children viz: Henry, born Nov. 15, 1780; Elijah, (date above);
Jonathan, born June 12, 1784; Amelia, born June 10, 1786; Joseph, born March
29, 1797. Mary, wife of Richard, died Jan. 8, 1808. In 1809, he started for
Ohio and on the road was accidentally killed by being run over by his loaded
wagon. The family came on and settled in this township where all lived and
died, except Joseph, who died in Putnam Co., O. Elijah was marriet to Jerusha
Kibby, Aug. 8, 1811. Twelve children were born to them, viz: Phoebe, born
Aug. 13, 1813, married John Foreman; Richard, born April 2, 1815, married
Elizabeth McFerren; Julia, born Feb. 24, 1817, married William Penquite;
Jemima, born March 16, 1818, married James McFerren; Ephriam, born Dec. 1,
1820, married Sophia Cline; Sarah A., born May 13, 1821; Samuel D., born
May 31, 1823, married Margaret E. Wells, Sept. 1, 1850; Harriet P., born Oct.
11, 1824; Claudius W., born March 1, 1826, married Elizabeth Hale, his second
wife’s name not known; John P., born Oct. 11, 1827, married Emma Hewitt;
Mary E., born Jan. 27, 1831, married _______.Moon; Elijah Ford, died Jan. 19,
1831; his wife died Feb. 26, 1843. Mr. Ford made a permanent home in the
county and was a successful business man. Joseph Kibbey, father of Mrs. Ford,
was one of the first settlers in Ohio, having located in Columbia near Cincinnati when
Indians were plenty, where he was made Captain of a Company of Home Guards.
He was a man of Herculean strength and undaunted courage, and once when
challenged by an English officer to mortal combat and asked to name the place and
time, he replied, “Here is the place, and now is the time, and handed one of the two
pistols that lay on a table to the Englishman. The latter became unnerved by the
coolness of the Captain and “wilted,” whereupon was immediately knocked down
with the butt of the pistol, in the hands of the brave Captain. Our subject was
reared in Warren Co., to which he came when 6 years old and here he has resided
since. To him and wife were born seven children, four living, viz: Sarah A.,
James H., Adella and Jerusha E.; the deceased are Edward G, Ida J. and David
F. Mrs. Ford died March 15, 1871; was born in Warren Co., Jan 4, 1825,
and was a daughter of Z. Wells, of Virginia, who was an early settler in this
county. Our subject owns 66 _ acres of well improved land.


More About Samuel D. Ford:
Burial: 1888, Plum Run Cemetery, Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio

More About Margaret E. Wells:
Burial: 1871, Plum Run Cemetery, Hamilton Township, Warren County Ohio

Children of Samuel Ford and Margaret Wells are:
33 i. Sarah A.5 Ford.
34 ii. James H. Ford.
35 iii. Adella Ford.
36 iv. Jerusha E. Ford.
37 v. Edward G. Ford.
38 vi. Ida J. Ford.
39 vii. David F. Ford.


23. Jonathan G.4 Ford (Joseph3, Richard2, Unknown1) He married Sarah A. Rohrer.

Notes for Jonathan G. Ford:
References:
(1) Genealogy chart "Ancestors of Nancy Ann Ford"
(2) Newspaper article "Mrs. Smith M. Ford Dies"
(3) Kansas City Star newspaper article "Oldest Library Book Gift from the Star"
(4) Newspaper article "Guilford C. Ford Dies"
(5) Computer printout "Kansas Patriotism Aroused/Call for a State Mass Meeting/A Great Civic Demonstration"
(6) Computer printout "Newspaper History" from URL
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/wyandott/history/1911/volume1/295.html
(7) Xerox-copy of biographical listing for Richard Ford and relatives, on p. 945 of unknown document. NOTE (by Ron Haack, January 06, 2005): The book is "The history of Warren County, Ohio" by Josiah Morrow, publisher W. H. Beers & Company, 1882.
(8) Hand-transcription by Nancy Ford Truher of family historical items conveyed verbally


Child of Jonathan Ford and Sarah Rohrer is:
40 i. Benjamin G.5 Ford. He married (1) Olive Mae Deffenbaugh November 05, 1855. He married (2) Marilda Jane Myers Stauffer June 29, 1895.


Generation No. 5

27. Smith Moses5 Ford (Richard4, Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born 1844 in Morrow, Ohio, and died April 11, 1901 in Kansas City, Missouri. He married (1) Kate Claiborn. He married (2) Mary Hanford Finney. She was born November 01, 1856 in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and died February 06, 1937 in Clearwater, Florida.

Notes for Smith Moses Ford:
- From conversation with Mary Ford Maurer, December 26, 27, 2004, in Kansas City, accept as otherwise noted.
- As told to Nancy Ford Truher and Joan Ford Roberts.
- Here compiled by Nancy Truher, Los Altos, revised January 02, 2005.

Smith Moses Ford:
- Born 1844 in Morrow, Ohio and grew up on a farm (7)
- Attended Maineville (Ohio) Academy from the age of 13, then Delaware University from the age of 16, where he graduated with honors at age 20 (7)
- Was a teacher in the Female Academy of Xenia in 1866 (7)
- Background was teaching/literary, then later real estate
- In 1872 and 1873 he was associated with the Kansas City Spirit
- newspaper (6)
- Represented the Kansas City Times at 1875 meeting of founders of Kansas City, Kansas (5)
- Later published and edited newspaper Kansas City Mail (6)
- Had two wives: first Kate Claiborne and second Mary Hanford Finney
- Served in the upper house of the Kansas City, Missouri, city council (2)
- Began a movement in 1889 for a municipally owned water plant; his plan was adopted in 1895 (2)
- At the time of his death in 1901 (1), was collector and assessor of water rates (2)


References:
(1) Genealogy chart "Ancestors of Nancy Ann Ford"
(2) Newspaper article "Mrs. Smith M. Ford Dies"
(3) Kansas City Star newspaper article "Oldest Library Book Gift from the Star"
(4) Newspaper article "Guilford C. Ford Dies"
(5) Computer printout "Kansas Patriotism Aroused/Call for a State Mass Meeting/A Great Civic Demonstration"
(6) Computer printout "Newspaper History" from URL
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/wyandott/history/1911/volume1/295.html
(7) Xerox-copy of biographical listing for Richard Ford and relatives, on p. 945 of unknown document. NOTE (by Ron Haack, January 06, 2005): The book is "The history of Warren County, Ohio" by Josiah Morrow, publisher W. H. Beers & Company, 1882.
(8) Hand-transcription by Nancy Ford Truher of family historical items conveyed verbally


More About Smith Moses Ford:
Education: 1857, Maineville Academy, Ohio

Notes for Kate Claiborn:
- Granddaughter of the first governor of Louisiana (4)
- Prominent in Washington society circles in her early life (4)
- Received a White House invitation to attend James Buchanan's inaugural ball in 1857 (4)



References:
(1) Genealogy chart "Ancestors of Nancy Ann Ford"
(2) Newspaper article "Mrs. Smith M. Ford Dies"
(3) Kansas City Star newspaper article "Oldest Library Book Gift from the Star"
(4) Newspaper article "Guilford C. Ford Dies"
(5) Computer printout "Kansas Patriotism Aroused/Call for a State Mass Meeting/A Great Civic Demonstration"
(6) Computer printout "Newspaper History" from URL
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/wyandott/history/1911/volume1/295.html
(7) Xerox-copy of biographical listing for Richard Ford and relatives, on p. 945 of unknown document. NOTE (by Ron Haack, January 06, 2005): The book is "The history of Warren County, Ohio" by Josiah Morrow, publisher W. H. Beers & Company, 1882.
(8) Hand-transcription by Nancy Ford Truher of family historical items conveyed verbally



Notes for Mary Hanford Finney:
- Born Nov.1, 1857, in Williamsport, Pennsylvania (2)
- Had two brothers, Hanford E. Finney of Detroit and A.M. Finney of Charleston, West Virginia (2)
- Moved to Kansas City as a young woman, married Smith Moses Ford (2)
- Became stepmother to Smith Moses Ford's young son Guilford Ford I.
- Wrote three books, including the oldest book in the Kansas City library system, "Balzac's Seraphita: The Mystery of Sex", copyright 1897 (3)
- Widowed in 1901 (1)
- Then lived in Chicago and New York (2)
- Was prominently identified with the women's suffrage movement in the U.S. and abroad (2)
- In 1913 she was "court-martialed" by English suffragettes who accused her of treason to their organization; she was not present at the "trial" and denied that she had revealed secrets of the Women's Social and Political Union (2)
- Made frequent trips abroad; lectured on international peace and the Bahai religion (2)
- Final home in Toledo, Ohio (2)
- Died in 1937 in Clearwater, Florida (1)




References:
(1) Genealogy chart "Ancestors of Nancy Ann Ford"
(2) Newspaper article "Mrs. Smith M. Ford Dies"
(3) Kansas City Star newspaper article "Oldest Library Book Gift from the Star"
(4) Newspaper article "Guilford C. Ford Dies"
(5) Computer printout "Kansas Patriotism Aroused/Call for a State Mass Meeting/A Great Civic Demonstration"
(6) Computer printout "Newspaper History" from URL
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/archives/wyandott/history/1911/volume1/295.html
(7) Xerox-copy of biographical listing for Richard Ford and relatives, on p. 945 of unknown document. NOTE (by Ron Haack, January 06, 2005): The book is "The history of Warren County, Ohio" by Josiah Morrow, publisher W. H. Beers & Company, 1882.
(8) Hand-transcription by Nancy Ford Truher of family historical items conveyed verbally


Child of Smith Ford and Kate Claiborn is:
41 i. Guilford Claiborn6 Ford I, born 1874 in Paola, Kansas; died 1936. He married Ida Unknown.

Notes for Guilford Claiborn Ford I:
- Born in Paola, Kansas, in 1874, came to Kansas City at age 3 (1), (4)
- Was a great-great-great-grandson of George Ross, a signer of the Declaration of Independence (4)
- Started as a clerk on the Fort Scott & Memphis Railroad (4)
- Wife's name was Ida (4)
- Later became superintendent of the registry department at the Post Office (4)
- With a partner, he started the Walker-Ford Laundry (4)
- In 1914 he opened the Ford Ideal Laundry in his own building (4)
- Was president of the Blue Hills Country Club (4)
- Was president of the Kansas City Laundry Owners' Association at the time of his death (4)
- Lived at 6024 State Line Rd. (Kansas City, Kansas, side) (4)
- Died in 1936 at age 62 of a cerebral hemorrhage (1), (2), (4)




Children of Smith Ford and Mary Finney are:
+ 42 i. Roland Hanford6 Ford, born July 07, 1879 in Kansas City, Missouri; died November 08, 1950 in Kansas City, Missouri.
43 ii. Garreth Ford.
44 iii. Lynette Ford. She married Unknown Storm.


Generation No. 6

42. Roland Hanford6 Ford (Smith Moses5, Richard4, Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born July 07, 1879 in Kansas City, Missouri, and died November 08, 1950 in Kansas City, Missouri. He married Clara Amelia Bayersdoerfer June 18, 1902 in Saint Louis, Missouri, daughter of John Bayersdoerfer and Anna Edelman. She was born October 10, 1876 in Saint Louis, Missouri, and died February 17, 1960.

Notes for Roland Hanford Ford:
- Born in 1879 in Kansas City (1)
- Attended Art Institute of Chicago
- Was hired by his father for period of one year (real estate business), to be rewarded at its end by a trip to study art in Paris
- Trip never took place due to 1901 death of his father by heart attack
- Then "passed himself off as a bookkeeper" and learned accounting; he was noted for having a great memory
- Went to work for Fred Harvey Co., became its Treasurer
- Enjoyed painting and woodcarving; birds and dogs were favorite subjects (8)


- Lived in a house at 4018 E. 67th St. Terrace, Kansas City Missouri (2)

Notes for Clara Amelia Bayersdoerfer:
- Mother died in childbirth when Clarice was ~5; father died when she was 9
- Had one sister, Bessie, who had one daughter, Mabel
- Raised, along with her sister Bessie, by their grandfather, who was a butcher in St. Louis, Missouri (which was a German city); strict Catholics
- Her education was completed only through the fourth grade (8)
- At some point in her early life, worked as a domestic servant (8)
- Changed her name from Clara to Clarice because it was "tonier"
- Worked as a traveling saleswoman (8)
- Was working with a group that came to Kansas City, where she met and married Roland Hanford Ford





Children of Roland Ford and Clara Bayersdoerfer are:
45 i. Hanford7 Ford, born 1903.

Notes for Hanford Ford:
- Was at one time with the "Frisco Railroad", which no longer exists; also at one time worked at a bank
- Lived in Springfield, Missouri, at one time
- Developed tuberculosis ~1930-31; had one lung permanently collapsed
- Care was financed by his father; a financial blow to the family
- Married Henrietta, who worked at Fred Harvey and was a good singer
- Had three children: doctor, priest, nun
- Later was separated from his wife, but not divorced
- According to Mary, Hanford was "over-religious", "too Catholic to grow intellectually"
- In later life he owned and operated a shoe store in Eagle Rock, California (8)




+ 46 ii. Roland Ford Jr., born 1904.
+ 47 iii. Guilford Claiborne Ford II, born March 22, 1909 in Kansas City, Missouri; died October 30, 1993 in Long Beach, Los Angeles California.
+ 48 iv. Mary Elizabeth Ford, born February 14, 1914.


Generation No. 7

46. Roland Ford7 Jr. (Roland Hanford6 Ford, Smith Moses5, Richard4, Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born 1904. He married Virginia Unknown.

Notes for Roland Ford Jr.:
- Was set to go to Baker University on a sports scholarship of some kind, played golf and basketball
- Decided to take opportunity to be golf pro in Salina, Kansas instead
- Was bad with money
- Lost golf pro job; his father got him a job as a steward on a Fred Harvey dining car between Kansas City and southern California
- Married wife Virginia (who already had a daughter Jody), and moved to Santa Monica
- Both he and his wife were alcoholics
- They had only one child, stillborn



Child of Roland Jr. and Virginia Unknown is:
49 i. Stillborn8.


47. Guilford Claiborne7 Ford II (Roland Hanford6, Smith Moses5, Richard4, Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born March 22, 1909 in Kansas City, Missouri, and died October 30, 1993 in Long Beach, Los Angeles California. He married Fleta May Smith June 04, 1938 in Kansas City, Missouri, daughter of Harry Smith and Flora Kelley. She was born March 10, 1917 in Independence, Missouri, and died December 10, 1962 in Palos Verdes, California.

Notes for Guilford Claiborne Ford II:
- Born March 22, 1909, in Kansas City (1)
- Married Fleta May Smith June 4, 1938, in Kansas City (1)
- Children: Nancy Ann born July 23, 1940, in Minneapolis; Joan Marie born July 1, 1943, in Minneapolis
- Career in Purchasing Dept. with Shell Oil Company
- Lived in Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, New Jersey, Michigan, and California, due to company transfers
- Died October 30, 1993, in Long Beach, California



More About Guilford Claiborne Ford II:
Education: University of Missouri
Last ZIP: 1993, 90807 (Long Beach, Los Angeles California)

Children of Guilford Ford and Fleta Smith are:
+ 50 i. Nancy Ann8 Ford, born July 23, 1940 in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota.
51 ii. Joan Marie Ford, born July 01, 1943 in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota.


48. Mary Elizabeth7 Ford (Roland Hanford6, Smith Moses5, Richard4, Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born February 14, 1914. She married Arthur Maurer Abt. 1934. He died Abt. 1970.

Notes for Mary Elizabeth Ford:
- Decided to attend Mills College in Oakland CA, after hearing about it from a friend
- Began attendance at Mills at age 16, ~1930
- Was able to afford to go to Mills because transportation was free by train (due to her father's employment at Fred Harvey)
- Got into the elite English class at Mills based on test score
- Had to leave Mills after one year due to family financial setback caused by brother Hanford's tuberculosis expenses
- Attended University of Missouri after Mills
- Was offered newspaper job before graduation; took it in lieu of finishing degree
- Wrote feature articles and a syndicated column on women's sports (syndicated to Wichita and Acheson Kansas newspapers)
- Realizing that information on women's sports was scarce, she wrote a book on the subject
- Was sent to Tulsa Oklahoma to cover a golf tournament there
- Has taken other college classes in subsequent years
- Inherited an 8-story building in Kansas City, from her uncle Guilford (her father Roland's half brother)
- Converted the building to multiple units; received income from rents
- Has always been fascinated by the stock market
- Some years after her husband died, moved to current residence, "Atrium on the Plaza", a complex designed by Moshe Safdie, an Israeli/Canadian; passive-solar design
- Has enjoyed taking trips on freighters, and river cruises
- Paid for restoration of the clock in Union Station, and also a Butterfly Garden which is part of the Discovery Center Gardens in Kansas City




Notes for Arthur Maurer:
- Art's father had a 60,000-acre ranch 90 miles east of Colorado Springs
- Land was dry; required 30 acres for one cow/calf
- Art's father didn't live on the ranch; lived on a 2000-acre farm outside Parkville Missouri
- Art's father was a livestock expert, bought cattle for customers, then acquired a meat packing plant



Marriage Notes for Mary Ford and Arthur Maurer:
- Met at country club women's golf tournament; Mary recruited him as well as others to be social-event escorts for women participants
- Married when Mary was ~age 20 (~1934)
- Lived on a farm in Parkville Missouri early in their marriage: a 20-acre portion of Art's father's farm
- The farm grew cucumbers (and other things?)
- Had two horses, did a lot of riding
- Fixed up the farmhouse, had 3 children while living there
- Lived on the farm for ~10 years
- Art gave speeches in connection with his career; Mary wrote the speeches
- Art went to Washington during FDR's administration, as a "dollar a year man" in the WPA; this gave him access to government contracts
- Art's father died ~1945
- Art inherited ranch, meat business
- In 1945 Art & Mary moved to Kansas City Kansas, bought a large house on 5 acres from the original owner/architect; designed in an eclectic Northern-Italian style, on Indian Lane, using stone quarried on the property
- Meat business changed: irrigation allowed corn to be grown near where the cattle were raised, so feed lots were located there, and slaughtering and meat packing located there also
- Art and Mary got out of the ranching business but kept the mineral rights to the land; later oil was discovered on their land
- Art died ~1970 of a metastasized squamous-cell skin cancer on his neck



Children of Mary Ford and Arthur Maurer are:
+ 52 i. Karen8 Maurer, born 1938.
+ 53 ii. Ford Maurer, born 1940.
+ 54 iii. Susan Maurer, born 1943.
+ 55 iv. Craig Maurer, born 1946.


Generation No. 8

50. Nancy Ann8 Ford (Guilford Claiborne7, Roland Hanford6, Smith Moses5, Richard4, Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born July 23, 1940 in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota. She married John Burke Truher January 29, 1966 in San Antonio de Padua Mission, Jolon, California, son of James Truher and Helen Burke. He was born February 05, 1938 in Seattle, Washington.

More About Nancy Ann Ford:
Degree: 1961, BS in Microbiology, Stanford

More About John Burke Truher:
Degree: 1960, BS in Physics, Stanford

Marriage Notes for Nancy Ford and John Truher:
Per John Burke Truher, October, 2001:

"We were married at San Antonio de Padua mission, originally part of the 18th century Franciscan mission chain. We chose this location because we preferred simplicity and because the location was half-way between the Bay Area, where Nancy & I lived, and Los Angeles, where our families lived. I found an easy-going Franciscan priest there at the Jolon mission. We were guaranteed to have only close family in attendance, which was just fine all around. The mission is remote, historic, definitely picturesque.


This was about 30 miles West of King City, California, where I had been stationed at the Jolon Army base as artillery range safety officer briefly in 1961.


The mission was restored to original condition by William Randolf Hearst in the 1950s to it's 2nd construction of 1831. The mission is within walking distance to the "Hearst Hunting Lodge", a grand complex of shared housing, built by William Randolph Hearst, suitable for dozens of visitors. (This is NOT the "Hearst Castle" about 30 horseback (now SUV) miles southwest on the Pacific Coast.) The adjacent mission was also contained within territory then and now held by the U.S. Army.


Jolon is not much more than a little post office. The army complex and the mission both are listed as at the town of Jolon. Actually Jolon is a cross-roads with a gas station and a small general store (now vacant) with signs pointing to the Army administrative center, the firing ranges, a small airfield, over the hill to the Big Sur coast, or to the adjacent mission."



From the Internet:

"This mission is in a remote location, surrounded now on all sides by the government-owned Fort Hunter-Liggett. The Mission was plundered and later abandoned during the 19th century. Restorations were begun in the early 20th century and later by the Hearst Foundation in 1948. The Mission is located a few miles from the Hearst Hunting Lodge, designed by Julia Morgan in the Mission style. Today the property is owned by the Diocese of Monterey and maintained by the Franciscan Friars."



Children of Nancy Ford and John Truher are:
56 i. Nathaniel Luke9 Truher, born December 20, 1966 in Stanford Hospital, California.
+ 57 ii. Joel Burke Truher, born June 06, 1968 in Stanford Hospital, California.
+ 58 iii. Heather Lee Truher, born October 07, 1971 in Stanford Hospital, California.


52. Karen8 Maurer (Mary Elizabeth7 Ford, Roland Hanford6, Smith Moses5, Richard4, Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born 1938. She married Unknown Theobald.

Notes for Karen Maurer:
- Worked on Wall St., at Morgan Guarantee Bank
- Husband worked on Wall St. at Citibank, in charge of world-wide banking
- Stressful life style; now divorced
- Karen has suffered from depression as an adult, was in a facility in New Hampshire, somewhat better now, living in a semi-retirement place in New Jersey



Children of Karen Maurer and Unknown Theobald are:
59 i. David9 Theobald.

Notes for David Theobald:
degree from Harvard business school, mishandled Karen's funds

60 ii. Claire Theobald. She married Unknown.

Notes for Claire Theobald:
(Yale architecture degree, also advanced degree; had triplets of whom two survived; husband left)

61 iii. Steve Theobald, born in Australia.

Notes for Steve Theobald:
(born in Australia; a teacher; now lives in New York and is Karen's guardian)


53. Ford8 Maurer (Mary Elizabeth7 Ford, Roland Hanford6, Smith Moses5, Richard4, Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born 1940. He married Christine Unknown.

Children of Ford Maurer and Christine Unknown are:
62 i. Bo9 Maurer.
63 ii. Ashley Maurer.
64 iii. Unknown Maurer.


54. Susan8 Maurer (Mary Elizabeth7 Ford, Roland Hanford6, Smith Moses5, Richard4, Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born 1943. She married Unknown.

Notes for Susan Maurer:
- Now has rheumatoid arthritis; retired; does volunteer work

Child of Susan Maurer and Unknown is:
+ 65 i. Mimi9 Unknown.


55. Craig8 Maurer (Mary Elizabeth7 Ford, Roland Hanford6, Smith Moses5, Richard4, Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born 1946. He married Unknown.

Children of Craig Maurer and Unknown are:
66 i. Jacob9 Maurer.
67 ii. Bethany Maurer.


Generation No. 9

57. Joel Burke9 Truher (Nancy Ann8 Ford, Guilford Claiborne7, Roland Hanford6, Smith Moses5, Richard4, Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born June 06, 1968 in Stanford Hospital, California. He married Tammy Ziehm August 02, 1996 in San Francisco, California. She was born 1965.

More About Joel Burke Truher:
Degree: 1991, BS in Physics, UC Santa Clara
Fraternity: 1992, Phi Beta Kappa
Masters Degree: 1992, MS in Electrical Engineering, Stanford
Occupation: 2003, Chief Technology Officer, Epinions.com

Children of Joel Truher and Tammy Ziehm are:
68 i. Ryan Ziehm10 Truher, born March 01, 2003 in Sequoia Hospital, Redwood City, California.
69 ii. Molly Elizabeth Truher, born December 08, 2004 in Sequoia Hospital, Redwood City, California.


58. Heather Lee9 Truher (Nancy Ann8 Ford, Guilford Claiborne7, Roland Hanford6, Smith Moses5, Richard4, Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) was born October 07, 1971 in Stanford Hospital, California. She married Nathanael Cousins June 27, 1998. He was born February 21, 1970.

More About Heather Lee Truher:
Degree: 1993, BS in Human Biology, Stanford
Education: 1999, 2cnd Year in Medical School, University of Chicago

Children of Heather Truher and Nathanael Cousins are:
70 i. Amanda Claire10 Cousins, born August 19, 2000 in University of Chicago Hospital, Chicago, Cook County Illinois.
71 ii. Kate Audrey Cousins, born May 05, 2004 in Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California, 4:00 PM PDT.


65. Mimi9 Unknown (Susan8 Maurer, Mary Elizabeth7 Ford, Roland Hanford6, Smith Moses5, Richard4, Henry3, Richard2, Unknown1) She married Unkown.

Notes for Mimi Unknown:
(was a Merchandising major, now a sales person for Grainger)

Children of Mimi Unknown and Unkown are:
72 i. Ryan10 Unknown, born August 2004.
73 ii. Jack Unknown, born 2001.


• Sunday, January 9, 2005
• text modifications in progress
 The facts on this page in process of resolution or correction. Will be eliminated as resolved and completed. Actually some have already been corrected. I have yet to confirm they have been corrected and removed items from this list.
• Sunday, December 19, 2004
• 2004m1219 Genealogy Inventory Redundancy. √
 2004m1219 Concept for Trur-Burk Genealogy Inventory Redundancy.
  JBT has made some steps to meet these objectives. Each of these efforts has been limited and partially successful.
 1. Here's a few collections points for such hardcopy materials.

2. I have gathered all or nearly all, on-line resources into a single folder on my Mac which is regularly backed up to a separate hard-disk.

3. I have made one CD copy of this same Mac folder, which I gave to Phil Albert at our recent encounter at Joel Truher's house. I asked him to pass this folder to Mary Truher. As my genealogy folder grows or changes, I will issue replacement CDs to Mary and to other relatives.

4. I have a web site, Truher.Net with LunarPages with 1000 MB of storage capability at modest cost. This allows everything to be put online. It can easily be password protected.
 1. problem with centralization is that the materials are denied to other persons who might be actively accessing them, and putting source representations online.

2. another problem with centralization is that knowledge of the source materials disappear from attention of others

3.
 Problems with centralization of hard copy resource materials.
• Friday, October 10, 2003
• 2003m1010 READ THIS: How to navigate in this Notebook. √
 Navigate in the document using the tabs at right of each page. Step from one page to the next, or back, using the arrows at top-right of each page.
• Wednesday, October 8, 2003
• Florentine-Lietzau Truher, Descendants of (verbose)
 Descendants of Florentine Truher-Lietzau (rhh/jbt)

1 [9] Florentine TRUHER-LIETZAU Born: 1806 Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland) (?)

.. +Martin TRUHER Born: Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland) (?) Married: 1830 Died: Aft. 1836

.... 2 Gottlieb TRUHER Born: November 21, 1832 Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland) Died: December 05, 1904 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: 1904 Pioneer Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota

........ +Caroline PEIN Born: August 01, 1838 About 18 miles South Berlin, Germany Married: 1859 Danzig, Prussia (now Gdanz, Poland)??? Died: December 12, 1928 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: December 1928 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota, (Haack Plot)

.......... 3 August Louis "Gus" TRUHER Born: August 03, 1866 Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland) (?) Died: February 02, 1947 Honolulu, Hawaii (home of Helen Mary Truher Alderman) Burial: 1947 Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California

.............. +Helen Mary Nellie BARRETT Born: May 14, 1876 Austin, Minnesota Married: April 15, 1902 St. Augustine Roman Catholic Church, Austin, Minnesota Died: September 1945 Seattle, Washington Burial: 1945 Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California

................. 4 Helen Mary TRUHER Born: January 28, 1903 Austin, Minnesota Died: March 10, 1981 Santa Clara, California

..................... +Hugh ALDERMAN

................. 4 Louis Barrett TRUHER Born: September 22, 1904 Austin, Minnesota Died: February 14, 1952 San Diego, California Burial: 1946 Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California

..................... +Clara D. KOVAL Born: August 24, 1909 Died: January 28, 2000 Tacoma, Pierce County Washington Burial: February 03, 2000 Calvary Cemetery, Tacoma, Washington

....................... 5 Claire Louise TRUHER Born: 1942

................. 4 James Wilder TRUHER Born: April 15, 1907 Austin, Minnesota Died: December 14, 1990 Los Angeles, California Burial: Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California

..................... +Helen Kathryn BURKE, Ed.B., A.M., Ed.D. Born: December 23, 1910 Dayton Township, Richland County Wisconsin Married: November 14, 1931 Yuma, AZ Died: January 09, 1988 South Pasadena, California Burial: Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California

....................... 5 [1] James Wilder TRUHER, Jr. Born: December 10, 1934

........................... +JoAnn "Joby" NELSON Married: 1956 Divorced: 1984

.............................. 6 James Wilder TRUHER III Born: August 30, 1957

.................................. +Kathy ? Married: 1982

.................................... 7 James Wilder TRUHER IV Born: June 22, 1984 Loma Linda University Hospital, Loma Linda, San Bernadino County California

.............................. 6 Sarah Lee TRUHER Born: March 02, 1959

.............................. 6 Julie Ann TRUHER Born: July 26, 1960

.............................. 6 Mary Pat TRUHER Born: October 08, 1965

.................................. +Phil ALBERT Married: May 14, 1994 All Saints Episcopal Church, Pasadena, California

.................................... 7 Isabelle Kathryn ALBERT Born: August 16, 2000 California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, San Francisco County California

....................... *2nd Wife of [1] James Wilder TRUHER, Jr.:

........................... +Mary Lou ? Married: Abt. 1987

....................... 5 John Burke "Jack" TRUHER Born: February 05, 1938 Seattle, Washington

........................... +Nancy Ann FORD Born: July 23, 1940 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Married: January 29, 1966 San Antonio de Padua Mission, Jolon, California

.............................. 6 Nathaniel Luke TRUHER Born: December 20, 1966 Stanford Hospital, California

.............................. 6 Joel Burke TRUHER Born: June 06, 1968 Stanford Hospital, California

.................................. +Tammy ZIEHM Born: 1965 Married: August 02, 1996 San Francisco City Hall, California

.................................... 7 Ryan Ziehm TRUHER Born: March 01, 2003 Sequoia Hospital, Redwood City, California

.............................. 6 Heather Lee TRUHER Born: October 07, 1971 Stanford Hospital, California

.................................. +Nathaniel COUSINS Born: February 21, 1970 Married: June 27, 1998

.................................... 7 Amanda Claire COUSINS Born: August 19, 2000 University of Chicago Hospital, Chicago, Cook County Illinois

....................... 5 Terese Marie TRUHER Born: August 30, 1943 Seattle, Washington Died: August 30, 1943 Seattle, Washington Burial: St. Francis Xavier Mission Cemetery, Toledo, Lewis County Washington

....................... 5 Michael Barrett TRUHER Born: February 01, 1947 California

........................... +Sheryl KNOWTON Born: 1950 Married: 1975

................. 4 Florence May TRUHER Born: November 23, 1909 Tacoma, Washington Died: July 1977 San Francisco, California

..................... +Edward ? LEVASSEUR

....................... 5 Helen Mary LEVASSEUR

........................... +Greg HOMER

................. 4 Mary Gertrude TRUHER Born: November 23, 1909 Tacoma, Washington Died: October 07, 1991 Marian Residence, 124 South College Drive, Santa Maria, California 93454

.......... 3 Charles Edward TRUHER Born: August 11, 1870 Wisconsin Died: September 27, 1951 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: September 29, 1951 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.............. +Kate REED Married: Bef. 1913 Dubuque, Iowa Died: December 09, 1938 Dubuque, Dubuque County Iowa Burial: December 1938 Mount Olivet Cemetery, Dubuque, Dubuque County Iowa

.......... 3 Matheldie Helene "Aunt Till" TRUHER Born: January 22, 1873 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: October 06, 1962 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: October 09, 1962 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.............. +William F. FRANK Born: February 17, 1870 Brooklyn, New York Married: 1893 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: June 18, 1939 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

................. 4 Carl William FRANK Born: December 17, 1895 Hopkins, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: July 28, 1975 Burial: 1975 Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Hennepin County Minnesota

..................... +Dorothea Emilie Sophia "Dora" PINSKE Born: 1897 Married: November 27, 1919 Died: September 16, 1988 Burial: September 1988 Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Hennepin County Minnesota

................. 4 Arthur August FRANK Born: September 08, 1897 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: July 28, 1990 Houston, Harris County Texas Burial: 1990 Sunset Memorial Park, Minneapolis, Hennepin County Minnesota

..................... +Edith Anna Marie HAYDEN Born: December 10, 1897 Colorado Springs, El Paso County Colorado Married: October 25, 1921 Minneapolis, Hennepin County Minnesota Died: October 06, 1989 Houston, Harris County Texas Burial: 1989 Sunset Memorial Park, Minneapolis, Hennepin County Minnesota

....................... 5 Richard Hayden FRANK Born: October 23, 1922 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

........................... +Cleo Marie TREES Born: May 24, 1925 Belmond, Wright County Iowa Married: September 11, 1949 Belmond, Wright County Iowa

.............................. 6 Bruce Richard FRANK Born: June 22, 1951

.................................. +Deborah Ann LEWIS Born: October 12, 1953

.................................... 7 Justin Bruce FRANK Born: May 01, 1980 Tacoma, Washington

.................................... 7 Jared James FRANK Born: July 26, 1984

.............................. 6 [2] Gregory James FRANK Born: April 18, 1953

.................................. +Unknown ONE Married: Aft. 1973 Divorced: Bef. 1985 Before marriage of Gregory to Unknown Two

.............................. *2nd Wife of [2] Gregory James FRANK:

.................................. +Unknown TWO Married: Aft. 1985 Divorced: Bef. 1990 Before marriage of Gregory to Serap Cadan.

.................................... 7 Nicholas FRANK

.............................. *3rd Wife of [2] Gregory James FRANK:

.................................. +Serap CANDAN Born: December 22, 1967 Ankara, Turkey Married: Abt. 1990

.................................... 7 Alexandria Marie FRANK Born: December 10, 1991 Germany

.................................... 7 Alistair Taner FRANK Born: September 29, 1996 Alexandria, Virginia

....................... 5 Kenneth Arthur FRANK Born: August 18, 1926 Proctor, Saint Louis County Minnesota Died: November 10, 1998 Ely, Saint Louis County Minnesota Military service: Army Air Corps, World War II

........................... +Nancy Ann SHOREEN Born: November 10, 1930 Evanston, Cook County Illinois Married: March 11, 1950 Hopkins, Hennepin County Minnesota

.............................. 6 Scott Hayden FRANK Born: October 29, 1951 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.................................. +Sandra Jane SWENSON Married: November 10, 1973 Minneapolis, Hennepin County Minnesota

.................................... 7 Jennifer Noel FRANK Born: December 25, 1976 Edina, Hennepine County Minnesota

.................................... 7 Bryan Russel FRANK Born: September 06, 1980 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.................................... 7 Jason Kenneth FRANK Born: October 15, 1981 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.............................. 6 Kathryn FRANK Born: June 23, 1954 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: June 24, 1954 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.............................. 6 Christopher Bradley FRANK Born: October 27, 1955 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.................................. +Sanjuana Rojas CARREON Married: September 09, 1987 Houston, Harris County Texas

.................................... 7 Christian Arthur FRANK Born: June 20, 1996 Houston, Harris County Texas

.............................. 6 Michael Everett FRANK Born: January 03, 1964 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.................................. +Laurel Annette FLANERY Married: August 25, 1990 Irving, Dallas County Texas

.................................... 7 Aubrey Rose FRANK Born: December 22, 1998 Tomball, Harris County Texas

.............................. 6 Patrick Arthur FRANK Born: January 03, 1964 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota

................. 4 Herman L. FRANK Born: March 14, 1900 Died: January 04, 1982 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: January 06, 1982 Sunset Memorial Park, Minneapolis, Hennepin County Minnesota

..................... +Emma SCHLENTZ Born: 1896 Married: November 27, 1919 Died: March 15, 1982 St. Louis Park, Hennepin County Minnesota

.......... 3 Herman Adolph TRUHER Born: July 07, 1874 Died: July 22, 1874 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: 1874 Pilgrims Rest Cemetery, 34th and Forest Home, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Julius Albert TRUHER Born: July 07, 1874 Died: July 21, 1874 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: 1874 Pilgrims Rest Cemetery, 34th & Forest Home, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Augusta Amelia "Gussie" TRUHER Born: January 14, 1876 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: August 10, 1953 University of Minnesota Hospital, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: August 1953 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis (Haack Plot)

.............. +William Carl "Will" HAACK Born: November 20, 1873 Hokah, Houston County, Minnesota Married: June 16, 1896 Frederic S(?)ievess, German Lutheran Pastor, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: October 01, 1943 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: October 1943 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis (Haack Plot)

................. 4 [3] Herbert William "Herb" HAACK Born: January 01, 1898 3036 Snelling Avenue South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: February 14, 1961 5217 13th Avenue South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: February 17, 1961 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis

..................... +Marie "Babe" EDMONDSON Married: June 18, 1919 Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota Divorced: March 20, 1928 Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota.

................. *2nd Wife of [3] Herbert William "Herb" HAACK:

..................... +Eleanor Augusta Ida MUELLING Born: February 24, 1902 Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota Married: July 12, 1930 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: June 14, 1977 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: June 20, 1977 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Adj. Haack Plot

....................... 5 [4] Marlene Marceil HAACK Born: October 08, 1931 Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota

........................... +Donald George WONDRA Married: 1949 Esterville, Iowa Divorced: 1950 Saint Paul, Ramsey County Minnesota

....................... *2nd Husband of [4] Marlene Marceil HAACK:

........................... +Marlin Carroll CHRISTOFFERSON Born: February 01, 1927 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Married: April 18, 1953 Faith Lutheran Church, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota Died: August 23, 1990 Bloomington, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: August 1990 Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Fort Snelling, Hennepin County, Minnesota

.............................. 6 David Marlin CHRISTOFFERSON Born: February 22, 1955 Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota

.............................. 6 Mark Allen CHRISTOFFERSON Born: May 30, 1958 ?

.............................. 6 Steven Robert CHRISTOFFERSON Born: March 08, 1960 ?

....................... 5 Ronald Herbert "Ron" HAACK Born: June 18, 1937 Saint Paul, Ramsey County Minnesota

....................... 5 Allen Harold HAACK Born: September 19, 1944 Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota Died: December 1973 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: December 19, 1973 Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, near Haack Plot

........................... +Nancy SMITH Born: Unknown ? Married: August 31, 1973 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: Unknown ?

................. 4 [5] Delilah Henrietta "Dee" HAACK Born: November 27, 1899 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: August 20, 1983 Seattle, Washington

..................... +Albert BARAGAR Married: Seattle, Washington

................. *2nd Husband of [5] Delilah Henrietta "Dee" HAACK:

..................... +Leonard Lester DEUEL Born: June 20, 1892 Kirwin, Phillips County Kansas Married: April 20, 1919 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: February 19, 1967 Seattle, Washington

....................... 5 Leonard Lester DEUEL, Jr. Born: April 19, 1921 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: May 17, 2000 At his home, Olympia, Washington

........................... +Peggy Louise PARKINSON Born: October 26, 1925 Riverside, California Married: March 17, 1945 Santa Ana, California, First Congregational Church

.............................. 6 Lee Rae DEUEL Born: December 18, 1945 Orange, California

.................................. +Elihu Barnes SKINNER Born: January 18, 1938 New Britain, Connecticut Married: August 17, 1965 Amarillo, Texas

.................................... 7 Matthew Todd SKINNER Born: January 18, 1966 Amarillo, Texas

........................................ +Angelique FRIEND

........................................... 8 Zackery Joseph FRIEND-SKINNER Born: March 15, 1995 Olympia, Washington

.................................... 7 Amanda Millicent SKINNER Born: December 11, 1968

.............................. 6 [6] Lynn Anne DEUEL Born: December 18, 1945

.................................. +Gregory BROWN Married: Bef. 1967 Divorced: Aft. 1969

.................................... 7 Timothy David BROWN Born: November 30, 1967 Tacoma, Washington

.................................... 7 Christopher Max BROWN Born: May 07, 1969 Tacoma, Washington

.............................. *2nd Husband of [6] Lynn Anne DEUEL:

.................................. +Dale FRANCIS Married: Aft. 1969 Divorced: Aft. 1975

.............................. *3rd Husband of [6] Lynn Anne DEUEL:

.................................. +John REDIFER Married: Aft. 1980 Divorced: Aft. 1985

.............................. *4th Husband of [6] Lynn Anne DEUEL:

.................................. +Robert OTIS Married: Aft. 1986

.............................. 6 [7] John Wesley DEUEL Born: April 10, 1947

.................................. +Susan JENSEN Married: Bef. 1966 Divorced: Aft. 1968

.................................... 7 Kimberly DEUEL Born: July 31, 1966

.................................... 7 Gina DEUEL Born: October 07, 1967

........................................ +Joseph MOSES

........................................... 8 Jeremy MOSES Born: May 28, 1986

........................................... 8 Braison MOSES

.............................. *2nd Wife of [7] John Wesley DEUEL:

.................................. +Trisha ? Married: Aft. 1970 Divorced: Aft. 1975

.............................. *3rd Wife of [7] John Wesley DEUEL:

.................................. +Mary KANABAK Born: November 27, 1957 Married: Aft. 1980

.................................... 7 Rosalyne DEUEL Born: June 13, 1982

.................................... 7 Leonard P. DEUEL Born: June 26, 1985

.............................. 6 David Gene DEUEL Born: July 14, 1951 Orange, California

.................................. +Cara MCCUTCHAN Married: July 13, 1974 Divorced: 1976 Kenyon, Minnesota

.................................... 7 Amber Mariya DEUEL Born: October 02, 1975

........................................ +David KOCEMBA Married: September 11, 1999 McCutchan Farm, Minnesota

....................... 5 Gene Herbert DEUEL Born: June 28, 1926 Seattle, Washington (?) Died: January 1985 Cary, North Carolina

........................... +Loretta HATFIELD

.............................. 6 Donelle DEUEL

................. 4 Harold Carl HAACK Born: June 13, 1902 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Died: July 24, 1912 Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota Burial: 1912 Pioneer Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minnesota

.... 2 Jakob TRUHER Born: July 28, 1836 Danzig, Prussia (now Gdansk, Poland) Died: April 16, 1915 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: April 19, 1915 Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

........ +Emilie NEHRING Born: December 29, 1852 Married: December 12, 1875 St. Lucas Lutheran Church, Bayfield, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: August 07, 1931 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: 1931 Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Carl Wilhelm Friederich "Charles" TRUHER Born: October 19, 1876 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: November 08, 1949 Chicago, Illinois (?)

.............. +Bertha Amelia WILKE Born: January 27, 1877 Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin Married: June 17, 1899 St. Lucas Lutheran Church, Bayfield, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: February 21, 1952

................. 4 Harry F. TRUHER

..................... +Mary ?

................. 4 Clarence J. TRUHER Born: March 25, 1900 Died: April 1965 Chicago, Illinois (?)

..................... +?

....................... 5 Carol TRUHER

........................... +?

.............................. 6 Child One ?

.............................. 6 Child Two ?

................. 4 Dora Emilie Auguste TRUHER Born: August 16, 1902 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: February 1945 2515 North Talman Avenue, Chicago, Illinois

................. 4 Lawrence August TRUHER Born: September 09, 1907 Milwaukee, Wisconsin Died: November 25, 1983 Battle Creek Community Hospital, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, Michigan Burial: November 28, 1983 Acacia Park Cemetery, 7800 West Irving Park Road, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois 60634-2135, 773-625-7800

..................... +Jean MARKLEY Born: July 10, 1912 Chicago, Illinois Married: June 06, 1936 Geneva, Illinois Died: August 02, 1987 Battle Creek, Michigan Burial: 1987 Acacia Park Cemetery, 7800 West Irving Park Road, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois 60634-2135, 773-625-7800

....................... 5 Laurene Evelyn "Laurie" TRUHER Born: June 11, 1944 Chicago, Illinois

........................... +Robert SWANSON Born: April 13, 1940 Married: November 26, 1966 Our Saviour's Lutheran Church, Chicago, Illinois

................. 4 Evelyn M. TRUHER Born: March 17, 1918 Died: February 1976 Island Lake, Illinois

..................... +William David FLOWERS Born: July 23, 1918 Died: August 28, 1976 Island Lake, Illinois

....................... 5 [8] Dianne Carle FLOWERS

........................... +Robert PIERSON

....................... *2nd Husband of [8] Dianne Carle FLOWERS:

........................... +Dennis EVANS

.............................. 6 Timothy EVANS

.............................. 6 Suzanne EVANS

.............................. 6 Daniel EVANS

....................... 5 James David FLOWERS

........................... +Terree ?

.............................. 6 Kelly FLOWERS

................. 4 Charles A. TRUHER Born: May 20, 1920 Died: March 1975 Chicago, Illinois

.......... 3 Caroline Wilhelmine Henriette TRUHER Born: October 16, 1877 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: February 24, 1965

.............. +Charles SCHROT Married: June 26, 1897 St. Lucas Lutheran Church, Bayfield, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: May 02, 1955

................. 4 Nancy SCHROT

..................... +? RAEDLEIN

................. 4 Friedrich Georg SCHROT Born: June 30, 1898

..................... +RUTH

....................... 5 Beverly SCHROT

........................... +? WILL

................. 4 Karl Reinhold SCHROT Born: February 28, 1901 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: January 1975

................. 4 Edwin Otto Wilhelm SCHROT Born: August 29, 1902 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

..................... +Alma ?

....................... 5 Ronald SCHROT Born: Unknown

................. 4 Georg Harold SCHROT Born: October 19, 1905 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: September 03, 1910 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Auguste Emilie TRUHER Born: July 16, 1879 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.............. +Franz JENRICH Married: January 09, 1897 156 Lenox Street, Bay View, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

................. 4 Walter Karl Fredrich JENRICH Born: March 02, 1897 Died: December 1980

................. 4 Frieda Karoline Wilhelmine JENRICH Born: January 12, 1899

................. 4 Herbert Jakob Albert JENRICH Born: September 06, 1900

................. 4 Arthur Wilhelm Hermann JENRICH Born: March 25, 1902 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

................. 4 Edna Flora Karoline JENRICH Born: September 01, 1908 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

................. 4 Wilhelm Edwin Harry JENRICH Born: May 27, 1912 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

................. 4 Lorenz Leonard August JENRICH Born: August 06, 1913 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

................. 4 Harold Ernest Edwin JENRICH Born: December 28, 1916 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Friedrich Wilhelm August TRUHER Born: March 07, 1881 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Wilhelm Herman "Willie" TRUHER Born: March 30, 1884 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.............. +Anna SCHEWE Born: 1885 Married: October 26, 1910 St. Lucas Lutheran Church, Bayfield, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.......... 3 August C. TRUHER Born: August 26, 1885 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: April 20, 1968 Burial: 1968 Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.............. +Emma WILDEBRANDT Born: July 08, 1885 Died: January 10, 1973 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: 1973 Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

................. 4 Norma Emilie TRUHER Born: March 10, 1908 Town Lake, Wisconsin Died: August 1991

..................... +Edward KLUG

................. 4 Child ? TRUHER Born: 1915 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: November 12, 1915 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: November 1915 Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Hermann Edward TRUHER Born: June 08, 1888 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: November 03, 1941 Burial: November 1941 Wood National Cemetery, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Flora Helena Emilie TRUHER Born: March 04, 1890 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.............. +Leonhard SCHMIDT Married: October 15, 1912 St. Lucas Lutheran Church, Bayfield, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Edwin Franz Jakob TRUHER Born: February 05, 1892 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: April 11, 1917 Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Burial: April 15, 1917 Woodlawn Cemetery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Arthur Reinhold Emil TRUHER Born: February 24, 1894 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Died: March 12, 1894 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

*2nd Husband of [9] Florentine TRUHER-LIETZAU:

.. +Johann LIETZAU, Sr. Born: 1812 Married: Abt. 1842

.... 2 [10] Johann LIETZAU, Jr. Born: 1843

........ +?

.... *2nd Wife of [10] Johann LIETZAU, Jr.:

........ +Amelia BURANDT Born: 1842

.......... 3 Ernest Edward John LIETZAU Born: 1869

.......... 3 Olga K. LIETZAU Born: 1872

.......... 3 Adolph LIETZAU Born: 1873

.......... 3 Albert Otto LIETZAU Born: 1875

.......... 3 Emilie LIETZAU Born: October 28, 1875 Bay View (Milwaukee), Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

.......... 3 Fred LIETZAU Born: 1877

.......... 3 Emil LIETZAU Born: 1879

.......... 3 Heinrich Amadeus LIETZAU Born: 1880

.......... 3 Laura LIETZAU Born: 1885

.......... 3 Bertha M. LIETZAU Born: 1887

.... *3rd Wife of [10] Johann LIETZAU, Jr.:

........ +Enestine Emma ?

.... 2 Caroline LIETZAU Born: October 10, 1849 Germany Died: November 11, 1923 Ada, Norman County Minnesota Burial: November 1923 St. John's Lutheran Cemetery, Green Meadow Twp, Norman County Minnesota

........ +Gustave E. PINSKE Born: October 22, 1847 Germany Married: June 11, 1876 Glencoe, McLeod County Minnesota Died: December 31, 1911 Crookston Hospital, Crookston Minnesota Burial: St. John's Lutheran Cemetery, Green Meadow Twp, Norman County Minnesota

.......... 3 Theodore Hermann PINSKE Born: December 31, 1878 Acoma Township, McLeod County Minnesota Died: May 28, 1965 Burial: STRAND CEM

.............. +MATTA HABEDANK Born: August 13, 1881 Married: May 18, 1892 Died: February 10, 1931 Burial: STRAND CEM, Norman, MN

................. 4 MERLIN PINSKE

................. 4 AGNES EMMA PINSKE Born: October 15, 1905 Died: 1982

..................... +FRED JANUSCH Married: August 01, 1929 OGEMA, MN Died: Aft. 1982

....................... 5 JANUSCH

....................... 5 JANUSCH

....................... 5 JANUSCH

....................... 5 JANUSCH

................. 4 LOUIS IRWIN KARL PINSKE Born: December 26, 1907 Died: 1973 MPLS, MN

..................... +ALICE SCHAUFBUCK

................. 4 BERNHARDT GUSTAV WILHELM PINSKE Born: January 09, 1909 Died: Bef. January 29, 1989

..................... +GLADYS ELLINGSWORTH Born: GARY, Norman, MN

....................... 5 PINSKE

....................... 5 PINSKE

....................... 5 PINSKE

....................... 5 PINSKE

....................... 5 PINSKE

....................... 5 PINSKE

................. 4 ALICE FRIEDERIKE CAROLINE PINSKE Born: January 22, 1910

..................... +ED SCHAUFBUCK Died: 1987

....................... 5 SCHAUFBUCK

................. 4 DELILAH VIOLA PINSKE Born: June 23, 1911

..................... +GEORGE STANFORD

....................... 5 STANFORD

................. 4 MABEL MINNIE CATHERINE PINSKE Born: August 22, 1912 Died: September 09, 1961 WHITE MEM HOSP, LOS ANGELES, LOS ANGELES, CA Burial: ,,,MN

................. 4 IRWIN THEODORE HENRY PINSKE Born: March 14, 1914

................. 4 VIOLA CHRISTINE PINSKE Born: September 03, 1916

..................... +CLARENCE WIEGMANN

................. 4 MARJORIE ELEANORA PINSKE Born: February 09, 1925

..................... +LEN HUTCHINS

.......... 3 Hulda Maria Magdalena PINSKE Born: June 18, 1880 Died: May 14, 1892 Wild Rice Township, Norman County Minnesota

.............. +BULOW

................. 4 BULOW

................. 4 BULOW

................. 4 BULOW

.......... 3 Albert PINSKE Born: November 26, 1881 Died: January 21, 1927

.......... 3 Rosalie Johanna PINSKE Born: February 16, 1884 TWIN VALLEY, NORMAN CO. MN USA Died: October 08, 1959 INGLEWOOD, LOS ANGELES, CA, USA Burial: HARMONY SECTION, FOREST LAWN, GLENDALE, CA

.............. +Harry Leroy GILL Born: 1878 Married: June 12, 1907 ADA, NORMAN CO, MN Died: November 27, 1959 LOS ANGELES, LOS ANGELES, CA Burial: HARMONY SECTION, FOREST LAWN, GLENDALE

................. 4 HALLEY HARRISON GILL Born: September 19, 1910 ADA, Norman, MN Died: March 17, 1982 ADA, Norman, MN Burial: ADA CEM, ADA, Norman, MN

................. 4 CORRIAL BEATRICE GILL Born: May 29, 1912 ADA, Norman, MN Died: May 29, 1995

................. 4 GENEVIEVE ROSABELLE GILL Born: September 19, 1915 ADA, Norman, MN

................. 4 DE VOIL SARAH CAROLINE GILL Born: November 17, 1917 ADA, Norman, MN

................. 4 ELSIE LORRAINE GILL Born: July 16, 1920 ADA, Norman, MN

................. 4 DONALD CHASWILL GILL Born: July 26, 1922 ADA, Norman, MN

................. 4 Palmetta Lauretta "Pat" GILL Born: 1925

..................... +Walter Otto "Walt" SCHONBORG Born: 1923

................. 4 VIOLET VELORIS GILL * Born: January 28, 1927 GREEN MEADOW TWN, NORMAN CO, MN, USA

..................... +KERMIT HOWRIE "Tim" ENANDER * Born: March 18, 1922 PAYNESVILLE, STEARNS CO, MN, USA Married: November 09, 1946 BETHEL LUTH CH, LOS ANGELES, LOS ANGELES CO, CA

....................... 5 ANITA KAY ENANDER Born: December 05, 1952 LOS GATOS, SANTA CLARA CO, CA

........................... +MICHAEL GENE TUCKER Born: March 17, 1951 DAVENPORT, SCOTT CO, IA Married: February 04, 1978 SAN JOSE, SAN JOSE CO, CA

.............................. 6 ERICA MICHELLE TUCKER Born: December 16, 1988

.............................. 6 LINNEA KRISTINE TUCKER) Born: December 16, 1988 STANFORD HOSP, CA Died: December 17, 1988 STANFORD HOSP, CA

....................... 5 LAURA LINNEA ENANDER Born: June 22, 1955

.......... 3 Robert Heinrich PINSKE Born: October 20, 1885 Died: August 18, 1893

.......... 3 Herman August PINSKE Born: April 30, 1887 Died: December 06, 1918

.......... 3 Johannes Adolph Reinhold PINSKE Born: May 05, 1890 Died: October 22, 1890

.......... 3 James A. PINSKE Born: Aft. 1890 Died: Aft. 1890

.......... 3 ? PINSKE Born: Unknown Died: Abt. 1900



&
&
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• 2003m1010 READ THIS: How to navigate in this Notebook. √
 The software to make my Journal is called NoteTaker, by Aquaminds, now only for mac OS X, ; at http://www.aquaminds.com/index.jsp . NoteTaker allows easy entry of text, photos, sound, and multi-media.
 When in doubt, click on the bullet when you see it inside the notebook, appearing as at left. Each text entry block in this notebook begins with a circular bullet point, which may have a "+" or a "-", or "nothing" inside.

If you see a "+" inside any bullet point, click on the symbol for more detail on the same sub-topic.

If you see a "-" inside the bullet point, click on that symbol to absorb and hide indented content. You will get a better view of the outline topics.

If you see nothing inside the circular bullet point, or only a line of text, then clicking on the bullet point may expand a text box that has been collapsed by the author (usually inadvertently) or because all or some part of the document has been collapsed.

Practice with the bullet point for this block of text, see how the indented paragraph just below is absorbed and hidden or opened. This notebook is in outline format, which behaves differently as described from a standard text document.
• Tuesday, October 7, 2003
• Thomas Burke, Descendants report √
 Descendants of James Burke
 1 James BURKE Born: Ireland Died: 1866 Dayton, Tippecanoe County Indiana

.. +? Died: New York


.... 2 Thomas BURKE Born: 1831 Bally Griffen, County Tipperary, Ireland Died: April 02, 1883 Richland Center, Wisconsin Burial: April 1883 Catholic Cemetery, Richland Center, Wisconsin Military service: Indiana Regiment, U.S. Civil War


........ +Catherine "Kate" STAPLETON Born: 1835 Bally Griffen, Tipperary County, Ireland Married: June 27, 1857 Tippecanoe County Indiana Died: September 03, 1908 Richland Center, Wisconsin Burial: September 1908 Catholic Cemetery, Richland Center, Wisconsin


.......... 3 Hannorah BURKE Born: 1859 Dayton, Tippecanoe County Indiana


.............. +Patrick MANNING


................. 4 Catherine "Kate" MANNING


................. 4 Timothy Theron MANNING Born: July 07, 1878


..................... +Lydia Mae LEFFLER Married: January 14, 1904


.......... 3 Thomas BURKE Born: December 22, 1861 Dayton, Tippecanoe County Indiana Died: November 19, 1936 Marshall, Wisconsin


.............. +Etta BRIGGS Married: February 26, 1895 Richland Center, Wisconsin


.......... 3 James Daniel BURKE Born: March 06, 1864 Lafayette, Tippecanoe County, Indiana Died: October 15, 1924 Torrence, California Burial: October 1924 Richland Center, Wisconsin


.............. +Catherine Mary "Kate" MURPHY Born: November 13, 1871 Chicago, Illinois Married: November 06, 1888 Richland Center, Wisconsin Died: August 1955 Altadena, California Burial: 1955 Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California


................. 4 Leo Glen BURKE Born: April 29, 1890 Richland Center, Wisconsin Died: April 14, 1964 Pasadena, California, Home of Helen Burke Truher Burial: 1964 Possibly Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California


..................... +Mayme J. STADELE Born: 1895 Married: May 06, 1914 Muscada, Wisconsin Died: 1967


....................... 5 James A. BURKE Born: December 31, 1916 Richland Center, Wisconsin Died: May 1981 Richland Center, Wisconsin


........................... +Helen M. ENGENDORF Born: 1920


................. 4 James Daniel BURKE, Jr. Born: March 24, 1894 Dayton Township, Richland County Wisconsin Died: September 25, 1909 Richland County, Wisconsin


................. 4 Edna Mary BURKE Born: January 15, 1902 Richland County, Wisconsin Died: April 09, 1963 Pasadena, California, Home of Helen Burke Truher Burial: 1963 Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California


..................... +Donald A. NASBY


................. 4 Milo Francis BURKE Born: December 04, 1904 Richland Township, Richland County Wisconsin Died: December 20, 1978 Pasadena, California, Home of Helen Burke Truher Burial: 1978 Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California


..................... +Virginia (?) ALBERTS


....................... 5 Robert BURKE


....................... 5 Bonita BURKE


................. 4 Helen Kathryn BURKE, EdD Born: December 23, 1910 Dayton Township, Richland County Wisconsin Died: January 09, 1988 South Pasadena, California Burial: Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California


..................... +James Wilder TRUHER Born: April 15, 1907 California Married: November 14, 1931 Yuma, AZ Died: December 14, 1990 California Burial: Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California


....................... 5 [1] James Wilder TRUHER, Jr. Born: December 10, 1934


........................... +JoAnn "Joby" NELSON Married: 1956 Divorced: 1984


....................... *2nd Wife of [1] James Wilder TRUHER, Jr.:


........................... +Mary Lou ? Married: Abt. 1987


....................... 5 John Burke "Jack" TRUHER Born: February 05, 1938 Seattle, Washington


........................... +Nancy FORD Born: July 23, 1940 Married: January 29, 1966


....................... 5 Terese Marie TRUHER Born: August 30, 1943 Seattle, Washington Died: August 30, 1943 Seattle, Washington Burial: Catholic Cemetery, Winlock, Washington, near Seattle


....................... 5 Michael Barrett TRUHER Born: February 01, 1947 California


........................... +Sheryl KNOWTON Born: 1950 Married: 1975


.......... 3 Margaret BURKE Born: 1868 Dayton, Tippecanoe County Indiana Died: September 22, 1933 Chicago, Illinois


.............. +John "Jack" O'KEEFE Married: Abt. 1899 Chicago, Cook County, Illinois


.......... 3 John BURKE Born: November 14, 1870 Dayton Township, Richland County Wisconsin Died: January 04, 1944 Richland Center, Wisconsin


.............. +Hannah O'KEEFE Married: 1906 Chicago, Cook County, Illinois


.......... 3 Patrick BURKE Born: May 14, 1873 Richland Center, Wisconsin Died: June 13, 1911 Eagle Township, Richland County Wisconsin


.............. +Elizabeth BURTON


.......... 3 Michael Francis BURKE Born: September 18, 1877 Richland Center, Wisconsin Died: June 13, 1911 Eagle Township, Richland County Wisconsin


.............. +Rose HARRIS Married: November 27, 1902 Richland Center, Wisconsin
• 2003m1007 Vitae (terse) on Jack Truher √
• Vitae on Jack Truher. √

Jack Truher was born in Seattle, Washington in 1938; attended elementary and high school in Pasadena,California; then Stanford University, leaving with a B.S. in physics in 1960. After a few years as a physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and as a reserve missile officer with the United States Army, Jack joined the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in 1965. At SLAC for 31 years, here is how some of
Jack's varied concentrations contributed to various aspects of high energy accelerator and especially magneto-optical beam delivery systems. This work is derived from a branch of applied physics called accelerator physics.

Jack lives in Los Altos, California 94024, at 10569 Creston Drive. Phone is 408-732-1859, Email <
jack@truher.net >.

• 2003m1007 Vitae (terse) on Ron Haack √
 Ron Haack is a 2nd cousin to Jack Truher. Our grandparents, August and Augusta Truher, were siblings. Ron has made many contributions to the genealogies described in this notebook.

Ron Haack was born in Saint Paul, Minnesota in 1937, attended high school in Saint Paul, Macalester College in Saint Paul, then the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis with a five year degree in Electrical Engineering. After a few moves around the Midwest for about 6 years, Ron joined GE in Cincinnati in 1966 in the Aircraft Engine Division, Engine Controls Department. Engine Controls moved to Fort Wayne, Indiana in 1985. Ron moved with it, and has remained there ever since. Ron retired from GE in about 1993.

Ron Haack lives in Fort Wayne, Indiana 46804-1481, at 1715 Kinross Lane; home phone is 219-432-1819 (You will ALWAYS get an answering machine; picked up for recognized callers, if Ron is home).

Vitae on Ron Haack from his email July 7, 2000.
• Florentine Lietzau-Truher, Descendants report for (terse)
   1 Florentine ? Truher-Lietzau (1806 - ) (rhh/jbt)
      1 Gottlieb Truher (1832 - 1904)
          1 August Louis Truher (1866 - 1947)
              1 Helen Mary Truher (1903 - 1981)
              2 Louis Barrett Truher (1904 - 1946)
                  1 Claire Louise Truher (1942 - )
              3 James Wilder Truher (1907 - 19901990)
                  1 James Wilder Truher Jr. (1934 - )
                      1 James Wilder Truher III (1957 - )
                          1 James Wilder Truher IV (1984 - )
                      2 Sarah Lee Truher (1959 - )
                      3 Julie Ann Truher (1960 - )
                      4 Mary Pat Truher (1965 - )
                  2 John Burke Truher (1938 - )
                      1 Nathaniel Luke Truher (1966 - )
                      2 Joel Burke Truher (1968 - )
                      3 Heather Lee Truher (1971 - )
                  3 Terese Marie Truher (1943 - 1943)
                  4 Michael Barrett Truher (1947 - )
              4 Florence May Truher (1909 - 1977)
                  1 Helen Mary Levasseur ( - )
              5 Mary Gertrude Truher Sister (1909 - 1991)
          2 Charles Edward Truher (1870 - 1951)
          3 Matheldie Helene Truher (1873 - 1962)
              1 Carl W. Frank (1895 - 1975)
              2 Herman L.Frank (1900 - ca. 1982)
              3 Arthur A. Frank (1902 - 1975)
                  1 Richard H. Frank (1923 - )
                  2 Mona Hayden (1923 - )
                  3 Mary Hayden (1925 - )
                  4 Kenneth A. Frank (1926 - 1998)
                      1 Chris Frank ( - )
                      2 Kathryn Frank ( - )
                      3 Michael Frank ( - )
                      4 Pat Frank ( - )
                      5 Scott Frank ( - )
          4 Herman Adolph Truher (1874 - 1874)
          5 Julius Albert Truher (1874 - 1874)
          6 Augusta Amelia Truher (1876 - 1953)
              1 Herbert William Haack (1898 - 1961)
                  1 Marlene Marceil Haack (1931 - )
                      1 David Marlin Christofferson (1955 - )
                      2 Mark Allen Christofferson (1958 - )
                      3 Steven Robert Christofferson (1960 - )
                  2 Ronald Herbert Haack (1937 - )
                  3 Allen Harold Haack (1944 - 1973)
              2 Delilah Henrietta Haack (1899 - 1983)
                  1 Marjorie Gray ( - )
                  2 Leonard Lester Deuel Jr. (1921 - 2000)
                      1 Lee Rae Deuel (1945 - )
                          1 Matthew Todd Skinner (1966 - )
                              1 Zackery Joseph Friend- Skinner (1995 - )
                          2 Amanda Millicent Skinner (1968 - )
                      2 Lynn Anne Deuel (1945 - )
                          1 Timothy David Brown (1967 - )
                          2 Christopher Max Brown (1969 - )
                      3 John Wesley Deuel (1947 - )
                          1 Kimberly Deuel (1966 - )
                          2 Gina Deuel (1967 - )
                              1 Braison Moses ( - )
                              2 Jeremy Moses (1986 - )
                          3 Rosalyne Deuel (1982 - )
                          4 Leonard Deuel (1985 - )
                      4 David Gene Deuel (1951 - )
                          1 Amber Mariya Deuel (1975 - )
                  3 Gene Herbert Deuel (1926 - 1985)
                      1 Donelle Deuel ( - )
              3 Harold Carl Haack (1902 - 1912)
      2 Jakob Truher (1836 - 1915)
          1 Carl Wilhelm Friederich Truher (1876 - 1949)
              1 Harry F. Truher ( - )
              2 Clarence J. Truher (1900 - 1965)
                  1 Carol Truher ( - )
                      1 Child One ? ( - )
                      2 Child Two ? ( - )
              3 Dora Emilie Auguste Truher (1902 - 1945)
              4 Lawrence August Truher (1907 - 1983)
                  1 Laurene Evelyn Truher (1944 - )
              5 Evelyn M. Truher (1918 - 1976)
                  1 Dianne Flowers ( - )
                      1 Child Four Pierson ( - )
                      2 Child One Pierson ( - )
                      3 Child Three Pierson ( - )
                      4 Child Two Pierson ( - )
                  2 James Flowers ( - )
                      1 Child One Flowers ( - )
              6 Charles A. Truher (1920 - 1975)
          2 Caroline Wilhelmine Henriette Truher (1877 - 1965)
              1 Nancy Schrot ( - )
              2 Friedrich Georg Schrot (1898 - )
                  1 Beverly Schrot ( - )
              3 Karl Reinhold Schrot (1901 - 1975)
              4 Edwin Otto Wilhelm Schrot (1902 - )
                  1 Ronald Schrot ( - )
              5 Georg Harold Schrot (1905 - 1910)
          3 Auguste Emilie Truher (1879 - )
              1 Walter Karl Fredrich Jenrich (1897 - 1980)
              2 Frieda Karoline Wilhelmine Jenrich (1899 - )
              3 Herbert Jakob Albert Jenrich (1900 - )
              4 Arthur Wilhelm Hermann Jenrich (1902 - )
              5 Edna Flora Karoline Jenrich (1908 - )
              6 Wilhelm Edwin Harry Jenrich (1912 - )
              7 Lorenz Leonard August Jenrich (1913 - )
              8 Harold Ernest Edwin Jenrich (1916 - )
          4 Friedrich Wilhelm August Truher (1881 - )
          5 Wilhelm Herman Truher (1884 - )
          6 August C. Truher (1885 - 19681968)
              1 Norma Emilie Truher (1908 - 1991)
              2 Child ? Truher (1915 - 1915)
          7 Hermann Edward Truher (1888 - )
          8 Flora Helena Emilie Truher (1890 - )
          9 Edwin Franz Jakob Truher (1892 - 1917)
         10 Arthur Reinhold Emil Truher (1894 - 1894)
      3 Johann Lietzau Jr. (1843 - )
          1 Ernest Edward John Lietzau (1869 - )
          2 Olga K. Lietzau (1872 - )
          3 Adolph Lietzau (1873 - )
          4 Albert Otto Lietzau (1875 - )
          5 Emilie Lietzau (1875 - )
          6 Fred Lietzau (1877 - )
          7 Emil Lietzau (1879 - )
          8 Heinrich Amadeus Lietzau (1880 - )
          9 Laura Lietzau (1885 - )
         10 Bertha M. Lietzau (1887 - )
      4 Caroline Lietzau (1849 - )
          1 ? Pinske ( - )
          2 infant one Pinske ( - )
          3 infant two Pinske ( - )
          4 Theodore Hermann Pinske (1878 - )
          5 Hulda Maria Magdalena Pinske (1880 - 1891)
          6 Albert Pinske (1881 - )
          7 Rosalie Johanna Pinske (1884 - )
              1 Palmetta Lauretta Gill (1925 - )
          8 Robert Heinrich Pinske (1885 - )
          9 Herman Pinske (1887 - )
         10 James A. Pinske (1890 - )
         11 Johannes Adolph Reinhold Pinske (1890 - )
----------------------------------------------------
Descendant report created by Gene 4.2.1, Thu, Jul 19, 2001
• 2003m0711 Some voice recordings in this Notebook.
• <a href="attachments/NoteTaker-2003_10_07-12_16.mp3">NoteTaker-2003_10_07-12_16.mp3</a>

Recorded Tuesday, October 07, 2003 12:16:14. Duration 00:13
• Tuesday, September 9, 2003
• 2003m0711 Some voice recordings in this Notebook.
 Play any MP3 voice recordings such as the one just here

• Wednesday, August 13, 2003
• 2003m1010 READ THIS: How to navigate in this Notebook. √
 Come back and check on me occasionally. Let me know if you have a reaction to something you find here.

-- Jack Truher <
jack@truher.net >
2010m0904
 From a content page, jump to various pages by clicking on the diamond at left of each text entry. The year or origin, month, and date of each entry are shown in that order.
• Saturday, May 17, 2003
• 2003m1010 READ THIS: How to navigate in this Notebook. √
 To get started, just click on the cover page. You will be be taken to the main Contents page, or go there by using tabs at right of page.

If viewing on a browser, note that links may open in your browser tabs.

IMPORTANT: This document is in Outline format. You navigate differently from a standard text document. You will need to expand or collapse sections of text. To learn how to do this, g
o to the "Introduction, How To" tab section, and read the page "IMPORTANT: How to navigate in this Notebook."