Documents
• gif
• Gottlieb & Karoline Truher immigrants arrive in New York, July 8, 1870
• 3-Gottlieb & Karoline - another formulation --

Here's is email text connecting Bogenschneider's we text as from an email Jack to a few on or about 2010m0903.

We know from other document in this folder that August Truher arrived in New York July 8, 1870.

Jack starts out tonight with picture Ron and I have had for years. Lots more on the web now. So we wind up with some outstanding representations of a sister ship (meaning same technology & general appearance),

San Salvador, to August Truher's Western Metropolis

2010m0903

Start with

image Then work on that image

The sail-and-steam Western Metropolis used an engine of the "walking beam" type. Note the xxxxmast(?) rising through the deckhead of her wheelhouse.

http://www.hylandgranby.com/marine_antiques_paintings_details.asp?itemID=PA0693 ==
image

San Salvador

image

San Salvador


================================================
http://images.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/results?itype=Prints&q=Buffalo&fz=0

image
WESTERN METROPOLIS
imageimage  1895 ... WESTERN METROPOLIS Built 1856, at Buffalo, N. Y. HULL, of wood, by Bidwell, Banta & Co.; 340 feet over all; 40 feet beam, and 18 feet depth of hold. Tonnage 1,860 ONE BEAM ENGINE, by Merrick & Towne, Philadelphia, PA., diameter of cylinder 76 1/4 inches, by 12 feet stroke TWO BOILERS...

http://images.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/811/data?n=22

image

see full image,
Western Metropolis-EXT00419f,

http://images.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/811/image/2713?n=22


image
• HBT Photo Album PA1 √ Jim2-Jack 1930s-1940s (pics and text)
 Still -- No phone service at Silverton in 2001
Thursday, November 29, 2001


By <mailto:mikelewis@seattlepi.com >

MIKE LEWIS

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER


This 2001 story is available online, complete with graphics.

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/48616_phones29.shtml

SILVERTON -- Invariably the question comes. While buying cassette tapes at Radio Shack or applying for a credit card. When writing a check for two weeks' worth of groceries after a 20-mile drive to the store or when meeting a new friend.

image

Diane Boyd knows it will be asked, so sometimes she lies.

"How do you tell people you don't have a phone number?" she wondered, smiling. "They always look at you funny, like you are from another planet. So sometimes I just make one up."

For 13 years, Boyd has wanted a phone number. She just can't have one -- yet. Neither can the 50 other residents of Silverton, a former silver and copper mining village surrounded by the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest.

In one of the most-wired states in the nation, a place where Internet access is considered a Gates-given right, Silverton remains one of the largest communities in the state -- and one of a few in the country -- without phone service.

No cell phones. No Internet. Not even a late-night wrong number.

But with a little luck, a fast snowmelt and a willing Seattle company, residents next summer will get the opportunity to screen calls from relatives, enjoy dinnertime interruptions and download e-mail spam.

They'll also be able to call 911, check on their families, look for jobs and, finally, stop lying to the counter help in electronics stores.

"It isn't asking too much," said Boyd, a U.S. Forest Service employee who lives here year round. "You see these commercials with some company bragging about Internet access in Katmandu, and I can't even make a call from Silverton, Washington."

Bob Shirley, a telecommunications analyst for the state's Utilities and Transportation Commission who has helped other remote Washington towns without phone service find willing companies, secure financing and run lines, called the situation, "unusual."


image
 
Gulf War veteran Jay Murray places a flag near the driveway to his family's home in Silverton. The town is scheduled to receive phone service next summer. Paul Joseph Brown / Seattle Post-Intelligencer



<
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/photos/photo.asp?PhotoID=7405

Click for larger photo


And even though the state and federal governments have programs to encourage "universal access," some towns still fall through the cracks.

"That is what has happened with Silverton," Shirley said. "It you are in a world without telephones, I guess it wouldn't be a big deal, but here it makes you a bit of an odd ball."

That oddball status could soon end.

Joel Eisenberg, founder of Seattle-based International Telecom LTD, learned about Silverton's plight and founded Beaver Creek Telephone Co.

A project too small to interest the large carriers in Washington's $3 billion phone market, Beaver Creek is small enough to want the low profit in spending roughly $1 million to run a fiber-optic cable from Silverton into the nearest phone line, a GTE cable that ends at a Verlot pay phone 11 miles west of town.

For Boyd and the 20 or so full-time residents of Silverton, the $50 monthly bill can't come soon enough.

She and her husband, Denny, run the town's telecommunications link to the outside world: a Forest Service emergency phone that sits in a corner of their enclosed porch.

If the Boyds aren't home when someone's house catches on fire or when one of the thousands of motorists who pass by on the Mountain Loop Highway breaks down, the only other options are the 20-minute serpentine drive to the nearest pay phone or a 4,500-foot hike up Mount Forgotten, where, legend has it, a cell phone can find a signal on a clear day.

"The radio has gotten us this far," she said of what has passed for an emergency phone for decades. "But I don't think anyone is going to miss it much. It's a long time coming."

'Two longs and a short'

Founded in the folds of Silver Gulch in August of 1891, Silverton boomed over the next two years with 300 residents, a post office, two general stores, a saloon and a printing office.

But by 1911, Silverton began to fade. From 300 to 200 residents, then 150 over the next 20 years. The post office closed. So did the hotel and one of the stores.

As more and more dial tones hummed across the rest of the nation, Silverton residents remained free of outside phone contact. So did much of rural America.

In 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Communications Act to put an affordable phone in every home. American Telephone & Telegraph was allowed to charge expensive long-distance rates to help bring low-cost local phone service to the masses.

It worked. In 1934, one third of American homes had a phone. By 1980, 90 percent did. In a way, Silverton joined the forward march, thanks to Clarence Murray, its resident tinkerer. A master machinist who hand-built precision oceanographic measuring instruments, Murray was the town handyman and de facto mayor.

Murray, who bought the first in what would be a series of rustic homes along Highway 92 and the Stillaguamish River, wanted residents to be able to reach each other without the required hike between homes.

So he installed an Army surplus, hand-crank party-line phone system, similar to those found in many small towns then. Except this one lacked outside contact.

When she moved to town in 1983, Diane Boyd's Silverton phone still worked. With old party lines, every phone is wired to the next. You only answered it, she explained, when you heard your ring (except for eavesdropping, of course).

"Two longs and a short," she said, recalling hers. A continual ring meant an emergency, and everyone picked up.

But in a self-contained party-line system, when one phone goes down they all do. Silverton's system hasn't worked for a decade. Then, as now, anything serious meant also using the emergency radio and contact with Robe, Verlot or Granite Falls.

As the nation became increasingly connected in the late 1980s, Silverton slid backward.

Deregulation hurt -- and helped

When the breakup of AT&T began in 1983, the seven regional companies created didn't have the large pot of long-distance money to wire up remote places.

Moreover, the ensuing free market competition removed the incentive to build a low-profit project for a handful of people, so much of the work to wire remote towns stopped.

In 1996, Congress responded and set up the universal access fund, which essentially repays the cost of running phone lines to remote places, allowing companies to keep the profit from the ongoing service fees.

Because these places generally have fewer than 100 customers, many of the large companies, such as nearby GTE, didn't want to bother.

Washington phone regulators solicited bids anyway and even looked at the possibility of forcing companies to accept the Silverton project, and projects for Hobart near Issaquah and Stehekin on Lake Chelan.

Eventually, phone companies did step forward, and many communities are expected to have phones within a year or two. In Silverton, Brett Boyd, Diane's son, says he'll believe in phone service when he hears it.

He points to Beaver Creek, which successfully bid for the rights in 1999, but has delayed the project a couple of times.

And Boyd and others worry a little that the 80-acre town will change with the phone service. Property values will rise. The lack of phones and outside electricity -- many homeowners have their own generators and propane heat -- kept away big-money vacation homes from the narrow valley, where coho salmon spawn in the river next to the highway and granite peaks dominate the vertical horizon like skyscrapers.

"There is a little concern," said Brett Boyd. "But the benefits outweigh that."

So one more lonely winter to go for Silverton.

The coming snow and inability to chat at a distance makes the town and valley so lonely and isolated that in decades past, emergency radio operators used to all get on air Saturday nights for sing-alongs.

Phones have silenced the other towns' radios. And today's sheriff's deputies don't sing.

The Boyds, the Murrays and others can't wait for radio silence here, too. Diane wants to call family first. So does Denny. Brett laughed and said he'd finally be able to call in sick.

Silverton will get its first pay phone, too. Soon after -- its first jammed coin slot.


P-I reporter Mike Lewis can be reached at 206-448-8140 or <
mailto:mikelewis@seattlepi.com >mikelewis@seattlepi.com

• Florentine Truher-Lietzau family origins, out of Europe
• Emerging investigation as to Truher European emigrant origins.

Much of what follows is based on a brief conversation with a niece of Pat Schonborg, a distant Truher-Lietzau cousin. Remember Florentine Truher-Lietzau was married first to Martin Truher with whom she had two sons; then Florentine married a Mr. Lietzau with other children. All this in Germany. Florentine's sons emigrated to America in late 1870s. These last village in Europe is not confirmed,. My best guess about their last point of origin is
Koscierzynak (German name: Berent).

image

same url:
http://www.koscierzyna.gda.pl/eng/

Here are some possible village origins, currently being re-evaluated) from this region of West Prussia, southwest of Danzig, Pomerania, etc.

1. PLAESCHEN

2. BUKOVITZ, BUKOWWITZIEC

3. PORORESKIE

4. KOSCIERZYNA (BERENT)

German records were largely destroyed by the Poles after WWII, but there is also reconstruction or removal of records to East German territory organizations.

We even have located an 18th century Susanna Truher, but no confirmation of our blood line.

http://gene.truher.net/truher/Susanna/LDS-SusannaTruher3.jpg

http://gene.truher.net/truher/Susanna/SusannaTruher-Year1713Chemnitz.jpg

We have other indications that the Florentine Truher-Lietzau people were from much farther south - Lietzau near Leipzig. Florentine herself said she was from just south of Berlin, according to Ron Haack's tape with Augusta Truher Haack's daughter.

Wherever they came from in the particular, these people were Saxon stock - the same who invaded England and left their mark there, long before they invaded America to Minnesota, leaving California with us.
• jpg
• Gottlieb & Karoline Truher immigrants arrive in New York, July 8, 1870
• 3-Gottlieb & Karoline - another formulation --

Here's is email text connecting Bogenschneider's we text as from an email Jack to a few on or about 2010m0903.

We know from other document in this folder that August Truher arrived in New York July 8, 1870.

Jack starts out tonight with picture Ron and I have had for years. Lots more on the web now. So we wind up with some outstanding representations of a sister ship (meaning same technology & general appearance),

San Salvador, to August Truher's Western Metropolis

2010m0903

Start with

image Then work on that image

The sail-and-steam Western Metropolis used an engine of the "walking beam" type. Note the xxxxmast(?) rising through the deckhead of her wheelhouse.

http://www.hylandgranby.com/marine_antiques_paintings_details.asp?itemID=PA0693 ==
image

San Salvador

image

San Salvador


================================================
http://images.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/results?itype=Prints&q=Buffalo&fz=0

image
WESTERN METROPOLIS
imageimage  1895 ... WESTERN METROPOLIS Built 1856, at Buffalo, N. Y. HULL, of wood, by Bidwell, Banta & Co.; 340 feet over all; 40 feet beam, and 18 feet depth of hold. Tonnage 1,860 ONE BEAM ENGINE, by Merrick & Towne, Philadelphia, PA., diameter of cylinder 76 1/4 inches, by 12 feet stroke TWO BOILERS...

http://images.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/811/data?n=22

image

see full image,
Western Metropolis-EXT00419f,

http://images.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca/811/image/2713?n=22


image
• HBT Photo Album PA1 √ Jim2-Jack 1930s-1940s (pics and text)
 Still -- No phone service at Silverton in 2001
Thursday, November 29, 2001


By <mailto:mikelewis@seattlepi.com >

MIKE LEWIS

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER


This 2001 story is available online, complete with graphics.

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/48616_phones29.shtml

SILVERTON -- Invariably the question comes. While buying cassette tapes at Radio Shack or applying for a credit card. When writing a check for two weeks' worth of groceries after a 20-mile drive to the store or when meeting a new friend.

image

Diane Boyd knows it will be asked, so sometimes she lies.

"How do you tell people you don't have a phone number?" she wondered, smiling. "They always look at you funny, like you are from another planet. So sometimes I just make one up."

For 13 years, Boyd has wanted a phone number. She just can't have one -- yet. Neither can the 50 other residents of Silverton, a former silver and copper mining village surrounded by the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest.

In one of the most-wired states in the nation, a place where Internet access is considered a Gates-given right, Silverton remains one of the largest communities in the state -- and one of a few in the country -- without phone service.

No cell phones. No Internet. Not even a late-night wrong number.

But with a little luck, a fast snowmelt and a willing Seattle company, residents next summer will get the opportunity to screen calls from relatives, enjoy dinnertime interruptions and download e-mail spam.

They'll also be able to call 911, check on their families, look for jobs and, finally, stop lying to the counter help in electronics stores.

"It isn't asking too much," said Boyd, a U.S. Forest Service employee who lives here year round. "You see these commercials with some company bragging about Internet access in Katmandu, and I can't even make a call from Silverton, Washington."

Bob Shirley, a telecommunications analyst for the state's Utilities and Transportation Commission who has helped other remote Washington towns without phone service find willing companies, secure financing and run lines, called the situation, "unusual."


image
 
Gulf War veteran Jay Murray places a flag near the driveway to his family's home in Silverton. The town is scheduled to receive phone service next summer. Paul Joseph Brown / Seattle Post-Intelligencer



<
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/photos/photo.asp?PhotoID=7405

Click for larger photo


And even though the state and federal governments have programs to encourage "universal access," some towns still fall through the cracks.

"That is what has happened with Silverton," Shirley said. "It you are in a world without telephones, I guess it wouldn't be a big deal, but here it makes you a bit of an odd ball."

That oddball status could soon end.

Joel Eisenberg, founder of Seattle-based International Telecom LTD, learned about Silverton's plight and founded Beaver Creek Telephone Co.

A project too small to interest the large carriers in Washington's $3 billion phone market, Beaver Creek is small enough to want the low profit in spending roughly $1 million to run a fiber-optic cable from Silverton into the nearest phone line, a GTE cable that ends at a Verlot pay phone 11 miles west of town.

For Boyd and the 20 or so full-time residents of Silverton, the $50 monthly bill can't come soon enough.

She and her husband, Denny, run the town's telecommunications link to the outside world: a Forest Service emergency phone that sits in a corner of their enclosed porch.

If the Boyds aren't home when someone's house catches on fire or when one of the thousands of motorists who pass by on the Mountain Loop Highway breaks down, the only other options are the 20-minute serpentine drive to the nearest pay phone or a 4,500-foot hike up Mount Forgotten, where, legend has it, a cell phone can find a signal on a clear day.

"The radio has gotten us this far," she said of what has passed for an emergency phone for decades. "But I don't think anyone is going to miss it much. It's a long time coming."

'Two longs and a short'

Founded in the folds of Silver Gulch in August of 1891, Silverton boomed over the next two years with 300 residents, a post office, two general stores, a saloon and a printing office.

But by 1911, Silverton began to fade. From 300 to 200 residents, then 150 over the next 20 years. The post office closed. So did the hotel and one of the stores.

As more and more dial tones hummed across the rest of the nation, Silverton residents remained free of outside phone contact. So did much of rural America.

In 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Communications Act to put an affordable phone in every home. American Telephone & Telegraph was allowed to charge expensive long-distance rates to help bring low-cost local phone service to the masses.

It worked. In 1934, one third of American homes had a phone. By 1980, 90 percent did. In a way, Silverton joined the forward march, thanks to Clarence Murray, its resident tinkerer. A master machinist who hand-built precision oceanographic measuring instruments, Murray was the town handyman and de facto mayor.

Murray, who bought the first in what would be a series of rustic homes along Highway 92 and the Stillaguamish River, wanted residents to be able to reach each other without the required hike between homes.

So he installed an Army surplus, hand-crank party-line phone system, similar to those found in many small towns then. Except this one lacked outside contact.

When she moved to town in 1983, Diane Boyd's Silverton phone still worked. With old party lines, every phone is wired to the next. You only answered it, she explained, when you heard your ring (except for eavesdropping, of course).

"Two longs and a short," she said, recalling hers. A continual ring meant an emergency, and everyone picked up.

But in a self-contained party-line system, when one phone goes down they all do. Silverton's system hasn't worked for a decade. Then, as now, anything serious meant also using the emergency radio and contact with Robe, Verlot or Granite Falls.

As the nation became increasingly connected in the late 1980s, Silverton slid backward.

Deregulation hurt -- and helped

When the breakup of AT&T began in 1983, the seven regional companies created didn't have the large pot of long-distance money to wire up remote places.

Moreover, the ensuing free market competition removed the incentive to build a low-profit project for a handful of people, so much of the work to wire remote towns stopped.

In 1996, Congress responded and set up the universal access fund, which essentially repays the cost of running phone lines to remote places, allowing companies to keep the profit from the ongoing service fees.

Because these places generally have fewer than 100 customers, many of the large companies, such as nearby GTE, didn't want to bother.

Washington phone regulators solicited bids anyway and even looked at the possibility of forcing companies to accept the Silverton project, and projects for Hobart near Issaquah and Stehekin on Lake Chelan.

Eventually, phone companies did step forward, and many communities are expected to have phones within a year or two. In Silverton, Brett Boyd, Diane's son, says he'll believe in phone service when he hears it.

He points to Beaver Creek, which successfully bid for the rights in 1999, but has delayed the project a couple of times.

And Boyd and others worry a little that the 80-acre town will change with the phone service. Property values will rise. The lack of phones and outside electricity -- many homeowners have their own generators and propane heat -- kept away big-money vacation homes from the narrow valley, where coho salmon spawn in the river next to the highway and granite peaks dominate the vertical horizon like skyscrapers.

"There is a little concern," said Brett Boyd. "But the benefits outweigh that."

So one more lonely winter to go for Silverton.

The coming snow and inability to chat at a distance makes the town and valley so lonely and isolated that in decades past, emergency radio operators used to all get on air Saturday nights for sing-alongs.

Phones have silenced the other towns' radios. And today's sheriff's deputies don't sing.

The Boyds, the Murrays and others can't wait for radio silence here, too. Diane wants to call family first. So does Denny. Brett laughed and said he'd finally be able to call in sick.

Silverton will get its first pay phone, too. Soon after -- its first jammed coin slot.


P-I reporter Mike Lewis can be reached at 206-448-8140 or <
mailto:mikelewis@seattlepi.com >mikelewis@seattlepi.com

•  picture F3. Brother Jim wrote, "this is the one room shack that dad built on Sauvies Island, although it looks slightly larger than I remember. The thumbnail picture below is the house that dad built in a day at Sauvies Island. Dad standing with an unidentified woman. What I do remember is the privy outside, the porch was the stump of a tree about the size of the felled tree in the photo, a room divider made of a rope and blanket, and starting school a short distance away in a 2 room school house with 4 grades in each room, eating a real mud pie with sugar given to me by two mean little girls."

image

www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/HBT_PA1_05web.jpg

Other of Jim's report follow:

From: "James W. Truher"
Subject: "House" where Jack and I lived summer/fall in 1940.
Date: Fri, 18 Oct 2002 19:26:25 -0700

"I started 1st grade in a 2 room school house while
living in this shack with Jack and parents. Sauvies Island then was reachable only by a 3 car, 150 yard ferry ride. Sauvies is a few miles N/W of Portland on the edge of the Columbia River. The porch was a tree stump and the toilet was an outside hole in the ground with a shed built around it behind the house. My memory is that Dad built this in a day, it was one room inside divided by a blanket hung from a clothes line inside."
==========================================================

Sent: Friday, October 18, 2002 4:51 PM
Subject: Jim & Helen Truher family, on road jobs

"Jim is looking for some scenes from Scenic, the mountain areas near Seattle when our dad was a highway superintendent for a small, contractor name Coyle (more eventually explained later in this book).

Jack adds here: From this album, PA1, here are the most likely pages I could find set the Scenic:
PA1_12 (A-E; not F), PA1-16 A, PA1_17 (A; less B), PA1_18 (all; less B & C)."

Brother Jim found a map which
includes Silverton, Scenic, and Wenatchee (upper left in sequence to lower right on map). All of these place were major stopping points on the tour of Truher family adventures from 1934 - 1941.

same url: http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/SilvertonScenic-Wenatchee-uL-Lr.png
• pdf
• Truher_Gottlieb Kaszubs Jones Island, Milwaukee, 1872 as property custodians
• 2 - Gottlieb-goonsDominion.doc is a filed dated 2009-12-25 which explains the setting in an email exchange between Ron Haack and Jack Truher in 2010.

Ronald H. Haack wrote:
> Anyone like to hazard a guess as to where on attached Earth map is that Gottlieb marsh land?
>
> Ron Haack
>
cookierhh@verizon.net <mailto:cookierhh@verizon.net >

Jack Responds on 2009m1226 at 7:35 a.m.

No question: The property in question was called Jones Island. That original triangular space has been expanded by fill to become an industrial area with a sewage treatment plant, among other things. Jones Island sits as an ithsmuth just East of the University of Wisconsin Great Lakes Research Facility (increase magnification on last image of attached PDF).

The PNG attachments have text which I captured a few days ago from the record in my summary, which we have all seen. One reads on these PNG the circumstance under appeal.
Without complete certainty, I understand the appeals case in Wisc supreme court as follows:
In the 1872-1902 era squatters could sometimes assume Prima Facie title by exercising what I would call de-facto ownership by acceptance of peers and a record of good stewardship. Gottlieb may have implied some such presumed rights over the whole island, when he accepted $100 from Musa, who then assumed such a role as senior among squatters. For $100, Musa said he took ownership of Gottlieb's house and also the whole of the Island. Over time, things changed gradually until Illinois Steel Co became the dominant controlling operator on the growing Island. At this point, Musa attempted to assert his presumed Prima Facie title as a plaintiff in a civil suit against Illinois Steel, which suit was rejected in a court case that Haack-Truher in 2009 has not yet discovered. Musa appealed.

In the course of testamony to the original court hearing, Musa insisted that Gottlieb represented himself as a Prima Facie owner of Jones Island. Gottlieb said contrarily that he exercised only had such prima facie relationship to his house and perhaps its immediate property, not the entirety of Jones Island.

Musa appealed to the Wisconsin superior court, resulting in the record that we are reading in Wisconsin Superior court and American State Report google books. I don't recall reading a resounding rejection of Musa appeal in the record of appeal, but I assume that's what he got. Illinois Steel is presumed by me to have won the appeal. By the definition below, absence of of endorsement of a plaintiff's appeal by a court means the plaintiff lost.

Gottlieb's apparent refusal to join Musa may have been the basis for the bad vibes with Gottlieb that Ron has learned about elsewhere, and/or there may have been other tensions about a later property that Gottlieb had shared interest.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

prima facie [Latin, On the first appearance.] A fact presumed to be true unless it is disproved.

In common parlance the term prima facie is used to describe the apparent nature of something upon initial observation. In legal practice the term generally is used to describe two things: the presentation of sufficient evidence by a civil claimant to support the legal claim (a prima facie case), or a piece of evidence itself (prima facie evidence).

For most civil claims, a plaintiff must present a prima facie case to avoid dismissal of the case or an unfavorable directed verdict. The plaintiff must produce enough evidence on all elements of the claim to support the claim and shift the burden of evidence production to the respondent. If the plaintiff fails to make a prima facie case, the respondent may move for dismissal or a favorable directed verdict without presenting any evidence to rebut whatever evidence the plaintiff has presented. This is because the burden of persuading a judge or jury always rests with the plaintiff.

http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/prima+facie

------------------------------------------------------------------------


"In 1872 some nine families resided on the territory called "Jones island." It was then, and had been theretofore and was thereafter, all covered by water, except as artificially changed. In 1872 one Truher had a house on the submerged territory, supported in some way in the shallows, or resting on a piece of made land, but just how did not clearly appear. Truher pretended to exercise dominion over the entire territory and prevented any person from locating thereon without his permission."

We read in Illinois Steel Co. v. Bilot - about Jones Island.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jones_Island,_Milwaukee

We can find a nice historical map of Jones Island, at the terminus of the Menominee River and Kinnickinnic River..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menominee_River

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinnickinnic_River_%28Milwaukee_River%29

http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/whi/fullRecord.asp?id=6921

------------------------------------------------------------------------
===============================================
Jack writes again on 2009m1226 at 1:07 p.m.
on subject: "Gottlieb's Goons and Musa De Niro

MICHAEL TRUHER wrote:
This whole thing is really weird but interesting. why would gottlieb turn "states evidence" so to say? gottlieb and musa had some dispute apparently.

Ron said recently that he recalled that both Gottlieb and Jakob were employed by the Steel Company. The company could easily make it worthwhile that one or both of the brothers could be paid off or otherwise benefit from a favorable testimony in a legal contest for prime industrial waterfront property at the intersection of major riverways. Since Gottlieb arrived first, and had established himself, he would have had advantage over Jakob in such a back room negotiation, breeding the sort of competition for advantage that might damage a relationship.

Gottlieb's living on a swamp fill is not likely to have been a choice that Caroline and 6 year old August would have endorsed, or even endured. The wind whistling off Lake Michigan had to be unimaginable for long periods. The company might have planted August there among the squatters, specifically to favor a later settlement in favor of the company and eject the squatters.

It seems unlikely that laborers Gottlieb and Jakob would be situated in their own two story family dwellings not long off the boat, unless they had exploited some angle. We know that Jakob never rose above a laborer. Gottlieb as well, though he was a failed farmer for a decade in another comfortable house, until he moved his family into a third in Minneapolis. Pretty good for laborers: one with like 5 children and the other with eight or whatever.

All speculation, but more than possible, given the stories of family tension that persisted for generations.

Attached (again) is picture Ron sent of Jakobs nearby family home and grave stone.

image
================================================
Jack writes again at 2:53 pm
on subject: Poles vs German tension on Jones Island.

remember this segment of court text:

"In 1872 some nine families resided on the territory called "Jones island." It was then, and had been theretofore and was thereafter, all covered by water, except as artificially changed. In 1872 one Truher had a house on the submerged territory, supported in some way in the shallows, or resting on a piece of made land, but just how did not clearly appear. Truher pretended to exercise dominion over the entire territory and prevented any person from locating thereon without his permission."

following the speculations just offered, how indeed did Gottlieb "exercise dominion" or "prevent any person". He did not appear in pictures to be particularly dominant physical personage. Perhaps the company provide the muscle. Rather than actually living on the property with his family, it would make more sense that Gottlieb spent enough time there to look legitimate to earlier squatters, with constant visitors and company from company enforcers, almost certainly armed, because it was "hunters and fishing" excursioners that Gottlieb is reported to have repelled. All it would take is a few big fellows with attitude and weapons.

If the company lost interest, or the racket looked shakey, or the game was exposed and stopped by police, perhaps Musa came on the scene, with a more subtle approach. Managements change. Later Musa may have thought he was on his own, and so behaved in court.

Gottlieb's mental instability may have come from emotional trauma for living conflicted by threat of retaliation in response to his use of goon squads. What better place to escape than the Plains of Minnesota. Why not settle a distance away, more comfortably, after things cooled off. Minneapolis would be far enough.

Who will write the novel on this screenplay? Robert De Niro could be old man Musa telling the story, about how everybody got something out of the deal alive. Good ending, even if our Gottlieb went nuts for a time. He probably started out a little crazy.
====================================================

Brother Jim writes also on 2009m1226 at 1:39 p.m.


There was a lot going on back then…….


*Bay View Massacre*


*From Wikipedia*

Wisconsin Historical Marker

The *Bay View Massacre* (sometimes also referred to as the *Bay View Tragedy*) was the culmination of events that began on Saturday May 1, 1886 when 7,000 building-trades workers joined with 5,000 Polish laborers who had organized at St. Stanislaus Catholic Church <
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Stanislaus_Catholic_Church_%28Milwaukee,_Wisconsin%29 > in Milwaukee, Wisconsin <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milwaukee,_Wisconsin > to strike <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strike_action > against their employers, demanding an eight-hour work day <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight-hour_day >.

By Monday, these numbers had increased to over 14,000 workers that gathered at the Milwaukee Iron Company rolling mill in Bay View <
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay_View,_Milwaukee >. They were met by 250 National Guardsmen under order from Governor Jeremiah M. Rusk <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeremiah_McLain_Rusk > to "shoot to kill" any strikers who attempted to enter. Workers camped in the nearby fields and the Kosciuszko Militia arrived by May 4 <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/May_4 >. Early the next day the crowd, which by this time contained children, approached the mill and were fired upon. Seven people died as a result, including a thirteen-year-old boy.^[1] <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay_View_Massacre#cite_note-0#cite_note-0> Several more were injured during the protest.

Jim Truher



====================================================


One of the tensions here is that between Poles and Germans at the time that Gottlieb arrives on Jones Island. The text below explains that Germans arrived on Jones Island in "1870". Residents remained as squatters until 1940, when the island was surrounded by fill, as part of the city shipping port, undoubtedly by eminent domain.

Magnify a google map of Jones Island and you learn about a tiny park on the Island named after the earlier-than-Gottlieb Polish fishermen, Kaszubes among others:


http://wikimapia.org/1191775/Kaszubes-Park

Kaszubes-Park

"This is the smallest park in the milwaukee county park system. The park is named after the Kaszubes who once inhabited Jones Island before it became a peninsula. The park is marked by an anchor with a plaque and the stump from a large willow tree that until recently was at the center of the park. The park has been landscaped since the demise of the tree, and a portion of the dismembered trunk can be seen on the other side of the chain link fence bordering the park."

and from
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neighborhoods_of_Milwaukee

Jones Island
Main article: Jones Island, Milwaukee

"Jones Island is a peninsula located at the Milwaukee Harbor. It began as a fishing village populated by Polish settlers from the Kaszub region as well as some German immigrants in 1870. The settlers made their living by fishing Lake Michigan. Having never officially obtained a deed for the land, they were considered squatters by the City of Milwaukee and evicted in the 1940s. The city then proceeded to make way for a shipping port as part of an inner harbor design.

"The area is now heavily industrialized, containing only a few mature trees. Jones Island hosts much of the city's municipal services, including the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District. The area supports the Hoan Bridge and includes a shipping port, the Port of Milwaukee."

In support of my earlier screenplay, explain how a German in 1870s manages to take dominion over an island long inhabited by a dozen polish fishing families. Not done without muscle. The contempt that the Truher's had for Poles was explained to me at length as a child.
• Gottlieb family and children in Minnesota, 1870-1940
• data sheet 1: rhhimage
• data sheet 2 rhhimage
• data sheet 3 imagerhh
• png
• Gottlieb & Karoline Truher immigrants arrive in New York, July 8, 1870
• 1-Gottlieb & Karoline Truher immigrants arrive in New York, July 8, 1870

Bogenschneider family web site tells story of Gottlieb's family journey on the Western Metropolis

http://gene.truher.net/truher/WesternMetropolis-JBT/

======================================

Subject:
Gottlieb & Karoline Truher arrive New York July 8, 1870
Date:
Sat, 04 Sep 2010 08:36:10 -0700
From:
Jack Truher

We have long known that the Truher family arrived in New York from Germany on July 8, 1870, and place.

We have known about the good ship, Western Metropolis, on which they traveled and some detail of the events, but the graphics was poor. I've got some better imagery,
here than I recall seeing in our earlier research.

image

one of the Western Metropolis itself, and an artistic view of the San Salvadore( above)

I found a picture of a sister ship the San Salvadore, at least in appearance (above) and Technology.

Tonight, I'll send you
a web page, with the imagery and a couple of the other documents, with highlighted text that fixes the dates of things.

One of those other documents is also available on the web, as by the
Bogenschneider Family , which happened to include their arrival on the same ship and date, with more detail. (Look for the highlighted text) We've had this for a long time, but the images make a difference to me tonight. .

http://gene.truher.net/truher/WesternMetropolis-JBT/ is same link as above

The image below is the W.M. as a Paddle Wheel, before it's
Sails were added for the Atlantic
passenger trade, at which time it looked more like the San Salvadore at top of this message:


image
image


• Florentine Truher-Lietzau family origins, out of Europe
•  Truher-Lietzau-Schafferius-Kashubians.rtfd

Schafferius Family Update


   Travel in Steerage, 19th Century

Up to the second half of the nineteenth century, the transport of emigrants was only a subsidiary branch of cargo transport, and emigrants consequently travelled in cargo ships temporarily adapted for passengers.

A deck was built between the upper deck and the hold--in German this was known as Zwischendeck. Steerage was primitive. The berths were removed again at the end of the voyage since the space was needed on the return journey for cargo. They were knocked together out of mere planks, narrow and mostly too short.

Mattresses and bedding were provided by the passengers. There were few latrines and ventilation was poor. All the passengers were crowded into this poorly-lit deck both day and night. Only if the weather was good was it possible for them to emerge onto the upper deck.

Medical care was not available. Passengers provided their own food and crockery. (They were provided with water.) For cooking there was a fireplace or two, insufficient--this problem often led to quarrels between passengers and many went for days without a hot meal.

By about the end of the 1870s, the steamship had replaced the sailing ship which improved conditions almost at once. The passage (to the USA) was reduced to seventeen days--compared to the sailing vessel's ninety days. Fast steamers in the 1890s made the crossing in nine days. These were fitted especially for passengers and were better ventilated, had doctors, had privacy for women, and food was more plentiful.

as found in
http://www.myfamily.com

for the Schafferius Family Update.

Jack found this Australian family interesting, because of similarity in Schafferius

with a nearly identical spelling in the Truher family line. Also in my previous searches,
I found many of the same place of origin names, from whence I learned from the
Los Altos Lietzau descendent. The towns southeast of, and near Danzig which commonly appear in the stories of Truher-Lietzau and Schafferius-Lietza are:

Berent or Koscierzyna, and perhaps Pinczyn. Notice also in the related Colston & Wenck Generalogy that Karl Ferdinand Lietzau is said to hail from Berent (Koscierzyna) Germany, also identified as Kashubian/Pomeranian in Poland.

A Kashubian connection is another suggestive linkage as we learned in the story of Gottlieb Truher, which Jack told in the link:


imageimageimage

http://colston-wenck.com/getperson.php?personID=I473&tree=colstonwenck



KOSCIERZYNA IS 600 YEARS OLD: 1398 – 1998

  
German troops marched into town on 2 September 1939, and Hitler’s first victims included national activists, men of education and the clergy. The town did not passively surrender to the exterminators but fought back, and carried on fighting until the day of liberation. The first underground movement was a branch of the Polish Home Army organized by Jan Landowski. Another rebel force was the Gryf Pomorski (Pomeranian Griffin) Secret Military Organization. Numerous plaques and monuments in the town commemorate the heroes of those days.
Koscierzyna’s oldest monument is the well-preserved nineteenth century town centre with a unique market square. The four corners of the square are the departure points of two streets which each run at square angles to the square itself. The atmosphere of the small nineteenth century town is still present here. The fourteenth century plan of the town’s centre is still evident, although, due to the ravages of numerous fires, the oldest buildings date to the eighteenth century. A two-storied town hall built in 1843, with its distinctive clock on top, is the oldest building in the market square. Most of the residential buildings on the market square and the adjacent streets were built at the turn of the nineteenth century. The eighteenth century structures are represented by two interesting buildings: a house on Koscielna Street that belonged to the well-known town potters, the Budzynski family, and a residential building on Dluga Street. The seat of the local court is a fine example of old Neo-Gothic architecture.
Monuments of sacral art include the Neo-Baroque Holy Trinity parish church, built in 1914 – 1917, which replaced an older, smaller brick church. Its interior has retained its baroque and rococo character thanks to altars, a baptismal font and a pulpit salvaged from other churches which had been destroyed in fires. The church is the sanctuary of the Virgin Mary of Koscierzyna. Since the end of the seventeenth century, annual pilgrimages to the Wejherowo Calvary have begun from here. In the chapel next to the Neo-Gothic Angelic Virgin Mary convent school there is a pietà, a fifteenth century masterpiece of Pomeranian mason-work. The slender spire of the once Evangelical church and today a Catholic convent sanctuary towers over the area. The structure’s interior design, especially an admirable palm vault, altars and sculptures, are all the work of Koscierzyna’s famous sculptor Franciszek Greinke. The nineteenth century sacral structures include the Neo-Romanesque St. Barbara cemetery chapel from the 1880s, which replaced the eighteenth century church.
Koscierzyna’s necropolis is the final resting place for the ashes of the Kashubian region’s most worthy sons. Tomasz Rogala was a shoemaker by profession, but he was also a member of many patriotic societies and an organizer of workers’ meetings and the school strike of 1906. Rogala, referred to as the Kashubian King, made himself famous for his patriotic speech defending the Kashubian region at the Versailles peace conference. Lubomir Szopinski was a talented and devoted Koscierzyna-born composer and conductor and the founder of the Kashubian choir which subsequently grew into the Song and Dance Band of Kashubia. Another man of great local renown was Leon Heyke, a priest and folklorist, as well as a talented author of dramatized stage anecdotes often performed in Kashubia. His greatest achievement as a poet, however, is
Piesnie Polnocy (Songs from the North) in the volume entitled Kszëbszcie spiewë. Primary School No. 2 bears his name in commemoration of his merits.
The group of regional celebrities also includes Aleksander Majkowski - a  doctor, a poet, a regional activist and the founder of the Young Kashubia movement. He fought not only against the Germanization of Kashubia but also against provincial parochialism. He worked for previously existing organizations and set up new ones, such as the People’s Reading-Rooms Society or the Kashubian House. He initiated the publishing of the
Gryf (The Griffin) magazine which addressed Kashubian matters. He struggled to awaken Kashubian awareness among the local people. He wrote: “My Kashubian brothers, be yourselves!”. A commemorative bust of Majkowski has been placed at the foot of the old castle hill.
Kashubia was also a birthplace of Jozef Wybicki, the  author of the Polish national anthem. There is a monument in his honour in one of Koscierzyna’s main streets. Today, the National Anthem Museum is located in Bedomin (east of Koscierzyna) in the old manor-house where Wybicki was born on 29 September 1747. This replaced the Wybicki Commemorative Chamber in 1978 thanks to the efforts of the Kashubian and Pomeranian Association.
===========================================
source for text above has been lost
but check this out
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ko%C5%9Bcierzyna
leads to German language sources:

http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=titledetails&titleno=300730&disp=Kirchenbuch%20%20&columns=*,0,0
============================================

History of the land of the Kashubs
http://en.kaszubia.com/kashubians/history/kashubs_history
Tags: Kashubians
History of Cassubia is lengthy and interesting. The Kashubs have lived in Pomerania for over a thousand years, but their written history begins as late as 1238 AD. Pope Gregor IX called then the Stettinian prince Bogusław “the prince of Cassubia”. It is the oldest document known that mentions Cassubia, by which is understood the Western Pomeranian principality that existed from the 12th to 16th century and reclined to German political influences and military power.
In Eastern Pomerania since the end of the 12th century also existed an independent principality ruled by Subisław and his progeny. The most famous of them was Świętopełk who ruled the Gedanian Pomerania in years 1219-1266. His son Mściwój II ruled the land since 1271, unfortunately he had no successor. In 1282, he bequeathed his land to the Posnanian prince Przemysław II. When he died in 1294, Cassubia entered into a union with Poland and Przemysław was crowned a king of the newly augmented kingdom. At the beginning of 1296, he was assassinated though and his land invaded by the neighbors. Following that, in Cassubia began a long period of the Teutonic Knights’, intertwined with the Polish rule that lasted (with breaks) until the partitions of Poland (1772-1796). Then, for over 120 years, Kashubian land remained under the rule of Prussia. In 1920, it was taken over by Poland to which, less the Second World War years, it still belongs.
The Kashubs are a Slavonic nation most closely related to the Poles. Their language, Kashubian, belongs to the group of Slavonic languages and consequently resembles Polish, Russian and Czech. Because of the lengthy German neighborhood, Kashubian has incorporated many words derived from the Germanic languages, mainly German, but Kashubian grammar closely resembles that of Polish. The Kashubs pronounce some words in a manner similar to Poles, but use more vowels. Kashubian contains multiple dialects and a different variation of the language is spoken by the sea, in the area around Wejherowo, Kartuzy, or in the Tucholian Forests that form the southern border of Cassubia.
For many years Kashubs displayed a frail sense of their national identity, culture and language. Inadequate education, poverty, illiteracy, and German oppression afforded the latter decisive dominance in the area. The Kashubs were treated as the second-class citizens; a nation of a lower rank. At times they have endorsed similar attitudes themselves frequently showing no desire to change their dim fate. They could not imagine the world beyond their limited confines, as their rational horizons were rather narrow.
The first to recognize the distinctiveness of the Kashubian folk from their neighbors was Florian Ceynowa. He is known as the “Awakener of the Kashubs”. He has learned the Kashubian language, tried to collect its vocabulary and define its spelling. Active in the second half of the 19th century, he wrote and kept publishing short Kashubian stories along with scientific works. Unfortunately, he failed to “wake up” the Kashubs, became tired of the job and for the rest of his life worked as a physician. He died in 1881.
But soon the cultural level of Cassubia rose and the first Kashubian books appeared. The most famous of them was “O panu Czorlińsczim co do Pucka po sece jachôł” (About Mr. Czorlińsczi who went to Puck to buy the fishing nets) by Hieronim Derdowski. Its author also was a Kashubian activist who lived toward the end of the 19th century later immigrating to America where he kept publishing a popular magazine for American Poles called “Wiarus” (The Veteran). He died in 1902, aged 50.
Near the end of the century a Kashubian activist, Aleksander Majkowski, soon realized that he would not accomplish much working alone. Therefore he formed an organization dedicated to Kashubian matters which he called Towarzystwo Młodokaszubów (Society of Young Kashubs). It was active between 1912 and the start of the First World War. Its successes were rather few and far between but it has initiated collaboration of Kashubian activists. Majkowski himself continued to be active after the war later turning to literary works. Amongst others he wrote the greatest Kashubian novel “Żëcé i przigodë Remusa” (Life and Adventures of Remus) and a draft of the history of the Kashubs. He died in 1938.
Towards the end of his life Majkowski became a dedicated supporter of the young Kashubian activists who in 1929 formed Zrzeszenie Regionalne Kaszubów (Kashubian Regional Union). It incorporated Aleksander Labuda, Jan Trepczyk, Stefan Bieszk, Jan Rompski, Feliks Marszałkowski, and Rev. Franciszek Grucza. They published the “Zrzesz Kaszëbskô” (Kashubian Union) magazine and tried to enliven and alleviate the Kashubian culture and activity. Although they met with obstacles on the part of the Polish pre-war authorities and other regional circles and institutions, they managed to do a lot for the promotion of the Kashubian language and literature. Very well known are Labuda’s short stories (editorials ), Trepczyk’s songs, as well as the Kashubian translation of “The New Testament” authored by Rev. Grucza.
During the war the Kashubs lived under the German terror. Many were treated as Germans and forcibly enlisted into the Hitlerian army as cannon fodders. Thousands of inhabitants of this land were killed in public executions, in combat or Nazi concentration camps. Amongst them were Kashubian activists, e.g. Rev. Leon Heyke, bishop Konstantyn Dominik, the Mayor of Wejherowo Teodor Bolduan, or teacher Stefan Lewiński. In Cassubia throughout the war an underground organization „Gryf Pomorski” (Pomeranian Griffon) performed its anti-German actions.
After the liberation a verification of the Kashubs fighting in the Third Reich army was ordered alongside the rehabilitation of people who more or less voluntarily declared themselves as Germans during the war in this part of Poland. A feeling of mistrust to Kashubs came prevalent within the Polish authorities and lasted for many years.
At the end of 1956, a group of Kashubian intellectuals managed to set up a local organization called Zrzeszenie Kaszubskie (Kashubian Association) that later renamed itself to Zrzeszenie Kaszubsko-Pomorskie (Kashubian-Pomeranian Association). From the word go it has tried to take care of the Kashubian language and culture, document the history of the area, collect and protect the Kashubian folklore, inspire and create Kashubian literature and in many ways „wake” the Kashubs. The Association counts a few thousand members, conducts many actions and leads several institutions, while publishing numerous books devoted to Kashubian matters. Recently it launched the issuance of a three-volume publication entitled “The History of the Kashubs” whose first volume has already been released and written by Prof. Gerard Labuda, the best known of all living Kashubs in the world.
==========================

http://en.kaszubia.com/kashubians/history/maps

Maps – Kashubia Throughout History
Tags: Kashubia , Kashubians , Pomerania , Pomeranians
Kashubia Throughout History
The presented maps are based on research of Prof. Dr Józef  Borzyszkowski as published in his book “Historia Kaszubów” [en. History of Kashubians], Gdańsk 1999.They also reflect studies conducted by Dr Jan Modrawski as published in “Geografia współczesnych Kaszub” [en. Geography of Contemporary Kashubia], Gdańsk 1999.


image
Pomeranians (Kashubians) between 800-950, A.D.

image
Pomeranians (Kashubians) around 925, A.D.

image
Pomeranians (Kashubians) around 1180

image
Pomeranians (Kashubians) around 1220

image
Kashubians around 1370

image
Kashubians around 1640

image
Kashubians around 1660

image
Kashubians in 19th century

image
Kashubians 19th/20th century

image
Kashubians between 1918-1939

image
Kashubians in 20th century










• "Early Years with my 3 sons" by HBT
• A web page gathers a history of Helen Burke Truher with her young family

Subject:
    "Early Years with my 3 sons"
       written by Helen Burke Truher

Date:
      now gathered 3 decades later
      Fri, 18 May 2010
By:
      Jack Truher <jack@truher.net >


The linked URL below may be accessed separately, on the web. I have appended it in this page as well.
http://gene.truher.net/HBT/SeattleAltadena/earlyYears-3sons.html

 
Subject:
    "Early Years with my 3 sons"
       written by Helen Burke Truher

Date:
      now gathered 3 decades later
      Fri, 18 May 2010
By:
      Jack Truher <jack@truher.net >


This file is also at

http://gene.truher.net/HBT/SeattleAltadena/earlyYears-3sons.html
About 1980, my mother wrote a reliable history for her eldest son, Jim Jr., of their shared early years in Washington and Oregon. Then Helen was a struggling young mother in the sometimes wild forests of the Northwest, 1934-1941. With her husband Jim, and sons Jimmie and Jack, the family migrated often to construction camps or nearby apartments, where her husband, Jim, worked as a highway contractor's superintendent and business accountant.

Shorter chapters capture her recollections of her later, more traditionally residential era in Altadena. These latter two chapters recall events similarly for her sons, Jack and Michael.

Note: The five pictures on this web page are a random collection
which Helen Burke Truher had gathered together as representative
of her family life with three sons in Altadena.
image

You can download a larger text image file: 30 MB, 73 pages - in three parts - memories of years with her sons by Helen Burke Truher, written about 1980. It has a weakly printed pages.

This text should download as a single 30 MB PDF file to your desktop from the link just below.

http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/SeattleAltadena/HBT-EarlyYears-w3Boys.pdf
Contents: HBT recollection on years shared with each of three sons
pg 01-50 w JWT2
pg 51-63 w JBT
pg 64-73 w MBT
I can make reading the first 9 of those 73 pages a little easier, as I had earlier converted those typed pages to digital format with some Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software. I ultimately found that completing the OCR task was too time consuming among priorities.
Here below are the OSC converted 9 pages are available on the web:

http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/SeattleAltadena/HBTxt-JWT2-5m0510a.doc
http://www.truher.net/gene/HBTSeattleAltadena//HBTxt-JWT2-5m0510a.pdf
image

My mother's story gains context from album pictures she had gathered, and which I had digitized for web display in various ways.

For example, here are the family album pictures from the Seattle years (album PA1) in a separate web page:

http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/PA1/HBT-PA1-wComment.html

and the relevant pictures from two other of mother's albums from the same era:

http://gene.truher.net/HBT/PA02/PA02-PA03-tempPg.html

image

I have recently reestablished my more comprehensive genealogy web site, which includes the Burke and Ford lines.
http://gene.truher.net/TBF.ntweb/

The URL above has all the same pictures and text for mother's photo album, but you might prefer the format from the URL below.

http://gene.truher.net/HBT/HBTalbums-xhtml/toc.html

image

I found Helen's typically thoughtful response from mother to her grown son, Jack in 1972:

http://www.truher.net/gene/HBT/HBT-WWII-1972-1of3web.jpg



image
email Jack

• mp3
• 2003m0711 Some voice recordings in this Notebook.
• <a href="attachments/NoteTaker-2003_10_07-12_16.mp3">NoteTaker-2003_10_07-12_16.mp3</a>

Recorded Tuesday, October 07, 2003 12:16:14. Duration 00:13
• rtfd
• Florentine Truher-Lietzau family origins, out of Europe
•  Truher-Lietzau-Schafferius-Kashubians.rtfd

Schafferius Family Update


   Travel in Steerage, 19th Century

Up to the second half of the nineteenth century, the transport of emigrants was only a subsidiary branch of cargo transport, and emigrants consequently travelled in cargo ships temporarily adapted for passengers.

A deck was built between the upper deck and the hold--in German this was known as Zwischendeck. Steerage was primitive. The berths were removed again at the end of the voyage since the space was needed on the return journey for cargo. They were knocked together out of mere planks, narrow and mostly too short.

Mattresses and bedding were provided by the passengers. There were few latrines and ventilation was poor. All the passengers were crowded into this poorly-lit deck both day and night. Only if the weather was good was it possible for them to emerge onto the upper deck.

Medical care was not available. Passengers provided their own food and crockery. (They were provided with water.) For cooking there was a fireplace or two, insufficient--this problem often led to quarrels between passengers and many went for days without a hot meal.

By about the end of the 1870s, the steamship had replaced the sailing ship which improved conditions almost at once. The passage (to the USA) was reduced to seventeen days--compared to the sailing vessel's ninety days. Fast steamers in the 1890s made the crossing in nine days. These were fitted especially for passengers and were better ventilated, had doctors, had privacy for women, and food was more plentiful.

as found in
http://www.myfamily.com

for the Schafferius Family Update.

Jack found this Australian family interesting, because of similarity in Schafferius

with a nearly identical spelling in the Truher family line. Also in my previous searches,
I found many of the same place of origin names, from whence I learned from the
Los Altos Lietzau descendent. The towns southeast of, and near Danzig which commonly appear in the stories of Truher-Lietzau and Schafferius-Lietza are:

Berent or Koscierzyna, and perhaps Pinczyn. Notice also in the related Colston & Wenck Generalogy that Karl Ferdinand Lietzau is said to hail from Berent (Koscierzyna) Germany, also identified as Kashubian/Pomeranian in Poland.

A Kashubian connection is another suggestive linkage as we learned in the story of Gottlieb Truher, which Jack told in the link:


imageimageimage

http://colston-wenck.com/getperson.php?personID=I473&tree=colstonwenck



KOSCIERZYNA IS 600 YEARS OLD: 1398 – 1998

  
German troops marched into town on 2 September 1939, and Hitler’s first victims included national activists, men of education and the clergy. The town did not passively surrender to the exterminators but fought back, and carried on fighting until the day of liberation. The first underground movement was a branch of the Polish Home Army organized by Jan Landowski. Another rebel force was the Gryf Pomorski (Pomeranian Griffin) Secret Military Organization. Numerous plaques and monuments in the town commemorate the heroes of those days.
Koscierzyna’s oldest monument is the well-preserved nineteenth century town centre with a unique market square. The four corners of the square are the departure points of two streets which each run at square angles to the square itself. The atmosphere of the small nineteenth century town is still present here. The fourteenth century plan of the town’s centre is still evident, although, due to the ravages of numerous fires, the oldest buildings date to the eighteenth century. A two-storied town hall built in 1843, with its distinctive clock on top, is the oldest building in the market square. Most of the residential buildings on the market square and the adjacent streets were built at the turn of the nineteenth century. The eighteenth century structures are represented by two interesting buildings: a house on Koscielna Street that belonged to the well-known town potters, the Budzynski family, and a residential building on Dluga Street. The seat of the local court is a fine example of old Neo-Gothic architecture.
Monuments of sacral art include the Neo-Baroque Holy Trinity parish church, built in 1914 – 1917, which replaced an older, smaller brick church. Its interior has retained its baroque and rococo character thanks to altars, a baptismal font and a pulpit salvaged from other churches which had been destroyed in fires. The church is the sanctuary of the Virgin Mary of Koscierzyna. Since the end of the seventeenth century, annual pilgrimages to the Wejherowo Calvary have begun from here. In the chapel next to the Neo-Gothic Angelic Virgin Mary convent school there is a pietà, a fifteenth century masterpiece of Pomeranian mason-work. The slender spire of the once Evangelical church and today a Catholic convent sanctuary towers over the area. The structure’s interior design, especially an admirable palm vault, altars and sculptures, are all the work of Koscierzyna’s famous sculptor Franciszek Greinke. The nineteenth century sacral structures include the Neo-Romanesque St. Barbara cemetery chapel from the 1880s, which replaced the eighteenth century church.
Koscierzyna’s necropolis is the final resting place for the ashes of the Kashubian region’s most worthy sons. Tomasz Rogala was a shoemaker by profession, but he was also a member of many patriotic societies and an organizer of workers’ meetings and the school strike of 1906. Rogala, referred to as the Kashubian King, made himself famous for his patriotic speech defending the Kashubian region at the Versailles peace conference. Lubomir Szopinski was a talented and devoted Koscierzyna-born composer and conductor and the founder of the Kashubian choir which subsequently grew into the Song and Dance Band of Kashubia. Another man of great local renown was Leon Heyke, a priest and folklorist, as well as a talented author of dramatized stage anecdotes often performed in Kashubia. His greatest achievement as a poet, however, is
Piesnie Polnocy (Songs from the North) in the volume entitled Kszëbszcie spiewë. Primary School No. 2 bears his name in commemoration of his merits.
The group of regional celebrities also includes Aleksander Majkowski - a  doctor, a poet, a regional activist and the founder of the Young Kashubia movement. He fought not only against the Germanization of Kashubia but also against provincial parochialism. He worked for previously existing organizations and set up new ones, such as the People’s Reading-Rooms Society or the Kashubian House. He initiated the publishing of the
Gryf (The Griffin) magazine which addressed Kashubian matters. He struggled to awaken Kashubian awareness among the local people. He wrote: “My Kashubian brothers, be yourselves!”. A commemorative bust of Majkowski has been placed at the foot of the old castle hill.
Kashubia was also a birthplace of Jozef Wybicki, the  author of the Polish national anthem. There is a monument in his honour in one of Koscierzyna’s main streets. Today, the National Anthem Museum is located in Bedomin (east of Koscierzyna) in the old manor-house where Wybicki was born on 29 September 1747. This replaced the Wybicki Commemorative Chamber in 1978 thanks to the efforts of the Kashubian and Pomeranian Association.
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source for text above has been lost
but check this out
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ko%C5%9Bcierzyna
leads to German language sources:

http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=titledetails&titleno=300730&disp=Kirchenbuch%20%20&columns=*,0,0
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History of the land of the Kashubs
http://en.kaszubia.com/kashubians/history/kashubs_history
Tags: Kashubians
History of Cassubia is lengthy and interesting. The Kashubs have lived in Pomerania for over a thousand years, but their written history begins as late as 1238 AD. Pope Gregor IX called then the Stettinian prince Bogusław “the prince of Cassubia”. It is the oldest document known that mentions Cassubia, by which is understood the Western Pomeranian principality that existed from the 12th to 16th century and reclined to German political influences and military power.
In Eastern Pomerania since the end of the 12th century also existed an independent principality ruled by Subisław and his progeny. The most famous of them was Świętopełk who ruled the Gedanian Pomerania in years 1219-1266. His son Mściwój II ruled the land since 1271, unfortunately he had no successor. In 1282, he bequeathed his land to the Posnanian prince Przemysław II. When he died in 1294, Cassubia entered into a union with Poland and Przemysław was crowned a king of the newly augmented kingdom. At the beginning of 1296, he was assassinated though and his land invaded by the neighbors. Following that, in Cassubia began a long period of the Teutonic Knights’, intertwined with the Polish rule that lasted (with breaks) until the partitions of Poland (1772-1796). Then, for over 120 years, Kashubian land remained under the rule of Prussia. In 1920, it was taken over by Poland to which, less the Second World War years, it still belongs.
The Kashubs are a Slavonic nation most closely related to the Poles. Their language, Kashubian, belongs to the group of Slavonic languages and consequently resembles Polish, Russian and Czech. Because of the lengthy German neighborhood, Kashubian has incorporated many words derived from the Germanic languages, mainly German, but Kashubian grammar closely resembles that of Polish. The Kashubs pronounce some words in a manner similar to Poles, but use more vowels. Kashubian contains multiple dialects and a different variation of the language is spoken by the sea, in the area around Wejherowo, Kartuzy, or in the Tucholian Forests that form the southern border of Cassubia.
For many years Kashubs displayed a frail sense of their national identity, culture and language. Inadequate education, poverty, illiteracy, and German oppression afforded the latter decisive dominance in the area. The Kashubs were treated as the second-class citizens; a nation of a lower rank. At times they have endorsed similar attitudes themselves frequently showing no desire to change their dim fate. They could not imagine the world beyond their limited confines, as their rational horizons were rather narrow.
The first to recognize the distinctiveness of the Kashubian folk from their neighbors was Florian Ceynowa. He is known as the “Awakener of the Kashubs”. He has learned the Kashubian language, tried to collect its vocabulary and define its spelling. Active in the second half of the 19th century, he wrote and kept publishing short Kashubian stories along with scientific works. Unfortunately, he failed to “wake up” the Kashubs, became tired of the job and for the rest of his life worked as a physician. He died in 1881.
But soon the cultural level of Cassubia rose and the first Kashubian books appeared. The most famous of them was “O panu Czorlińsczim co do Pucka po sece jachôł” (About Mr. Czorlińsczi who went to Puck to buy the fishing nets) by Hieronim Derdowski. Its author also was a Kashubian activist who lived toward the end of the 19th century later immigrating to America where he kept publishing a popular magazine for American Poles called “Wiarus” (The Veteran). He died in 1902, aged 50.
Near the end of the century a Kashubian activist, Aleksander Majkowski, soon realized that he would not accomplish much working alone. Therefore he formed an organization dedicated to Kashubian matters which he called Towarzystwo Młodokaszubów (Society of Young Kashubs). It was active between 1912 and the start of the First World War. Its successes were rather few and far between but it has initiated collaboration of Kashubian activists. Majkowski himself continued to be active after the war later turning to literary works. Amongst others he wrote the greatest Kashubian novel “Żëcé i przigodë Remusa” (Life and Adventures of Remus) and a draft of the history of the Kashubs. He died in 1938.
Towards the end of his life Majkowski became a dedicated supporter of the young Kashubian activists who in 1929 formed Zrzeszenie Regionalne Kaszubów (Kashubian Regional Union). It incorporated Aleksander Labuda, Jan Trepczyk, Stefan Bieszk, Jan Rompski, Feliks Marszałkowski, and Rev. Franciszek Grucza. They published the “Zrzesz Kaszëbskô” (Kashubian Union) magazine and tried to enliven and alleviate the Kashubian culture and activity. Although they met with obstacles on the part of the Polish pre-war authorities and other regional circles and institutions, they managed to do a lot for the promotion of the Kashubian language and literature. Very well known are Labuda’s short stories (editorials ), Trepczyk’s songs, as well as the Kashubian translation of “The New Testament” authored by Rev. Grucza.
During the war the Kashubs lived under the German terror. Many were treated as Germans and forcibly enlisted into the Hitlerian army as cannon fodders. Thousands of inhabitants of this land were killed in public executions, in combat or Nazi concentration camps. Amongst them were Kashubian activists, e.g. Rev. Leon Heyke, bishop Konstantyn Dominik, the Mayor of Wejherowo Teodor Bolduan, or teacher Stefan Lewiński. In Cassubia throughout the war an underground organization „Gryf Pomorski” (Pomeranian Griffon) performed its anti-German actions.
After the liberation a verification of the Kashubs fighting in the Third Reich army was ordered alongside the rehabilitation of people who more or less voluntarily declared themselves as Germans during the war in this part of Poland. A feeling of mistrust to Kashubs came prevalent within the Polish authorities and lasted for many years.
At the end of 1956, a group of Kashubian intellectuals managed to set up a local organization called Zrzeszenie Kaszubskie (Kashubian Association) that later renamed itself to Zrzeszenie Kaszubsko-Pomorskie (Kashubian-Pomeranian Association). From the word go it has tried to take care of the Kashubian language and culture, document the history of the area, collect and protect the Kashubian folklore, inspire and create Kashubian literature and in many ways „wake” the Kashubs. The Association counts a few thousand members, conducts many actions and leads several institutions, while publishing numerous books devoted to Kashubian matters. Recently it launched the issuance of a three-volume publication entitled “The History of the Kashubs” whose first volume has already been released and written by Prof. Gerard Labuda, the best known of all living Kashubs in the world.
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http://en.kaszubia.com/kashubians/history/maps

Maps – Kashubia Throughout History
Tags: Kashubia , Kashubians , Pomerania , Pomeranians
Kashubia Throughout History
The presented maps are based on research of Prof. Dr Józef  Borzyszkowski as published in his book “Historia Kaszubów” [en. History of Kashubians], Gdańsk 1999.They also reflect studies conducted by Dr Jan Modrawski as published in “Geografia współczesnych Kaszub” [en. Geography of Contemporary Kashubia], Gdańsk 1999.


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Pomeranians (Kashubians) between 800-950, A.D.

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Pomeranians (Kashubians) around 925, A.D.

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Pomeranians (Kashubians) around 1180

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Pomeranians (Kashubians) around 1220

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Kashubians around 1370

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Kashubians around 1640

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Kashubians around 1660

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Kashubians in 19th century

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Kashubians 19th/20th century

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Kashubians between 1918-1939

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Kashubians in 20th century